Scientific Name?

Thiscordia

Arachnobaron
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Hi guys someone mentiones to me a East African Spitting Scorpion
anyone has ever heard about this scorpion before?
And if yes do you know what the scientific name?
Fo the Spitting scorpion part i guess its should be some Parabuthus spp.
Thanks guys.
-.Raul
 

~Abyss~

Arachnoking
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can't rember right now....umm. I'll go with P.trans too.
 

looper

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Parabuthus transvaalicus (common names include black spitting thicktail scorpion, South African fattail scorpion, South African giant fat tail and South African spitting scorpion) is one of the largest scorpions in the family Buthidae.

It is one of the most venomous scorpions on the African continent and is therefore dangerous to humans. The spitting scorpion has relatively small pincers using instead its ability to spray venom over 1 metre as its main defence.

This species of scorpion grows to a length of 12 cm (5 inches) and they are commonly seen in black and brown or chocolate-brown. This species is a desert/scrubland scorpion and is found in Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique under logs and stones.

think thats the one!
 

EAD063

Arachnoprince
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P trans is not very prevalent on the eastern side of Africa... not at all. Only reportedly occuring in Mozambique on the eastern side. However, P leisoma occurs throughout the entire eastern territories. With that information, one would assume it's either P leisoma, or another rare Parabuthus from that locale. Of course once you can get a photo of the specimen, I know will be able to determine if it's common or not. But not to many P trans in that area. Best of luck attaining them Raul.

Ed
 

Thiscordia

Arachnobaron
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First of all thanks to all the ones that have replied to this thread.


P trans is not very prevalent on the eastern side of Africa... not at all. Only reportedly occuring in Mozambique on the eastern side. However, P leisoma occurs throughout the entire eastern territories. With that information, one would assume it's either P leisoma, or another rare Parabuthus from that locale. Of course once you can get a photo of the specimen, I know will be able to determine if it's common or not. But not to many P trans in that area. Best of luck attaining them Raul.

Ed
I agree Ed...
Because the P. liosoma ,P. maximus and P. pallidus are mostly in Tanzania and in Mossambique P.mossambicensis but very few P. transvaalicus.
Mostof the south african countries though...have a way more Parabuthus species including transvaalicus.
That's why i have been curious since i red in a NON reliable pricelist the East African Spitting Scorpion.
And since most of this guys just export whatever scorpion they find and give them weird names...I have been curious about this particular spp.
Butso far No Pics i havebeen asking for pics to all of the africans exporters that list this spp. but no luck so far.
That's why iposted this thread hoping that someone had already ordered this spp. and can confirm the real ID.

Thanks for posting guys.

-.Raul
 
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EAD063

Arachnoprince
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Glad to see we were on the same track Raul. It doesn't make much sense to call it an "eastern" scorpion, since all it's listed habitats, close to the eastern portion of the continent are about as far south on Africa as you can be. But obviously, more obscure names have been constructed by those guys. Let's just hope it's truley from the a costal territory, the more north the better :), and not east of the collectors house. {D

Ed
 

Brian S

ArachnoGod
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Parabuthus transvaalicus (common names include black spitting thicktail scorpion, South African fattail scorpion, South African giant fat tail and South African spitting scorpion) is one of the largest scorpions in the family Buthidae.
If one must use common names then "fat tail" should be used to describe Androctonus while "thick tail" should be used to describe Parabuthus. Naturally we all need to get away from these common names
 

Selenops

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If one must use common names then "fat tail" should be used to describe Androctonus while "thick tail" should be used to describe Parabuthus. Naturally we all need to get away from these common names
Absolutely, I used to doggedly google for rare Buthids and other scorpions, and encounter importer/exporter wholesale lists and found some crazy names.

I couldn't make heads and tails of them, is this a European trade common name? Is it a locality common name? Or is it a trapper with just enough knowledge of scorpions to piece together a half sensible common name?

Much better to have the scientific than anything else that usually cuts the butter. That and an accurate ID.
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
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Like the others said before, they mean P.liosoma by it :rolleyes: This one occurs in Eastern Africa (Tanzania) and is not uncommon in the hobby.
Did I mention before I hate these stupid common names? :confused: :evil:
 

skinheaddave

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Just as a side-note, the species of Parabuthus known to spray venom (the spitting bit) are: P. kraepelini, P. mossambicensis, P. raudus, P. schleichteri, P. transvaalicus and P. villosus (according to Newlands, I believe). So one has to consider which part of the common name you consider less reliable -- the spitting bit or the locale. Of course there is always the chance that both are wrong.

Cheers,
Dave
 

skinheaddave

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Like the others said before, they mean P.liosoma by it :rolleyes:
How did you reach this conclusion? You say everything with such certainty that I am never sure which of your statements are backed by experience or paper and which are purely speculation. I intend no offence by this comment -- I suspect it is a language thing not actually arrogance.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Kugellager

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Just as a side-note, the species of Parabuthus known to spray venom (the spitting bit) are: P. kraepelini, P. mossambicensis, P. raudus, P. schleichteri, P. transvaalicus and P. villosus (according to Newlands, I believe). So one has to consider which part of the common name you consider less reliable -- the spitting bit or the locale. Of course there is always the chance that both are wrong.

Cheers,
Dave
I also believe Jonathan Leemings book "Scorpions of Southern Africa" mentions some of the other Parabuthids that have the ability to 'squirt' venom. I would check my copy to confirm but its packed away somewhere.

This is an excellent book by the way. If you don't have it yet I highly recommend it.

John
];')
 

skinheaddave

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John,

He mentions it for a few species in his species summary section. It is not, however, mentioned for all of the species on the Newlands list, nor is it mentioned for any species not on that list.

And yes, it is fantastic book.

Cheers,
Dave
 

~Abyss~

Arachnoking
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I also believe Jonathan Leemings book "Scorpions of Southern Africa" mentions some of the other Parabuthids that have the ability to 'squirt' venom. I would check my copy to confirm but its packed away somewhere.

This is an excellent book by the way. If you don't have it yet I highly recommend it.

John
];')
I've had a WC P.silvestrii from here in cali. that squited venom at me. I posted somewhere a few weeks ago I believe.
 

skinheaddave

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I've had a WC P.silvestrii from here in cali. that squited venom at me. I posted somewhere a few weeks ago I believe.
I shall have to look that up. If you do a search, you will find at least a couple threads about non-parabuthids spraying. H.arizonensis is said to be able to do so -- but there is some debate about spraying vs. "flinging" or whatnot. Definitely an interesting area.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Thiscordia

Arachnobaron
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I agree with all of you guys...
The only reason i associated the spitting with Parabuthus is the location (East Africa). Although its more common to hear thick tails in the forums... In Tanzania liosomas are called black tail scorpions :D even though just the last segments are black not the whole tail.
And along the way each exporter renames the species just to make it sound good in the pricelist :)
Once again i'm glad we use mostly scientific names.
Thanks for posting guys.
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
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How did you reach this conclusion? You say everything with such certainty that I am never sure which of your statements are backed by experience or paper and which are purely speculation. I intend no offence by this comment -- I suspect it is a language thing not actually arrogance.

Cheers,
Dave
Good question Dave,

You are absolutely right asking.
It is not a language thing. When I think I am right, I have no reason to bring forth my opinion in an unsure way. When someone proves me wrong and has good arguments, I correct my opinion.
I have seen several adds (of unreliable people, especially some African guys, please watch out guys), wherein this common name was mentioned and behind it, P.leiosoma..I have seen it several times, that's why I was so confident in answering this question. No arrogance intended (this time ;) ).
I don't keep track of these IMO shady adds, otherwise I could have dropped some links here...
 

skinheaddave

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When I think I am right, I have no reason to bring forth my opinion in an unsure way.
Well, as long as you don't mind being questioned, then I suppose I have no substantial problem with your attitude. It would be easier for all concerned, though, if you provided some background to your posts. In this case, for example, you could have mentioned that you've seen the common and scientific name linked up on several price lists. That way we could all decide how much weight to give your argument (in this case substantial weight, as it would strongly suggest that it is going to be P.leiosoma .. but not as much weight as you give it since you don't actually know for sure).

Cheers,
Dave
 
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