Promethea Moth Larvae?

Taceas

Arachnolord
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May 12, 2006
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Found these guys munching on one of our transplanted Tulip Poplar trees, and the only thing they resemble in my Peterson's Caterpillar Guide is the Promethea Moth larvae, but theirs had red-orange tubercles, and these guys have lemon yellow. The match the pattern and location of tubercles, exactly.

I just wanted to confirm that these are indeed Promethea Moths.



Does anyone have any ideas on how to rear these guys successfully? I don't have a shortage of tulip poplar trees and the other plants listed, so food is well taken care of. I was just mainly needing to know how to care for them when/while they are pupating.
 

Taceas

Arachnolord
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I think they're pretty much in all of the Eastern United States, from Southern Canada on down to Florida.

I've got them in a spare arboreal tarantula box, which allows me to put a whole branch of food in their for them. So far they're doing great, getting a little bigger. I can't wait till their front yellow tubercles turn fiery orange-red with their next instar.
 

Chrysopid

Arachnosquire
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That sounds awesome you have to give us an updated picture when that happens! :D
 

Black Widow88

Arachnobaron
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Lucky you! I remember saving a male promethea moth's life from drowning in the pool at camp in 2005. Almost all the scales were washed off and the wings were almost transparent. But you could still see some of the markings which told me it was a promethea moth.

That was the first time I ever saw one and it was a pleasure to have saved it. :D I'll save any insect from dying if I can. I can't bare to see them suffer, they're like my children!

Black Widow88
 

Ted

Arachnoprince
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i have bred and raised many large silkmoths..
just make sure that you keep a fresh food source..and a constant one.
keep the cage clean..remove all droppings daily.
remove any sick or weak individuals immediately.
also remove and black, wilted, or foliage if it has been defected on.
make sure no parasitic wasps can get to them.
keep their cage free of A/C, drafts, or big temperature fluctuations.
 

Taceas

Arachnolord
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Ted, all check. =)

They're currently eating tulip poplar and sassafras leaves, which are changed out daily, and their poopies go into our compost bin daily.

So far I don't see as much growth in them as I was expecting, despite their voracious appetites. I'm not sure what to make of that.
 

Black Widow88

Arachnobaron
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LOL! Poopies! :D I remember keeping one that I found outside my house. My mom said keep it in your room and let me know when it's a pretty moth ( she hates caterpillars but loves what they become )! I also raised Painted Lady caterpillars too. From the first instar!

Fascinating life cycle they have. Next summer hopefully I'll get to do it again and post pics. We'll see. Good luck with them all and I hope they all turn out to be healthy beautiful moths!

Black Widow88
 

Ted

Arachnoprince
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Ted, all check. =)

They're currently eating tulip poplar and sassafras leaves, which are changed out daily, and their poopies go into our compost bin daily.

So far I don't see as much growth in them as I was expecting, despite their voracious appetites. I'm not sure what to make of that.
well sounds like you are doing great!
also i used to make sure the end of the branch was inserted into a babyjar full of water with a hole poked in the lid, big enough for the stem to go through but not enough room for the larvae to fall in.
this kept the foliage fresh much longer.
occasionaly i misted the leaves..but have to be careful not to encourage mold, or fungus.
I don't know how the Promethia are as far as appetite, but all the silkmoths i have raised were voracious eaters.
Polyphemus were the worst..but their food sources were readily available.
luns were a little tougher to feed..and seemed to get gypsy fungus disease and die easily.
the cecropia arent as feeble, but their food sources were hard to come by.
they tend to slow down eating if they get too cool, prepare to pupate, or moult.
 
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