Start with meal worms and then crickets later?

dragonblade71

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 1, 2007
Messages
422
I am planning oneday to obtain a tarantula spiderling or juvenile and for live feeding, I am assuming that it's probably preferable to start off with meal worms for the little spider? Crickets can get a little defensive and they have powerful hind legs so I thought it would be best to introduce them a little later on in the tarantula's life when it's a bit bigger. So basically meal worms first and crickets later. Does this sound like the right approach?
 

Mushroom Spore

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 14, 2005
Messages
4,596
I think mealworms can bite, too.

If you're worried about crickets being a danger, kill the crickets first. I raised both my spiderlings that way, by keeping a small stash of crickets in the freezer. Drop it into the enclosure, and in the few minutes it takes for the thing to thaw, the spiderling will already be sitting on it or carrying it off (depending on their respective sizes).

They're approaching 2" now, and I've only just recently and with great caution started offering live prey once in a while. So far no problems, although I did have to chase down a cricket the other day, as my little L. parahybana decided to be in premolt and wasn't hungry.
 

dragonblade71

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 1, 2007
Messages
422
Ah I didn't realise that meal worms can bite...Ive got no experience with those creatures. However, I have read a number of times it's recommended to bash the meal worm's head to stop it burrowing into the substrate. So I guess this tactic will stop it biting too. With the head crushed, will it still wiggle around like a regular worm? I am surprised that tarantulas take to dead prey as you say with your deceased crickets. I would normally assume that a tarantula would be attracted to the movement of a living organism.
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2006
Messages
569
I am surprised that tarantulas take to dead prey as you say with your deceased crickets. I would normally assume that a tarantula would be attracted to the movement of a living organism.
All my slings get prekilled crix not live. And yes especially superworms can hurt a sling so there heads get crushed as well plus it keeps them from burrowing.
 

Drachenjager

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 23, 2006
Messages
3,513
spiderlings will kill crickets if you feed them small enough crickets. But they will eat cricket parts and dead or dying crickets too. I ahvent seen any over a 2" legspan take a dead cricket tho. I am getting away from crickets anyway too nasty lol moving to roaches much better feeders for many reasons
 

ricneto

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 9, 2007
Messages
85
spiderlings will kill crickets if you feed them small enough crickets. But they will eat cricket parts and dead or dying crickets too. I ahvent seen any over a 2" legspan take a dead cricket tho. I am getting away from crickets anyway too nasty lol moving to roaches much better feeders for many reasons
Do you breed you own roaches?
How many roaches a week do you have to be using to be worth to start your own colony instead of buying?
 

Drachenjager

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 23, 2006
Messages
3,513
Do you breed you own roaches?
How many roaches a week do you have to be using to be worth to start your own colony instead of buying?
one T wouldnt be worth raising any prey items i dont think. If you buy crickets and get them about half grown they will last a little while. Before i tried raising any i would get about 6 small and 6 large and got to fed them all to my 2 Ts before they died out. feed them 3 large ones then a week or so later fed the others that were larger by then.

However, if you live where you can buy roaches, you could get someone to sell you a few nymphs and they will last a long time , if you have a large T you could maybe order a few adult males and some nymphs jsut to have them last longer.
 

Brettus

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
167
Dragonblade, I just get crickets from the pet-shop. I buy the brand called pisces, and they come in all sizes, from pinhead to large. The pinhead crickets are really tiny, and would be suitable for a spiderling. I got mine at 5 cm wide, and she tackled the small crickets fine.

Ah I didn't realise that meal worms can bite...Ive got no experience with those creatures.
I'm not sure how much of a threat they pose to T's, but I keep bearded dragons, and they are a real bugger. You can't feed juvi's them at all-they don't crush the meal-worm but swallow it whole. Sometimes, the still-alive mealworm will actually try to eat its way out of the lizard's stomach-can result in death for young ones.
 

Nightshade

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 3, 2006
Messages
288
I haven't tried crushing the heads of mealworms myself, but I would definitely recommend pihneads (alive or dead, however the spider seems willing to take them) until it's reached at least 1" in size. In my mind it's not a matter of biting, the mealworm is twice the length of the spider so if the spider doesn't have enough bulk on it to keep from being thrown into the enclosure walls when the worm starts flailing around, it's going to get hurt.
Maybe cutting it in half would be more effective than just crushing the head.
 

JMoran1097

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
924
I am planning oneday to obtain a tarantula spiderling or juvenile and for live feeding, I am assuming that it's probably preferable to start off with meal worms for the little spider? Crickets can get a little defensive and they have powerful hind legs so I thought it would be best to introduce them a little later on in the tarantula's life when it's a bit bigger. So basically meal worms first and crickets later. Does this sound like the right approach?
not necessarily. you can always pre-kill a cricket, crush the head, or simply remove the legs from a small pinhead so the sling can easily pounce and kill. of course, it's a bit more difficult than just putting a small mealworm in there. whatever works best for you I suppose. I just hate mealworms because they rot quickly and stink up the enclosure.
 

Mushroom Spore

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 14, 2005
Messages
4,596
You can't feed juvi's them at all-they don't crush the meal-worm but swallow it whole. Sometimes, the still-alive mealworm will actually try to eat its way out of the lizard's stomach-can result in death for young ones.
Urban legend. Why do people still believe this garbage? :mad:

Is it true that mealworms can eat their way out of a gecko's stomach?
No. This is just a myth and we have never been presented any scientific data yet to prove this has actually happened. Your gecko's stomach has digestive juices which will actually kill the mealworm quite quickly - if the teeth don't do it first!

Can mealworms hurt my gecko in any way?
Yes. It is possible for your gecko to be hurt my a mealworm but this rarely happens if you are careful. Loose mealworms can nibble on your gecko if it is weak/sick/sleeping. Be sure to include a fresh piece of carrot or something for the mealworm to nibble on in case it escapes the mouth of your hungry gecko! Feeding too many mealworms or ones that are too large can also be harmful. Do not overfeed your gecko and try to offer freshly molted mealworms as they are softer and much easier to digest.
 

IdahoBiteyThing

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 2, 2007
Messages
599
sling food

Lots of good advice here. I quit using crickets due to smell/nematodes/ick factor and have been using roaches and mealworms for slings. Roaches are cool because they grow slowly (B. dubia), live for about 2 years, don't stink, and are easy to care for. I head squish or freeze everything I give to slings, no biting problems. The roaches especially are nice because even when head-squished they continue to move which is nice for larger T's that are reluctant to take dead prey. Mealworms are nice for tiny slings since you can cut off the head, and give them a portion of a mealworm if it looks too big. Also, if you're using crickets, you can just give the slings a "drumstick"- just take off one of those nice, big fat back legs and presto, non-kicking, non-biting, tasty meal. Good Luck!
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 7, 2005
Messages
3,160
Tarantula slings will take cricket parts just fine. The back legs of small crickets make fine feeders.

Lobster roaches have great sling sized nymphs, as do S. lateralis. If you can find a decently priced culture of pseudomops septrionalis, those are the very best sling feeders.

I'm not sure how much of a threat they pose to T's, but I keep bearded dragons, and they are a real bugger. You can't feed juvi's them at all-they don't crush the meal-worm but swallow it whole. Sometimes, the still-alive mealworm will actually try to eat its way out of the lizard's stomach-can result in death for young ones.
Try this experiment. Submerge a mealworm in a glass of water and see how long it takes to stop squirming. Don't give it any access to air at al. The mealworm should take about 30 seconds, a minute at the very tops to stop moving. It would take maybe 10 minutes to chew through the stomach lining of a reptile. Definitely not enough time to do any sort of harm.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
Urban legend. Why do people still believe this garbage? :mad:

Is it true that mealworms can eat their way out of a gecko's stomach?
No. This is just a myth and we have never been presented any scientific data yet to prove this has actually happened. Your gecko's stomach has digestive juices which will actually kill the mealworm quite quickly - if the teeth don't do it first!

Can mealworms hurt my gecko in any way?
Yes. It is possible for your gecko to be hurt my a mealworm but this rarely happens if you are careful. Loose mealworms can nibble on your gecko if it is weak/sick/sleeping. Be sure to include a fresh piece of carrot or something for the mealworm to nibble on in case it escapes the mouth of your hungry gecko! Feeding too many mealworms or ones that are too large can also be harmful. Do not overfeed your gecko and try to offer freshly molted mealworms as they are softer and much easier to digest.
i've seen that happen. my old science teacher had a very old and feeble iguana. it died with a meal worm or two bored out. i saw the body and my brother saw the meal worm poke its way out. doesn't sound like it happens very often, by a long shot... but it can and does happen
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 7, 2005
Messages
3,160
i've seen that happen. my old science teacher had a very old and feeble iguana. it died with a meal worm or two bored out. i saw the body and my brother saw the meal worm poke its way out. doesn't sound like it happens very often, by a long shot... but it can and does happen
Is it possible the superworms bored through the iguana after it died from an external source?
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
Is it possible the superworms bored through the iguana after it died from an external source?
it's possible... but i seem to recall the people being pretty graphic in the description of watchign something crawl out. i'll ask my brothers which one saw it and find out
 

Nitibus

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
728
i've seen that happen. my old science teacher had a very old and feeble iguana. it died with a meal worm or two bored out. i saw the body and my brother saw the meal worm poke its way out. doesn't sound like it happens very often, by a long shot... but it can and does happen
We have to make the distiction between meals worms ( Tenebrio molitor )
and superworms ( Zoophobas mario) . Mealies will eat '"meal " only ( bran oats etc.. ) Mealies are herbivores ONLY. Super worms are omniviores ( sp ) they will eat about anything.

I throw mealies in with T's I think my be in premoult to see if the T eats. There is NO threat from aTenebrio molitor ! The worst it could no is stress out a mouting T if I haven't removed it by then.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
We have to make the distiction between meals worms ( Tenebrio molitor )
and superworms ( Zoophobas mario) . Mealies will eat '"meal " only ( bran oats etc.. ) Mealies are herbivores ONLY. Super worms are omniviores ( sp ) they will eat about anything.

I throw mealies in with T's I think my be in premoult to see if the T eats. There is NO threat from aTenebrio molitor ! The worst it could no is stress out a mouting T if I haven't removed it by then.
are you sure about that meal worms only eat meal thing? mine eat fruit too, and i think i have seen pics of them eating carrion.


and it might have been super worms. this happened like 15 years ago
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 7, 2005
Messages
3,160
We have to make the distiction between meals worms ( Tenebrio molitor )
and superworms ( Zoophobas mario) . Mealies will eat '"meal " only ( bran oats etc.. ) Mealies are herbivores ONLY. Super worms are omniviores ( sp ) they will eat about anything.

I throw mealies in with T's I think my be in premoult to see if the T eats. There is NO threat from aTenebrio molitor ! The worst it could no is stress out a mouting T if I haven't removed it by then.
I have fed T. molitor ham successfully (many times) and others on this forum have fed their T. molitor mice.

T.molitor is just as dangerous as Z. morio.
 
Top