saved a T but know nothing

Archimed

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 5, 2007
Messages
3
ive just got a T from someone who was gonna throw it outside so i kinda took it mostly for the life of the T ^^ so ive got a few Question for those who want to help me,

1- I think it's a G. Rosea but not quite sure cause it dosnt look a lot like the pic you have, she have a Black skin,all the hair are white and she have a little of pink near his eyes.she's around 4,4.5 long

2- A 10 gallons US is too much for my T?

3- I wanted to recreate his house to look the mostly like where it come from but int the rosea caresheet it say its from Atacama Desert so i guess it have a lot of sand there but somewhere else on this forum ive seen sand is not a good idea for the T so someone can explain this one to me ???

4- I have 3 aquarium(for fish) ,2 33 gal and 1 50 gal in the same room where my T is,does it provide too much humidity?

i think thats it for now,thank in advandce for those who will help me.
 

Skulnik

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
80
Hello! First off, It's awesome what you're doing! Careful though, it's addictive. I held my first T. two months ago, bought my first T. one month ago, and got three more young Ts yesterday!

I'm still kind of new to this, but based on the description you provided I'd say it is not a G. Rosea. Rosies have light grey setae (hairs) on the legs, brownish hairs on the abdomen and a striking metallic pink carapace. I'm not sure what you have, but it sounds very cool. (the darker the better, I think)

A ten gallon is great for your T. Assuming it is a ground dwelling spider, floor space is more important than height. A fall of more than a 5 or 6 inches can seriously injure your new pet.

You can prevent a fall from this height by putting about 6 inches of POTTING SOIL or VERMICULITE on the bottom of the tank for substrate. I prefer soil, but make sure there's no Miracle GRO or any other extra chemicals to feed plants. Soil is cheap, looks better and has an overall healthier feel to it in my opinion. Try to make the terrain interesting to the T. Make it uneven, little hills and what not. Be creative; its like a little dollhouse for crazy spider lovers.

Don't use sand, as it will dry out your T. They don't require a ton of humidity (unless its a tree dwelling T, then it may require a bit more), but anywhere between 60 - 80% is OK. As long as its consistent and there is no mold building in the substrate.

Make sure it has a little water dish, nothing too deep, a clean jar top is OK for starters. Give it about 4 fat crickets week and you'll have a happy, healthy T. in no time.

You can get creative with feeding, using mealworms, waxworms, superworms, beetles, cockroaches, other spiders etc...nothing that can kick your spider's butt, but...you get the picture.

Also - make sure that if you catch it, it's not from an area that's been sprayed with pesticides.

Man, have fun with it. Poor little T. Let us know if you have any more questions. We're all more than willing to help!

Ciao,
Skully
 

KJE

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 21, 2004
Messages
808
Can you post a pic of the t? Not that we can give you a definate ID from a pic, but it might help a little.

At that size it really doesn't need that large of an enclosure, unless that's just what you have on hand.

For substrate I use peat moss. Just make sure the level between the top of the enclosure and the substrate is about the same as the t's length. That should help prevent injuries due to falls.

Give the t a lid or dish with water and something to hide in.

Also, good job on saving the t!
 

IdahoBiteyThing

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 2, 2007
Messages
599
So far so good!

Congrats on the new T! You're getting good advice so far! I would add that IF it IS a G. rosea, that you keep the substrate (I like either peat or coco fiber, but fertilizer-free potting soil works too) very dry. A picture would help immensely- we might not get the exact species, but could at least get close enough to help you with cultural needs. If it's a rosie, no need to mist or dampen this T's enclosure. I have aquariums in my T room too, and no, they don't add an excessive amount of humidity- some but not too much. Not sure what part of the world you're in, but where I'm from it's pretty dry, so even with about 250 gallons worth of aquariums in my T room, the humidity rarely if ever gets up past 40-50%. Good luck! Tony
 

Archimed

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 5, 2007
Messages
3
thank a lot for the advice but one more thing ,about her color maybe its cause she is about to molt ?? i really dont know a thing about T as you can see and can it have some color variation like fish like mine have a black or very dark brown ''skin'' and less pink hair and some can be brown with a lot of pink hair

and i think im already addicted ive got her for 1 week and i already want another lol ^^
 

jr47

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
597
my rosea gets very dark and drab before a molt but no white hairs.
i do think its almost impossible to own just one. the more you get, the more you want.
pics if possible would be the only way to really id it.
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Messages
5,450
Black or very dark skin indicates an upcoming molt. A female rosea will be basically grey to brown all over with a faint pink or coppery tinge to the carapace (the part where the legs attach and the eye cluster is) A male rosea will probably have a much more pronounced pink/coppery color to the carapace. Both will have faint striping on the legs.

Like they said above, a picture would be very helpful for ID.
 

lunixweb

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 15, 2007
Messages
333
Hello! First off, It's awesome what you're doing! Careful though, it's addictive. I held my first T. two months ago, bought my first T. one month ago, and got three more young Ts yesterday!

I'm still kind of new to this, but based on the description you provided I'd say it is not a G. Rosea. Rosies have light grey setae (hairs) on the legs, brownish hairs on the abdomen and a striking metallic pink carapace. I'm not sure what you have, but it sounds very cool. (the darker the better, I think)

A ten gallon is great for your T. Assuming it is a ground dwelling spider, floor space is more important than height. A fall of more than a 5 or 6 inches can seriously injure your new pet.

You can prevent a fall from this height by putting about 6 inches of POTTING SOIL or VERMICULITE on the bottom of the tank for substrate. I prefer soil, but make sure there's no Miracle GRO or any other extra chemicals to feed plants. Soil is cheap, looks better and has an overall healthier feel to it in my opinion. Try to make the terrain interesting to the T. Make it uneven, little hills and what not. Be creative; its like a little dollhouse for crazy spider lovers.

Don't use sand, as it will dry out your T. They don't require a ton of humidity (unless its a tree dwelling T, then it may require a bit more), but anywhere between 60 - 80% is OK. As long as its consistent and there is no mold building in the substrate.

Make sure it has a little water dish, nothing too deep, a clean jar top is OK for starters. Give it about 4 fat crickets week and you'll have a happy, healthy T. in no time.

You can get creative with feeding, using mealworms, waxworms, superworms, beetles, cockroaches, other spiders etc...nothing that can kick your spider's butt, but...you get the picture.

Also - make sure that if you catch it, it's not from an area that's been sprayed with pesticides.

Man, have fun with it. Poor little T. Let us know if you have any more questions. We're all more than willing to help!

Ciao,
Skully
I would tell u the same :}
 
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