They're at it again.

skinheaddave

SkorpionSkin
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Just witnessed my two H.spinifer mating. I don't know if it was succesful -- seemed like it got cut off short -- but the point was that Madame was at least somewhat receptive.

Which brings up an interesting point. If she had still had her young on her, she couldn't be mating, as she would still be defending her young. Is it possible that loss of young has the same effect in scorpions as it does in some "higher" creatures, in that it spurs them into mating again? It would be neat to look into, though I suspect that it is actualy a case that a female without young and who hasn't yet mated again will always be willing to mate again. Especialy with the forest scorps that don't have such a set mating season (living, as they do, in a more constant environment).

Cheers,
Dave
 

chau0046

Arachnobaron
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I`ve seen pics of Centruroides and other spp. mating with first instars on there back...Is it just forest scorps that are know to be that defensive?

Mat
 

Reitz

Arachnobaron
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Actually, I was going to ask a similar question.

I have never seen one of my Emps mate while carrying young on her back, but I've read documention of Centruroides doing almost all of their daily routine (eating, drinking, climbing, mating) while covered in little ones. Are H.spinifer known to be more active then Emps when they have young? My Emps close themselves in their burrows for at least a week when they give birth. Are your H.spinifer as active as always when they have young?

And by the way, congrats on all the mating! Sounds like you've given them the perfect climate for reproduction. You should keep the conditions constant all year. I bet you'd have some real happy scorps!

Chris
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
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Jan 6, 2003
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My last H. spinifer that gave birth stayed under a log in the enclosure for about four days, then she was out and about as usual. The time before, she was in the burrow until the young started coming off her back. Every scorpion I have bred has been to some higher degree of defensive than before.


adios,
edw. :D
 

skinheaddave

SkorpionSkin
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Chris,

Actualy, I think some variation would be a good thing. They do, after all, experience some seasonal variation in the wild.

Everyone,

A little bit of theorizing brings me to the conclusion that perhaps the absense of care past the first instar is the difference here. Sure, forest scorpions could just as easily mate with the young on their back, but what about once the young become more mobile and start hanging out underneath the mother? When this happens with Centruroides, they are already out and about. When it happens with Heterometrus it can be a long stay.

The other major difference, of course, is life cycle. Centruroides live fast and die young. I would think that being constantly gravid would be of greater importance to them and thus worth the risk of their young to the male. A Heterometrus, however, invests more in her young and lives a lot longer and may not feel the risk is worth the benefit.

It would be interesting to find a scientificaly determined answer to these questions, but with the general state of scorpion research, that is an unlikely proposition.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Reitz

Arachnobaron
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Dave,

Of course I was only kidding, it's just that I know how I feel when I have a good season for mating, why not give my scorps the same chance!

Chris
 

chau0046

Arachnobaron
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Mar 17, 2003
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Very good reply Dave!

Definetley answers my question(minus all the scientific jive).

Thanx

Mat
 
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