Switzerland Spider-ID ??

Najakeeper

Arachnoprince
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Dec 10, 2010
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So I have been seeing these wonder around my cellar all the time. The cellar is quite cold but they don`t seem to mind it much. I never caught one assuming that these are mature males looking for a mate. But yesterday I found one motionless, stuck to a piece of duck tape that I forgot to thrash. I removed the poor creature and put into my empty deli caps that I normally keep my Tarantula slings. I also threw in a S.lateralis youngster to keep him company. He was agitated and tried to escape.

This morning I find out that he webbed a little around the enclosure and he was almost done with the roach. When I shined white light on top of him, really pretty yellow color appeared. I keep calling him he as he was wondering and the pedipalps seem a little bulbous but he is surely smaller than others I have seen. And I am totally ignorant with true spiders.

Here is a couple pictures, anybody has any idea what this is? And do you think it is indeed a male, cos I will release it right away if it is a male.





 

Tarantula_Hawk

Arachnobaron
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Nov 24, 2005
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Tegenaria sp. (Agelenidae), and its a female.
One of the most commonly encountered European synanthropic genus.
They make for great pets (i.e. if you like them:D).
They are great webbers, capable of building pretty large sheet webs that end with a tubular retreat. If you plan on keeping her, give it more space and height. They are also active feeders and, once their web is complete, can tackle pretty large prey.
 

Najakeeper

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Tegenaria sp. (Agelenidae), and its a female.
One of the most commonly encountered European synanthropic genus.
They make for great pets (i.e. if you like them:D).
They are great webbers, capable of building pretty large sheet webs that end with a tubular retreat. If you plan on keeping her, give it more space and height. They are also active feeders and, once their web is complete, can tackle pretty large prey.
Great!

I may keep her :)

Thanks

---------- Post added at 02:47 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:41 PM ----------

I have been checking some pictures and this looks like T.duellica, is that correct?
 

Hatr3d

Arachnosquire
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Nov 11, 2009
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It's pretty hard to determine the species of this genus from a picture, I wouldn't go further with the ID. ;)
 

Tarantula_Hawk

Arachnobaron
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Yea as ^ said there are several very similiar species which are hard to tell apart from pictures only.
The species you mentioned is not reported for Switzerland, so its definitely not it. A best guess would be either T. domestica or, better, T. atrica. You need stereoscopic genital analysis for a 100% species confirmation though, so dont take my word. :)
 

Najakeeper

Arachnoprince
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So a week or so later after her capture, I notice an g sac attached to the top of the enclosure and today I see 10s or maybe 100s of little slings emerging from the sac.:)

Funny how life is...I could have discarded the piece of tape that she was stuck to but I saved her thinking that I was saving the life of one spider yet I actually saved a bit more than that. ;) Well she is already fat and happy from all the lateralis roaches she has devoured so I will wait a week or so 'till the slings molt and I will let everyone go on a warm sunny day...

I got 21 Ts, and this is my first captive production :D.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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Jan 5, 2005
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please don't let them go


nothing should ever go from anyone's collection back into nature


there are tons of pathogens you could move from your collection to nature. virtually all feeders end up with grain mites. odds are it is not the grain mites that live in your country... and you could easily spread them

not to mention there are tons of bacteria, molds, viruses and other half alives, etc.
 

TheTyro

Arachnobaron
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Aug 16, 2009
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418
Tegenaria for sure, I'd say T.atrica (just based on my experience with T.gigantea....I believe they are one and the same anyways)

I have an adult female captive right now abd she's a fantastic spider. We have a huge population of various Tegenaria spiders in my backyard...T. agrestis, T. domestica and T. gigantea. Have fun with yours! They are great fun! :D
 
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