Question About Acanthoscurria Genticulata

AshS

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Apr 21, 2017
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So I have an A. Geniculata sling about 1".
I have read a lot about this species being rather defensive and sometimes "bitey" even as slings, however I have had mine about 3 weeks now and only seen her flick once, and that was the first day I got him/her. He/She also doesn't immediately attack any thing that moves and will quite happily walk strait into my hand. Is this "defensivness" somthing that comes as they get older? 20170421_193611.jpg 20170422_223807.jpg
 

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Arachnomaniac19

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It really depends on the T. Mine had its fiestiness at that size. Also, prepare to get some comments on handling ethics.
 

Ungoliant

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Is this "defensivness" somthing that comes as they get older?
My sling has always been a ravenous murderbot, even when she was only half an inch. However, she doesn't seem inclined to flick hairs so far.

Individual tarantulas can always vary from the usual temperament for their species, and it's possible for an individual's temperament to change over time.

It can't do much damage at that size, but as it grows, I would not plan to handle a geniculata. You never know when your fingers might look like food. If you want something that you can occasionally handle, get a Grammostola or Euathlus.
 

The Grym Reaper

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A lot of people mistake their "anything that moves is food until I prove otherwise" attitude for defensiveness and subsequently label this species as "semi-aggressive" which I think is 100% bovine faecal matter.

A lot of A. geniculata I've seen (including my adult female) will calmly walk away from something once they realise they can't eat it, they might kick hairs if you persistently annoy them, I've never seen a threat posture from mine.

I have seen people handle adults but, to be brutally honest, I wouldn't handle mine if you paid me, she's a big girl with big gnashers and I don't fancy having those plunged into my flesh.
 

Nightstalker47

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They aren't all that defensive generally but handling them is like playing with fire. They could be calm one day and erratic the next. Dont get too accustomed to this behavior, it may seem docile now but if you get into the habit of sticking your hands in there expecting a friendly spider your going to be surprised one day. These things are notorious for mistaking everything for food, quite a voracious T that you do not want thinking your it's next meal.
 

AshS

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I have seen people handle adults but, to be brutally honest, I wouldn't handle mine if you paid me, she's a big girl with big gnashers and I don't fancy having those plunged into my flesh.
Couldn't agree more. I'm well aware of the mechanical damage that a large spider can cause. Rest assured that it won't be handled when it's bigger.
 

Andrea82

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I have ten slings of this species.
When I open their vials/cups, 3 or 4 just scrunch up where they are, 3 run back in their tunnels and 3 start responding to air movement/spotcleaning/watering/food immediately. And there is 1 who either scrunches up or stands tall and make a threatpose, actually slapping the substrate.
Now, at 1 cm dls, that's cute and funny, but when it's 20cm dls, that's going to be way more threatening....
 

Trenor

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So I have an A. Genticulata sling about 1".
I have read a lot about this species being rather defensive and sometimes "bitey" even as slings, however I have had mine about 3 weeks now and only seen her flick once, and that was the first day I got him/her. He/She also doesn't immediately attack any thing that moves and will quite happily walk strait into my hand. Is this "defensivness" somthing that comes as they get older? View attachment 238115 View attachment 238116
At 1" mine was a lot more timid then it is now. Smaller slings are usually more discriminate on what they strike at. It's a good 4.5 inches now and you wouldn't want to put any fleshy parts anywhere near him. I moved him this weekend and he thumped the brush and even once wrapped it up holding onto it and popping it multiple times. None of the other 8 Ts rehoused this weekend (including 3 baboons) bit at the brush or even threat posed.

A lot of people mistake their "anything that moves is food until I prove otherwise" attitude for defensiveness and subsequently label this species as "semi-aggressive" which I think is 100% bovine faecal matter.

A lot of A. geniculata I've seen (including my adult female) will calmly walk away from something once they realise they can't eat it, they might kick hairs if you persistently annoy them, I've never seen a threat posture from mine.

I have seen people handle adults but, to be brutally honest, I wouldn't handle mine if you paid me, she's a big girl with big gnashers and I don't fancy having those plunged into my flesh.
Mine has popped tongs, paintbrushes and anything else I've put near it's enclosure. I agree most of those hits are likely from it thinking these things are food. However if you get popped by them due to it attacking or if it thought you were food really wouldn't matter after the fact.


IMO you should keep your fleshy bits away from these guys like you would any other T. Also be aware that they are likely to strike anything that goes into the enclosure.
 
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AshS

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They aren't all that defensive generally but handling them is like playing with fire. They could be calm one day and erratic the next. Dont get too accustomed to this behavior, it may seem docile now but if you get into the habit of sticking your hands in there expecting a friendly spider your going to be surprised one day. These things are notorious for mistaking everything for food, quite a voracious T that you do not want thinking your it's next meal.
I always test my T's mood with a paintbrush before maintenance. I used to have a juvi B. Auratum which launched herself at the tongs when I did maintenance
 

AshS

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Upon reading my own post again. I would like to correct my phone's auto correct mistake in changing "Geniculata" to "Genticulata" serves me right for not reading it back to myself
 

Trenor

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I always test my T's mood with a paintbrush before maintenance. I used to have a juvi B. Auratum which launched herself at the tongs when I did maintenance
I usually use tongs/forceps etc to do maintenance. I try not to put my hand anywhere near any T. That way regardless of their mood I'm still ok. :)
 

D Sherlod

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My genics 1.1.0 are aprox 3 and 1/2 inches
prior to their last molt they tagged anything that moved.

Since that molt they Ave become almost skittish avoiding tongs or paint brush.
they attack prey when it walks in front of them but avoid it when it jumps.
A complete change in attitude.

Honestly the new attitude scares me more
I find it much more unpredictable
 

Andrea82

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My genics 1.1.0 are aprox 3 and 1/2 inches
prior to their last molt they tagged anything that moved.

Since that molt they Ave become almost skittish avoiding tongs or paint brush.
they attack prey when it walks in front of them but avoid it when it jumps.
A complete change in attitude.

Honestly the new attitude scares me more
I find it much more unpredictable
Yeah, it is easier to deal with a T that is out right defensive than with one that can race out its enclosure at any given time. I rather rehouse my P.muticus than my P.pulcher....
 

Magenta

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I usually use tongs/forceps etc to do maintenance. I try not to put my hand anywhere near any T. That way regardless of their mood I'm still ok. :)
+1

This goes for all species, no matter how "docile". Any animal, even precious Flufferkins will defend itself if it feels threatened enough.
 

edesign

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Long ago, years ago, I began only using tools to do tank maintenance even with slings. I've seen too many instances of usually chill spiders suddenly reacting with slaps and strikes to enclosure invasions. Not worth a bite to save a few seconds and certainly not worth potentially flinging one across the room reflexively after a bite. Keep your fingers out :)

I've seen my two now 4" specimens try to destroy a water bowl I was pouring water in to. Pulling out underneath them, fangs scraping, just all-out murderous intent. Amongst other examples. I could not care less if they walk away after realizing it's not food...that is beside the point, a bite is a bite. Sharks will also swim away from non-food items...after taking a bite ;)
 
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