The T that no one handled

sick4x4

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
1,775
No, not smart at all. He's in for it if he gets stung.

Here's the wiki entry for them:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathstalker

It should be under lock and key, btw. I believe it's considered a species of concern.
im glad to see you didn't use deadly, there really should be a clear distinction...deadly as pertaining to a Bothrops atrox or ferdelance and what can be possibly harmful..not to sound to carefree about it but there can be alot of hysteria around so called deadly inverts.....

wayne
 

Merfolk

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
Messages
1,330
There surely is a pride thing. You mastered something that could kill you with no problem.. surely it is an important moment in your life. Doing it regulary without provoking anything might somehow train you to have perfect control on your reactions. Perhaps it would be the perfect training for the people who handle explosives.
 

BrynWilliams

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
1,295
There surely is a pride thing. You mastered something that could kill you with no problem.. surely it is an important moment in your life. Doing it regulary without provoking anything might somehow train you to have perfect control on your reactions. Perhaps it would be the perfect training for the people who handle explosives.
I take what you're saying with regard to the pride moment. However, when it comes to mastering reflexes, neurologically humans physical neuronal conduction distance and transmission speed are slower than that of a small invert purely due to our size. Couple that with an invert which cannot be trained, only habituated, and you're just playing with fire. A single circumstance change the invert may respond in a completely different fashion. Someone like RobC who has handled loads of his Ts, still got hit not so long ago because a juvie responded unusually.

However ego fuelling the moment may be, if something was to go wrong and disrepute be brought to the hobby, that would affect us all, which in my opinion is really not worth the realistically unnecessary action of handing them
 
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cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
i actually think not getting seriously tagged for long periods of time has the tendency to make ppl not so much inured as desensitized to risk, which would cause them to take more risks... which is a bad pattern. i think the difference is inured is knowing the risk and accepting it and desensitized is losing sight of the risk in part or all together. this is a much more worrying trend in stuff that is potentially deadly or really maiming and i don't purposefully ever hold anything that i think is likely to put my in the hospital. i don't do heavy scorps at all, and only do the Poecis and stuff that i am comfortable with and am reasonably sure won't bite me (and none have so far).

i know for myself the first time i hold something that is gnarly i generally just hand over hand it at most and then put it back. but for things that seem to respond well i am willing to have more interaction with. this is partly because as i get to know individuals more i feel like i can do more with some of them. but, as a general trend, the distance i will take gnarly bugs has increased over time. this has gotten me quite painful results a few times, but nothing i wasn't willing to risk and nothing that ever required a hospital trip. for the record, i have never been bit seriously by a tarantula... but three times so far centipede bites have sidelined a limb or me for 1-3 days. it wasn't a systemic affect, just that my arm hurt so wretchedly bad i couldn't do anything =P

and i DEFINITELY do not want to take a bite to the face, neck, or trunk from a semi-serious species! i can't imagine the strife the bad centipede bites could have caused if they were to my chest and not my hand or forearm
 
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