Rubbing spinnerets on Dubia?

runCMD

Arachnopeon
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Jan 21, 2017
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36
Feel silly starting a thread for this but had a question about my new T and couldn't seem to find the answer with searches. Fed my LP a dubia today(that actually seemed to still be somewhat alive after even 15mins in the clutches). After a while, it put the roach down and turned around. I though I may have disturbed it by getting too close or something. However it then proceeded to run spinnerets all over the roach. After a few rotations it turned back around, picked it up, and started working its fangs in on it again. Can anyone tell me what this was for? I didn't see any webbing to speak of but that's not to say there wasn't any.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
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Feb 22, 2014
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My T's do this all the time. I believe it's just to make sure that the prey isn't going to be moving around while eating it. Keeps it together so the T can ewt it all, otherwise it may lose bits and pieces while eating it :D Probably very light webbing (not sure i they can control the heaviness of their webbing). Pretty normal, my B. albo juvie loves to bag up his meal before he really tears into it ;)
 

runCMD

Arachnopeon
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Jan 21, 2017
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That's what I assumed I just wasn't sure Ts did that with their food.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
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Feb 22, 2014
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I used to get nervous with that too :D Always assumed that it hadn't eaten it, then it picks it up :( Such strife ;)
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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Ts are spiders, of course they web up their food. Silk strands are used for many purposes, some we don't even know the exact function of why it's being used.

If you want to see a truly WILD use of webbing, look up "spitting spider", and video of them too.
 
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viper69

ArachnoGod
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A close second is the ogre-faced or net-casting spider (Deinopidae).
I know about those as well. I always thought the spitter was far more interesting when you think about what has to occur for all of that to happen, to me at least. Then again, casting a web net, is pretty wild too.
 

chanda

Arachnoking
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Jun 27, 2010
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My T. stirmi will sometimes web over larger prey like roaches, though I've never seen her bother with crickets. They're spiders. It's just what they do.
 

cold blood

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That's how a bolus is made...its held together by webbing and its used liberally while feeding.
 

cold blood

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A close second is the ogre-faced or net-casting spider (Deinopidae).
I put that first...that's a very unique way to utilize webbing...I mean, so is spitting, but casting a net like they do just seems so human and not so much invertebrate...its basically creating a tool with web, and then using that tool for a job. Fascinating.
 
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