solfugid

Justin

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 8, 2003
Messages
126
I wanted to get a Egyptian Giant banded solfugid from todd Gearheart, they are about four inches long at the moment, does that sound like they do not have much of a long period of time to live, and does any one have any experience with these if so could you tell me how you took care of them and if you had success. thanks. justin.
 

Wade

Arachnoking
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Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
Solfugids generally live live less than a year, total life span. Like many invertebrates, they go from egg to adulthood quickly, reproduce and then die. The long-lived creatures like tarantulas and scorpions are the exception to the rule. How long one you purchase will live depends on how close it is to the end of that span when you get it. The one hope is that hobbyists will eventualy master the art of breeding these, and we can keep them in culture.

Alex is the solfugid master around here, doubtless he'll be popping in shortly to share his husbandry knowledge, as well as info on that particular species.

Wade
 

Alex S.

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
645
Solifugae: Galeodidae

The Egyptian giant solifugids are usually either the species Galeodes arabs or Galeodes granti. A 4" legspan specimen probably wont live much longer than 2 months although, Galeodes arabs females can get up to 6.5" in legspan with a body length of up to 3.5". When the specimen dies you can always preserve it in alcohol though. As for care info, solifugids are quite easy to keep in captivity as no matter what, even in the wild, they usually dont live any longer than a year. A medium to large-sized tupperware container works fine as an enclosure for large Galeodids. Remember to poke holes throught the lid. This works well by heating a metal rod-like object and melting holes into the lid. Substrate should be at least 5" of sand with one half of the enclosure containing somewhat moistened sand to allow for the solifugid to burrow. Adding hides such as cork-bark or halves of clay pots is needed as it will also encourage the solifugid to burrow if there is support from other objects. Solifugids do need efficient heat. A desk lamp placed around 10" to 12" from the lid of the enclosure works well. Using black bulbs is reccomended as the genus Galeodes consists mainly of large nocturnal species. Feed the solifugid at least 2 to 3 large crickets every day. Solifugid specimens over 2" in body length will easily take an occasional pinkie mouse or small lizard, such as house geckos. A water dish is never needed as solifugids get all the liquids they need from their prey. These requirements will allow the solifugid to live out the rest of its days quite happily.

Alex S.

P.S. Thanks for the plug Wade :)
 

atavuss

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
1,034
Originally posted by Justin
I wanted to get a Egyptian Giant banded solfugid from todd Gearheart, they are about four inches long at the moment, does that sound like they do not have much of a long period of time to live, and does any one have any experience with these if so could you tell me how you took care of them and if you had success. thanks. justin.
I had a large adult that was about 3 or 4" (I do not know if it was a male or female) that I managed to keep for 8 months. I kept it in my herp/invert room that had lows of 72 and highs of 82 in the winter and lows of 75 and highs of up to 97 in the summer. substrate was 50/50 play sand and forest bed. it was in a large kritter keeper with a cork bark hide. it never molted in my care. I fed it about 5 times a week. the substrate was kept dry and there was a small water dish that I never saw it use. it was a fascinating creature to say the least! I would like to get more but because they are so short lived and hard to find I have not done so.
Ed
 

Alex S.

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
645
Solifugae: female/male

Hi Ed, I guarantee you had a female as those are the only sex of solifugid in the hobby. The males have a flagella-like spine on the chelicerae used for transferring spermatophore.

Alex S.
 
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