South Orange County T's?

What

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Messages
1,150
What species of T's are native to south Orange county California?

I found this beauty and I am trying to get her ID'ed.




Click pictures for larger.
 
Last edited:

Brent H.

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 21, 2005
Messages
72
What species of T's are native to south Orange county California?

I found this beauty and I am trying to get her ID'ed.




Click pictures for larger.
It's in the A. eutylenum complex... not much else can be said at this time.
 

Mina

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 4, 2005
Messages
2,136
I don't know what kind of T she is, but she is lovely. Congratulations on finding her.
 

What

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Messages
1,150
It's in the A. eutylenum complex... not much else can be said at this time.
So can I label it as A. eutylenum? Also, I may consider donating it to your research projects, but would I ever get her back?
 

syndicate

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
4,508
how about donating it to me instead lol
j/k
great lookin aphopelma u found there!any pics of its habitat?
 

sick4x4

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
1,776
i love the OC...where was it like mission viejo??? great find....
 

Brent H.

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 21, 2005
Messages
72
So can I label it as A. eutylenum? Also, I may consider donating it to your research projects, but would I ever get her back?
Yep, I think A. eutylenum is fitting for the time being. However, that could all change.

I would keep her if I was you. All specimens I receive will eventually have to go to a museum, so unfortunately, I would be unable to send her back. But, thank you for your consideration.
 

What

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Messages
1,150
2 years, 1 month, 4 days later and I still have her, and she still hasnt molted...





Getting pretty dull... More images can be seen here.
 

killy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 20, 2009
Messages
249
Hi - My sister and brother-in-law live in Trabuco and Ron tells me he sees Ts walking around periodically - I know they're a. eutylenum because I researched the tarantula I caught when I was a kid in San Bernardino and found out that's the genus we have here in So Cal - I asked him to capture one for me the next time, but later learned that the Ts he was seeing were probably mature males out for a good time before checking into that big Kritter Keeper in the sky - so it's encouraging to know, based on the longevity of your T, that that is not necessarily the case. Question - how big was she when you captured her? Adult? Juvenile? (Your photos are red-exed on my computer so I can't see them) .....:? :?
 

burmish101

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 13, 2008
Messages
492
Very attractive Aphonopelma, do all of those complex look like that or similar?
 

Loudog760

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
247
The Aphonopelma genus takes for ever to molt. You might have to wait a few more years+. John3800 from Youtube has an adult female A. chalcodes that just molt not to long ago. He waited 10 years for her to molt! :eek:
 

What

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Messages
1,150
I know they're a. eutylenum because I researched the tarantula I caught when I was a kid
Well... to my understanding they are in the species complex of "eutylenum", but that it is no longer a valid species name... Aphonopelma taxonomy(as Brent can vouch for) is a mess.
Question - how big was she when you captured her? Adult? Juvenile? (Your photos are red-exed on my computer so I can't see them) .....:? :?
The T is around 3.5" DLS and has been that way since I collected it. So, mature female based upon the other Ts I have seen around here.
Very attractive Aphonopelma, do all of those complex look like that or similar?
From what I have seen they all have similar features, but can vary widely in the intensity of colors/darkness of carapace/ect.
 

hamfoto

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
777
A. eutylenum is a valid name...it's a "complex" because there are a number of other "species" that have been named in the region but are probably nothing more than variants of eutylenum. That spider can be found throughout a wide range, with a variable appearance.
 

campj

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Messages
286
Did you get her out of the her burrow or find her out and about?
 

2LeggedFreak

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 10, 2009
Messages
11
OC T find? Wow!...

I'm new to SOC. Admittedly, I haven't been directly looking for them, but I live in RSM and have NEVER seen any type of T crawling around here. It's only recently I really started paying attention. Nice find.

I was kinda' hoping to locate a group/club in SOC who might go out hunting for finds like this every so often. I understand that, as Fall approaches, they should be all over the place. Anybody know of anyone who does this type of stuff?

Thanks!
 

What

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Messages
1,150
A. eutylenum is a valid name...it's a "complex" because there are a number of other "species" that have been named in the region but are probably nothing more than variants of eutylenum.
All I can find for sure is that A. "eutylenum"and A. iodius are different species...

But, all these species are found in SoCal and supposedly look very similar...

A. clarum, A. cratium, A. cryptheum, A. eutylenum, A. iodius, A. phanum, A. radinum, and A. steindachneri(plus a couple other dubious names...)

Of those clarum, cratium, cryptheum, eutylenum, and phanum were all described by Chamberlin in 1940, iodius and radinum by Chamberlin and Ivie in 1939, and steindachneri was described by Ausserer in 1875.

If they all turn out to be the same thing wouldnt they be renamed after the earliest valid description?
Did you get her out of the her burrow or find her out and about?
Out of her burrow.
I was kinda' hoping to locate a group/club in SOC...
Check out SCABIES.
 

Randomhero148

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
224
Ya I caught a couple out there but I released them except for one large female juvie, looks similar to yours but little different. I have seen all black ones with red abdomen hairs that are beautiful up there. I go to the hills that seperate San Clemente and Mission Veijo. That hill up by the 5 freeway seperates the two cities and thats where I like to walk and observe them in the wild. I was there actually 4 days ago and found a nice burrow tried to coax her out to take a look, but she wasnt very happy so I left her alone. Nice catch, maybe we should organize a trip with a few of the board members here. PM me if interested.
 

Ohana

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
8
I'm new to SOC. Admittedly, I haven't been directly looking for them, but I live in RSM and have NEVER seen any type of T crawling around here. It's only recently I really started paying attention. Nice find.

I was kinda' hoping to locate a group/club in SOC who might go out hunting for finds like this every so often. I understand that, as Fall approaches, they should be all over the place. Anybody know of anyone who does this type of stuff?

Thanks!
I live in Coto de Caza right next to RSM and we see T's frequently in the hills. I have a female that we caught a in late July this year and she just molted 2 weeks ago. Now is a good time to go hiking and look for the males walking around looking for mates; they are short-lived, so seeing them and not catching them is the best to do.

Kevin
 
Top