Raw/Bald spot on Theraphosa blondi??

Snakes13

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
9
So, I just got my first Theraphosa blondi (Goliath Birdeater). had a pet store order a female in and picked it up, She seemed healthy from what I saw in the pet shop, she was eating so I didn't want to mess with her too much. After getting her home (the pet store was nice enough to let me take the tank home and bring it back when my box of bugs and other orders came in in a few days) I noticed this bald spot on her abdomen. I did some reading on it, and from what I gather it is common when they get stressed to kick hair off. However this doesn't look like a bald spot, but rather raw. The 2 days after bringing her home she ate/ killed 5 large crickets, and a week later she ate 3 more. Seems healthy, but did notice she like to hunker in one spot, and after she moves she sits back down. The cage is a 20 gallon, the temp goes from 83 during the day to no lower than 78 at night (a hot side that never goes below 80) with about 70-80% humidity. Should I be worried, or just wait for her molt, any information would be great, I'm fairly new to the spider hobby, but an experienced pet keeper. I know I gave a lot of information, but I want to make sure she healthy and happy. Here is a pic, I know its not the best, I'm getting a HD cam today to try and get more uploaded today. This pic is from the day I got her, the spot has grown a bit, but not too much, the color of the exposed spot is a little pinkish but hasn't changed, just the edge around it has turned a little darker on the healthy parts.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=1795686&l=d198f9f15f&id=1314450038
 

GPulchra

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 21, 2010
Messages
279
It's from flicking hairs. Theraphosa as a genus is known for its notorious flicking. Also, it is very hard to ID from that far away, but you may have the Theraphosa sp. Burgundy.
 

Snakes13

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
9
Thats what I thought too at first, I feel a little better now but, I never disturb her and haven't seen her flick fairs, and I'm the only one that enters their room. Here is a better Picture of the spot.
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=1853099&l=10db77a316&id=1314450038



Also, thanks for the head up on the Theraphosa sp. Burgundy, they just had Theraphosa (birdeater) on their order sheet. this is a link to her album, Thanks I never thought I get a response that quick. http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=91809&id=1314450038&l=209495657e
 

GPulchra

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 21, 2010
Messages
279
I don't have one of the Theraphosas, so don't take my word for it when I say this. It looks a bit weird, but I still say from urticating hairs. The middle part is definitely from urticating hairs.
 

snakecollector

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
138
{D She looks like she kicked off every hair she owns!!
I have had them do that, not fun. She will be just fine.

John
 

Stan Schultz

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Messages
1,678
So, I just got my first Theraphosa blondi (Goliath Birdeater). ...
Not a good choice for a relative newbie.

Read http://people.ucalgary.ca/~schultz/stansrant.html. Take heed of whatever wisdom you can extract, but definitely read Sam Marshall's book and TKG3. (Sorry for the unabashed, self-serving, plug, but you can check them out of your friendly, local, public library for free.) Both have a lot of information about caring for tarantulas, especially goliaths.

Then, perform a search of these forums using the following search string.

goliath OR blondi

Copy-and-paste the string as is or type it in directly. Be sure to retain the capital "OR."

Also, be sure to put on another pot of coffee or stock up on your other favorite beverage. Clear you schedule as well. You have a lot of reading to do.

... The cage is a 20 gallon, ...
Twenty high or twenty long? Twenty long is better. More floor space for a huge tarantula and not so tall. Goliaths like to climb, but are only really good at falling. In a tall cage they usually only do that once, splat like a ripe tomato, and die. YOU'VE BEEN WARNED!

If it's a 20H, buy another, flatter cage before you have to buy another tarantula. The distance between the top of the substrate and the top of the cage should not exceed the maximum leg span of the tarantula.

... the temp goes from 83 during the day to no lower than 78 at night (a hot side that never goes below 80) ...
Temperature is almost irrelevant as long as you're comfortable. In spite of all you're likely to read on these forums, goliaths are not very sensitive to temperature. And, it might very likely live longer for you at 72 or 74 F without the heater.

... with about 70-80% humidity. ...
WAY TO LOW! Wild caught, imported goliaths need 100% relative humidity until at least their first molt in captivity. Cover all the open area of the tank with plastic food wrap to hold the humidity in. Use a very large water dish or two smaller ones.

... Should I be worried, or just wait for her molt, ...
About the bald spot? No.

About her dying? Very much so. My guess is that half or more die within the first 6 months of importation. Almost all are dead within two years.

... I'm fairly new to the spider hobby, but an experienced pet keeper. ...
That won't help you. Spiders are weird. Their evolutionary line split off from ours over 600 million years ago. Any similarities between them and any other pets you may have had are either so very, VERY, VERY old that you barely know they exist, or are pure coincidence. They operate by their own set of rules.

You really need to read all four of those books, preferably soonest, so you can fundamentally understand how and why you need to forget animal care as you know it and learn how to take care of a tarantula.

A goliath was not a very wise choice. A Brazilian salmon (Lasiodora parahybana) would've been a much better choice. Prettier, hardier, cheaper, the same size, the same or better temperament. Nowhere near as itchy!

After you've done your reading, all of us on this forum would be overjoyed to give you all the help and advice we can. It's the initial, steep part of the learning curve that is the tough part. And the part that requires your intense, personal participation.

Best of luck.
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
1,533
Temperature is almost irrelevant as long as you're comfortable. In spite of all you're likely to read on these forums, goliaths are not very sensitive to temperature. And, it might very likely live longer for you at 72 or 74 F .

Disagree.
I would like to know how and why this sp will do better at that temperature when, in nature, they live at a constant low-mid 80's. Why would it be better, how would it be beneficial.Scientifically speaking.

In many years keeping Theraphosa genus,lower temps only have slow them down and make them more of a rock in a terrarium.
Longer pre molts, less prey voracious, slower growth...In general, less animal and more of a Mineral kingdome creature.
,

WAY TO LOW! Wild caught, imported goliaths need 100% relative humidity until at least their first molt in captivity. Cover all the open area of the tank with plastic food wrap to hold the humidity in. Use a very large water dish or two smaller ones.
.



Fully agree. Althought ventilation is crucial.
 
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