Poecilotheria concerns....

Baphomet

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
65
Hey guys...I have a quick question about my baby (roughly .75") Poecilotheria regalis.

Yesterday it was a thriving, happy little dude, and I watched as it pounced on a week-old cricket...

But tonight, I noticed it lying on the ground, with its legs curled under it's body.

A quick check of his cage shows a temperature of 76°, and a humidity level of 75%...I checked the memory on the thermometer, and there was no fluctuations in temperature or humidity throughout the day.

I have never seen a aboreal T molt...so I don't know if this is what it is indeed doing, or if he has gone to the great "Spider-web-in-the-sky"

Any help, suggestions (or hell, even laughs) from those familiar with Poecilotheria regalis appreciated.
 

Lostkat

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 18, 2003
Messages
342
legs curled under doesn't sound too good :(

Give him a light nudge with a brush or Q tip to see if he moves at all.
 

Devildoll

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
267
I wouldn't worry yet... it sounds like it may be one of your first poecilotherias.... All of mine have a habit of relaxing all crunched up....

are it's legs actually curled up under it, or is it just scrunched up real tight?
 

MrDeranged

He Who Rules
Staff member
Joined
Jul 16, 2002
Messages
1,916
Devildoll asked the right question, are the legs just scrunched up or actually curled under the body?

If they're just scrunched up, then all is most likely fine as they often will sit in this position. Especially if something has disturbed them. It's sort of a passive defensive position to make themselves as small a target as possible.

If the legs are actually curled under the body, then I'm sorry to say, your regalis is probably deceased.

What were you keeping it in and how was the ventilation? Arboreal T's are much more prone to having problems in an enclosure with stagnant ventilation that terrestrial T's.

I have also had Poecilotheria that were eating and doing fine only to turn around and find them dead. It just sometimes happens. If yours does turn out to be deceased, then you have my condolences.

Scott
 

deifiler

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
1,099
dont forgot spiders have mass amounts of babies to compensate for the mortality rate - your spider may of just been one of the weaker ones... ive had 3 h/maculata and only one survived, both of the dead ones died within 8 hours of recieving them, so i guess that the postage hammered them... whilst the other was completely fine
 

Baphomet

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
65
Unfortunately, his legs are indeed curled under him. I actually picked him up, and turned him over in my hand, stupidly forgetting rule #1 for a spider in the process of molting: Leave it alone!

I have him in a very small Kritter Keeper, so I don't think circulation was a concern (thank you for the tip regarding aboreal T's & circulation however...I wasn't aware of this).

I have also had Poecilotheria that were eating and doing fine only to turn around and find them dead. It just sometimes happens. If yours does turn out to be deceased, then you have my condolences.
Care to be a pall-bearer at the funeral? :(

Thanks for the info guys...I will give the little fella another day before I pronounce death.
 

Mojo Jojo

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
2,118
Sorry about the loss. On the brighter side, aren't you glad it wan't a miranda?

Jon
 
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