Scorpion lifespans

Extensionofgreen

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I am aware that lifespans can be altered by food quantity, temperatures, gender, species, and other factors, but I was curious as to what are some rather short lived species and what are some relatively long lived species?
I've read the care parameters for most of my acquisitions, but there don't seem to be many resources for average life expectancy of the majority of species.
 

Smokehound714

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depends on the species. some genera rarely live longer than two years, several vaejovidae are a good example
 

ArachnoDrew

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There's such a vast range in life span . It would almost he better to narrow down a select few that you feel you would be interested in
 

Extensionofgreen

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I'm mostly looking at buthids, for the moment. Androctonus bicolor and Androctonus crassicaudus, Tityus anthenses, L.q., Rhopalorus garridoi and junceus, Parabuthus transvaalicus and liosoma, and Hottentotta jayakari.

Most of them are on their way and I like to have an idea. I'm hoping they aren't terribly short-lived and also not terribly slow to mature. I guess I just want it all! :happy:
 

ArachnoDrew

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I don't have experience with either of those specifically other than jayakari and jayakri is a very slow grower. I have Androctonus Australis that grows decent quick. My p Transvaalicus is growing SUPER fast.... temperature has a lot to do with growth.. but all the scorps listed above will live a while... I don't know of too many scorps that have a real short life span. And short for scorps is Still a few years
 

ArachnoDrew

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Np. Especially if what your buying now is not fully matured, chances are it will be long lived as long as no other reason for casualty occures. Appropriate housing. Temperature and humidity are all the keys to a happy scorp
 

Jason Brantley

Arachnoknight
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That's a pretty good question. I suppose you could have one Androctonus crassicauda that lived for five years and one that lived for three years from the same shipment. The Androctonus crassicaudas I had died in about three years if I remember correctly. But they were wild caught, so they could have been like 9 1/2 years old you know?
 

darkness975

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Hadrurus arizonensis (and pallidus and spadix and what not) is a pretty long lived species from what I have seen and read. Most of mine were acquired as adults and they are still going almost 6 years later. I have read that they can live up to 20 - 25 years. I am curious to see if that happens.

My sub adult is still a sub adult and has not even attempted to molt since I have had it.
 

Extensionofgreen

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I know that many desert Ts are long-lived and slower to mature, but I wasn't sure that carried to scorpions.
I guess phrases like "short-lived", "long-lived", and "slow or fast to mature" are relative.
For me, anything over 5 years on average, is reasonably long, though I am well aware some species can live decades.
By comparison, a short-lived species would expire at 3 years or sooner.
Slow to mature for me is something requiring more than 2 years to reach breeding maturity. I expect most scorpion mature within a year to 3 years, but I don't know enough about specific species, until I work with them.

Regarding care parameters, I NEVER do the minimum in anything I do. I currently raise my own feeders and make their gutload myself, from well researched, human-grade sources. I have about 9 species of roaches, and while I don't breed crickets, I feed them on my own feeds for several days, before offering them to my charges. I have big plans for a large collections of inverts. I have missed the simplicity in keeping them and the variety to be found in a section of the exotics hobby that requires much less space and care than reptiles, fish, and other things that are easy to love, but hard to manage, with work and life consuming more and more of your time.
 

Extensionofgreen

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[QUOTE="darkness975, post: 2645882,
My sub adult is still a sub adult and has not even attempted to molt since I have had it.[/QUOTE]

How long have you had the sub adult?
 

Red Eunice

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I am aware that lifespans can be altered by food quantity, temperatures, gender, species, and other factors, but I was curious as to what are some rather short lived species and what are some relatively long lived species?
I've read the care parameters for most of my acquisitions, but there don't seem to be many resources for average life expectancy of the majority of species.
Try the search function at Allscorpionarchives.com. Also Google, Tree of Life (?) and search there. Lots of info on both sites if you can't find it here.
 

Smokehound714

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Hadrurus arizonensis (and pallidus and spadix and what not) is a pretty long lived species from what I have seen and read. Most of mine were acquired as adults and they are still going almost 6 years later. I have read that they can live up to 20 - 25 years. I am curious to see if that happens.

My sub adult is still a sub adult and has not even attempted to molt since I have had it.
arizonensis=pallidus. pallidus is a junior synonym of arizonensis and is not a valid species. Hadrurus arizonensis austrinus is the only known subspecies of arizonensis
 

darkness975

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arizonensis=pallidus. pallidus is a junior synonym of arizonensis and is not a valid species. Hadrurus arizonensis austrinus is the only known subspecies of arizonensis
Yeah that's why I quoted it in parentheses.

Nevertheless, our native desert dwellers seem to be some of the longer lived species than many of the others.

Does the color variation have to do with elevation or some other environmental Factor?
 

Smokehound714

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Yeah that's why I quoted it in parentheses.

Nevertheless, our native desert dwellers seem to be some of the longer lived species than many of the others.

Does the color variation have to do with elevation or some other environmental Factor?
It's a phenotypical variation caused by their environment and natural selection.
darker scorpions are found in areas with volcanic soils, dark soil types, etc. Paler scorpions are found in mostly sandy areas, especially dunes and washes.

nearly every scorpion in north america has a dark form and a pallid form.
 
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