Please Help Identify this T

MrT

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Another picture.
Compare to image # 3-0041 @ R. Wests site: P. vespertinus ?
 

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Bjorgly

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More Pics

Hi all, i have yet more pics for you all to help me with. The spider is about 5 inches and he says it is still young, and L.parahybanas grow like weeds so my guess stands at L.parahybana. I'd like your new opinions after these pics please!
 

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Bjorgly

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I also now have a short movie of the spider (plays on quicktime). If anyone would like me to e-mail it to them so they can have a look please let me know and id be glad to mail it to you.

Mark
 

Steve Nunn

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Re: Still L parahybana

Originally posted by Haploman
the unique red hairs above the abdomen and the white bands at the end of femurs are unique in L parahybana which are absent on any pampho species
The white bands you speak of are present in P. ultramarinus, P. vespertinus, P. fortis to name a few. Have a look at Rick's site at these species. And I know of many species with red setae on the abdomen, over half of the described Pamphos. Have a look at the caput on either one of Ernie's photos. Pamphobeteus, Xenesthis, T. apophysis, and a few other genera share this shimmer on the caput, but not Lasiodora.

Cheers,
Steve
 

Tangled WWWeb

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Originally posted by schlinkey
L.Parahybana

Edit: by the first pic, my guess is def. parahybana.. the last ones though.. those look like pics of a blondi to me =D :?

My sentiments exactly. In the first photo I couldn't see any reason why it wasn't L. parahybana. In the second set of photos it looks like a T. blondi. Are you sure that's the same spider?:?
As for MR. T's , I cant see L. parahybana from the photo.
 

Tangled WWWeb

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Hey MR.T...

Here's a thought... Maybe whomever you got your T from got it confused by just labeling it LP. That could possibly stand for Lasiodorides polycuspulatus. It could have been mixed in with their L. parahybanas,then moved to a larger container where the entire name (L. parahybana) was written out on it. I have pesonally never seen a sub-adult L. polycuspulatus, but from the many adults I have seen, it wouldn't be that far of a stretch from your photo.

http://www.birdspiders.com/archive/1/0133.htm

Here is a link to Rick West's photo
 
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Haploman

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site

Rick wests site shows adults not 1-4 inch slings, Lasiodorides polycuspulatus as striping down the legs like the A seemanni, T blondi slings are really silvery gray with really fuzzy legs and thats all of them, I owned many lasiodora parahybana and its definately it. the 1st - 2nd instars they were a brown then after the third molt they turned the color like on the first pic.
 

Tangled WWWeb

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Re: site

Originally posted by Haploman
Rick wests site shows adults not 1-4 inch slings, Lasiodorides polycuspulatus as striping down the legs like the A seemanni, T blondi slings are really silvery gray with really fuzzy legs and thats all of them, I owned many lasiodora parahybana and its definately it. the 1st - 2nd instars they were a brown then after the third molt they turned the color like on the first pic.
I agree that the 1st spider in this thread looks like L. parahybana. The one that I was referring to as possibly L. polycuspulatus was the one in MR. T's photo. In the photo it appears to have leg stiping.
 

Bjorgly

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SORRY!

Hi all, i am afiraid i have the answer to why you are baffled by the second pictures versus the first one. It IS a different spider that the first one (we still need to identify it though, but is is not a L.parahybana, the first one is). My friend accidently sent me the wrong pics. Anyways, the last 3 pics i posted are of a different spider that i dont even have a guess to what they are so any help, once again, is appreciated :D :D :D

Thanks so much everyone!

Mark
 

Haploman

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ahhhhh

Bjorgly take the sun out of the pic cant see it to well, take an overhead shot with all legs on floor (dont let it rear up) we need a clearer image with that bright sun in the way it could be anything
 

Bjorgly

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It is not my picture...someone e-mailed me and asked for my help...i have a movie of it i can e-mail you if you want.

Mark
 

Steve Nunn

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Re: Hey MR.T...

Hi,
Lasiodorides maybe, Lasiodora, well, no. Sorry, but it's not Lasiodora. I have never seen a Lasiodora with the shimmer on the caput. Again, only certain genera have this trait, not Lasiodora. The visible integument on the patella is present in L. polycuspulatus, Pamphobeteus ultrmarinus and many juvenile theraphosids of the new world.

I don't believe I'll change your opinion Haploman and I respect the fact you have over a hundred T's, have you ever dabled in cladistics and systematics of the Theraphosidae? If you have then you'll understand that this is really a moot point. Due to the factors that decide different species, even genera, it's impossible to be certain what species that spider is. Same situation with the whole Infraorder Mygalomorphae. This is the reason I will state what it isn't, rather than what it is, for it's impossible without a scope and the specimen. Bottom line is this is all guesswork, regardless of how sure anyone is of what species that spider may be.

Should I be borrowing some of Stan Schultz's flame retardant now?

Cheers,
Steve


Originally posted by JP version 1.0
Here's a thought... Maybe whomever you got your T from got it confused by just labeling it LP. That could possibly stand for Lasiodorides polycuspulatus. It could have been mixed in with their L. parahybanas,then moved to a larger container where the entire name (L. parahybana) was written out on it. I have pesonally never seen a sub-adult L. polycuspulatus, but from the many adults I have seen, it wouldn't be that far of a stretch from your photo.

http://www.birdspiders.com/archive/1/0133.htm

Here is a link to Rick West's photo
 
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