tarantula catching things off of humuns???

peterspiderling

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
147
ok, right now im very very ill with a very nasty virus,

i got acute tonsolitus, a head ache all the time, a ear ache all teh time, i keep being sick, my legs hurt all the time, my chest titens up and get shooting pains though them, i have a very high temprature, i feel really really cold tho, i cant sleep, and i stubed my toe just to add to every thing :| the docter also gave me 180 tablets to take, i got to take 16 a day!

so, since im ill, i was wondering, can tarantulas catch anything off of humuns? :?
 

Derek W.

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
120
T's are so different from us on the whole evolutionary chart that I am pretty sure it would be next to impossible to have a virus that can be transmitted from human to T.
 

AubZ

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 19, 2007
Messages
1,125
Very sorry to hear about you being sick. However, I wouldn't worry about the T's though.
 

P. Novak

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Messages
6,234
I've been sick many times and did maintance and feedings. Nothing ever happened. We are way too different to transfer viruses. Get better though.
 

Syngyne

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Messages
229
I dunno. My tarantula is a lot snarkier now than when I first got it. :p
 

TheDarkFinder

Arachnoangel
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Dec 18, 2004
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910
maybe, maybe not. cheshire post a link somewhere about screwing coral, true words of wisdom.

Yes it is possible for you to spread, fill in the blank, to your tarantula. Highly unlikely but possible.

Need an example. Mites. If you go through and do yard work then come in and mess with your tarantulas it is possible to spread mites from your yard to your tarantula.

Need another. Bacteria infections. Once again unlikely but possible.

Need a third. Mold spores, while not effecting our tarantula directly it does effect them indirectly. Every second of every day you are collecting and transporting mold spores.

Once again, it is highly unlikly that any of these would effect your tarantula but it is possible. Malaria, west nile, yellow fever, the plague are all spread by insects to humans, Do not think that it can not go the other way.
 

DrAce

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
768
I heard that T's can catch "super aids".
Given their lack of an Immune system with t-cells (they are part of the adaptive immune system which was evolved in fish before it got to us) I doubt they'd suffer much from HIV.

maybe, maybe not. cheshire post a link somewhere about screwing coral, true words of wisdom.

Yes it is possible for you to spread, fill in the blank, to your tarantula. Highly unlikely but possible.

Need an example. Mites. If you go through and do yard work then come in and mess with your tarantulas it is possible to spread mites from your yard to your tarantula.

Need another. Bacteria infections. Once again unlikely but possible.

Need a third. Mold spores, while not effecting our tarantula directly it does effect them indirectly. Every second of every day you are collecting and transporting mold spores.

Once again, it is highly unlikly that any of these would effect your tarantula but it is possible. Malaria, west nile, yellow fever, the plague are all spread by insects to humans, Do not think that it can not go the other way.
This is kinda correct. It depends on the infection, and what it is geared up to 'attack'. As mentioned above, if it's HIV, then it won't be able to infect anything because there is nothing there to infect. Simmilarly with tuberculosis, which is looking for a nice lung to hang out in. The structures that they go for are not present in spiders. Malaria goes for red blood cells. That's not going to be able to infect your spider.

Yes, Malaria, West Nile, Dengue etc are all passed by insects, but in most cases these are vectors, and are not 'infected' themselves. They are infested... there's a big difference.

Fungi and bacteria are both good examples, however, of things that can sometimes set up shop elsewhere. Fungi get a kick outa living whereever they can. If they can find SOMETHING to digest, they'll probably give it a shot. This includes spiders. Bacteria too. These are known as opportunistic infectious agents.

Again, though, being able to live on a spider and being able to INFECT a spider are not the same thing.

Your spider is not likely to catch anything nasty from you. It might act as an incubator for any lucky bugs to live in it, but it won't 'catch' the cold like you have.
 

sparular

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2007
Messages
184
xenotransmission

Since you have tonsilitis and and ear infection and you have to take a ton of pills, I'm guessing that it's a bacterial infection. Like others have said, viruses are very specific to cell surface receptors so usually only affect one type of animal. Bacteria however only need moisture, a food source, proper pH, proper temperature range, proper osmotic pressure, and to avoid an immune response. It is possible to give a spider a bacterial infection from a human. However, since we are so physiologically different it is not nearly as likely as spreading from human to human. You should still wash your hands if you are going to be messing with your spiders, just to be safe.
 

KaineSoulblade

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
177
Given their lack of an Immune system with t-cells (they are part of the adaptive immune system which was evolved in fish before it got to us) I doubt they'd suffer much from HIV.
Way to ruin a joke Ace.

...Hey I actually called someone 'Ace' that it applied to.
 
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