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Questions: internal anatomy.

whoami?

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 27, 2002
Messages
219
Well, since scorpions crap out of the ends of their "tails" (metasomas, right?), that means that they obviously must have vital organs in their metasomas.

But then I look at a Hadogenes, and I can't imagine anything but intestines fitting in such a thin metasoma.

A reasonable assumption, I would guess.

But then I look at an A bicolor or a P transvalicus, and the tail is hella thick.

Now, onto the questions. Do extremely fat-tailed and extremely thin-tailed scorpions have the same basic internal anatomy? Does a fat-tailed scorpion have organs in its tail that would be located elsewhere in a thin-tailed scorpion? Or is the excess fatness of fat-tailed scorpions' tails due solely to excess musculkature (and maybe a thicker exoskeleton)?
 

Reitz

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2003
Messages
339
Anyone else please feel free to chime in on this. I am working with a VERY limited knowledge.

From what I understand (and please, take this with a huge grain of salt), the size of the metasoma depends on the type of venom being produced. Scorpions with big fat 'tails' usually have a higher capacity for salt-based pain toxins. Thinner tailed buthids produce less of the salene solution and more of the neurotoxin, which takes up less space. Because the salene storage/production takes space, it also requires that the delivery system be stronger so that the scorp is able to strike quickly. This is where the 'musculature' comes in. Deathstalkers, because they produce less of the salene, have lighter metasomas, so they don't need the high-powered delivery system.

This information came from a web site a while back. I have no idea how factual it is. The web site is now down, and for all I know it was a 12 year old in his basement (with a sophistocated vocabulary!). Please don't flame me if the info is incorrect. It's just what I've read.

Chris
 

Bry

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
773
I believe I once read somewhere that scorpions produce toxins from their prey. Similar to how wild poison dart frogs eat certain species of prey that help them produce their toxins. Perhaps this is true for scorps, and the body somehow separates chemicals for venom usage or defectation. Which might be why the telson and the "craphole", for lack of a better term, are so close to each other. Anyway, this is just a wild guess. Remember, grain of salt...grain of salt. :)

Bry
 

Reitz

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2003
Messages
339
No, that's actually not the case. A scorpion's venom will strenghten or weaken depending on climate and food, but the change is slight.

That's true with poison arrow frogs, but not scorps.

Peace,
Chris
 

skinheaddave

SkorpionSkin
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 15, 2002
Messages
4,343
"Scorpion Biology" by G.A. Polis makes no mention of variations in internal anatomy. Certainly, the basic layout of the organs is identical. It should be noted, however, that the parabuthids capable of spraying their venom have enlarged distal metasoma segments to house the additional musculature needed for such a feat.

Cheers,
Dave
 
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