Shipping with heat pack?

CakeLore

Arachnosquire
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Jul 12, 2013
Messages
105
I'm having my Ts shipped from Pennsylvania to Seattle. The overnights lows next week here are in the mid 40s, but it's a good bit warmer in PA. Is a heat pack necessary here? I would have them overnighted, and I'm not sure how cool the shipping environment is kept but they wouldn't be sitting out overnight here or anything. I'm just really stressed about them getting too cold, but I also don't want to cook them to death. :(
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
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Well, some heat packs reach a certain temperature and stay there. Last winter, I bought a few that were rated for 85F. They have different ratings. I paid about $10 for 3 of them on Amazon.

The cheap ones just get hotter and hotter, often exceeding 100F. I wouldn't use those.
 

Kodi

Title Master
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Jul 27, 2012
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Honestly with good packing insulating the T's, I wouldn't worry about it.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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I'm having my Ts shipped from Pennsylvania to Seattle. The overnights lows next week here are in the mid 40s, but it's a good bit warmer in PA. Is a heat pack necessary here? I would have them overnighted, and I'm not sure how cool the shipping environment is kept but they wouldn't be sitting out overnight here or anything. I'm just really stressed about them getting too cold, but I also don't want to cook them to death. :(
If you are shipping via FedEx, you can find out the cargo temps on the plane via the internet actually.
 

Bugmom

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May 28, 2012
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I'm having my Ts shipped from Pennsylvania to Seattle. The overnights lows next week here are in the mid 40s, but it's a good bit warmer in PA. Is a heat pack necessary here? I would have them overnighted, and I'm not sure how cool the shipping environment is kept but they wouldn't be sitting out overnight here or anything. I'm just really stressed about them getting too cold, but I also don't want to cook them to death. :(
I personally would want a heat pack, because I've had overnight shipments get lost. Also, hello from a fellow Pacific NWer.
 

CakeLore

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Jul 12, 2013
Messages
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Do
Well, some heat packs reach a certain temperature and stay there. Last winter, I bought a few that were rated for 85F. They have different ratings. I paid about $10 for 3 of them on Amazon.

The cheap ones just get hotter and hotter, often exceeding 100F. I wouldn't use those.
Do you recall which ones they were exactly? I've purchased one but it gets to 100F and I was wary of using it.
 

CakeLore

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
105
Well, some heat packs reach a certain temperature and stay there. Last winter, I bought a few that were rated for 85F. They have different ratings. I paid about $10 for 3 of them on Amazon.

The cheap ones just get hotter and hotter, often exceeding 100F. I wouldn't use those.
Do you recall the name? I can't find d any cooler than 100
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
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Do


Do you recall which ones they were exactly? I've purchased one but it gets to 100F and I was wary of using it.
I don't recall the name, sorry. I agree though, so long as you insulate it well, you should be fine.
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
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Jun 12, 2016
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I live in the PNW, I work for the hometown Seattle airline (27 years), I've had a lot shipped to me and fully support the use of heat packs in fall, winter and spring. Not every cargo hold is climate controlled. I've worked airplane bellies in mid summer and it's like being in a refrigerator while I unloaded it . Not every box is created the same. Heat packs should be wrapped in newspaper to spread the heat and not make it concentrated. I've never had a box that was "cooking" when I opened it.
If you're really concerned, use a smaller heat pack.
 

CakeLore

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Jul 12, 2013
Messages
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I'm shipping FedEx which seems to claim they keep their cargo holds at room temperature (15-25C). They now seem to be predicting slightly warmer weather for next week, with a low of 52F on Wednesday (when they'd be arriving). My door faces west and since I might not get to them until the afternoon I worry they'd be in the sun with a heat pack. Given all that I think I'm going to omit the heat pack, so long as the weather forecast isn't in the 40s. Further reading has told me that tarantulas are much more likely to recover from being too cold than too hot. Thanks for your responses everyone, I'll let you know how it works out.
 

Gaherp

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Oct 27, 2007
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I have shipped alot over the years from darts to t's and with a well insulated box a phase 22 gel pack works great with those temps. Using them with a 72 hr heatpack or just the heat pack alone will work also.
I do not ship 2 or 3 day fedex just to be in the safe side. I will say though for the few packages that were held over in bad weather I never lost an animal. I think skimping on insulation is the biggest problem. I use very thick styro and it keeps the temps stable. Also using 24 hour heat packs in smaller boxes tends to run a bit hot. Going with a longer running heatpack works better. Making sure your heatpack is either affixed to one side or packed well will make sure it does not shift during shipping potentially cooking your animals. Had an adult trio of green and bronze aurates arrive cooked and very stinky due to a free moving heatpack.
 

RobynTRR

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May 7, 2012
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Gaherp has a great suggestion in using the Phase 22 packs for T shipping. For a second choice I also agree with the 72 hour heat pack. It has a lower peak temperature than other shipping heat packs. Keep in mind the max heat pack temp is relative, as the surface temp of the heat pack is different than the ambient heat it will create in the package. You would never want a heat pack in direct contact with your animal container/deli cup, that is a recipe for DOAs.

The shorter the duration the heat pack, the HIGHER the temp it reaches. The 72s are the MILDEST. For reptile shipping, we only recommend 40 hour heat packs or above. The 24 hour heat packs peak quite a bit higher. The hand warmers that you find in sporting goods stores and convenience stores are the WORST choice. Those peak in the 180F range. Those should never be used for live shipping, whether reptiles or inverts.

As for the FedEx planes, they are pressurized, and temperature controlled, within a range of 55-75F.
 

CakeLore

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
105
I have shipped alot over the years from darts to t's and with a well insulated box a phase 22 gel pack works great with those temps. Using them with a 72 hr heatpack or just the heat pack alone will work also.
I do not ship 2 or 3 day fedex just to be in the safe side. I will say though for the few packages that were held over in bad weather I never lost an animal. I think skimping on insulation is the biggest problem. I use very thick styro and it keeps the temps stable. Also using 24 hour heat packs in smaller boxes tends to run a bit hot. Going with a longer running heatpack works better. Making sure your heatpack is either affixed to one side or packed well will make sure it does not shift during shipping potentially cooking your animals. Had an adult trio of green and bronze aurates arrive cooked and very stinky due to a free moving heatpack.
Gaherp has a great suggestion in using the Phase 22 packs for T shipping. For a second choice I also agree with the 72 hour heat pack. It has a lower peak temperature than other shipping heat packs. Keep in mind the max heat pack temp is relative, as the surface temp of the heat pack is different than the ambient heat it will create in the package. You would never want a heat pack in direct contact with your animal container/deli cup, that is a recipe for DOAs.

The shorter the duration the heat pack, the HIGHER the temp it reaches. The 72s are the MILDEST. For reptile shipping, we only recommend 40 hour heat packs or above. The 24 hour heat packs peak quite a bit higher. The hand warmers that you find in sporting goods stores and convenience stores are the WORST choice. Those peak in the 180F range. Those should never be used for live shipping, whether reptiles or inverts.

As for the FedEx planes, they are pressurized, and temperature controlled, within a range of 55-75F.
Thanks for the advice guys. You might have see my post here http://arachnoboards.com/threads/shipping-gone-wrong-very-concerned.288145/ that they were accidentally shipped via ground by my parents and I'm now just praying that they make it.
 
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