p muticus

Oliverhenderson

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is a p muticus a good beginner fossorial tarantula i already own an old world and i really want another one and i love tarantulas that burrow wondering if i could get your input
 

Moakmeister

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is a p muticus a good beginner fossorial tarantula i already own an old world and i really want another one and i love tarantulas that burrow wondering if i could get your input
Apparently they're one of the easiest fossorials to care for
 

TownesVanZandt

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is a p muticus a good beginner fossorial tarantula i already own an old world and i really want another one and i love tarantulas that burrow wondering if i could get your input
No, if you really want a terrestrial "baboon", E. pachypus (they make really interesting burrows), C.darlingi or marshalli or even a Pterinochilus species other than P. murinus are much better choices

Apparently they're one of the easiest fossorials to care for
In terms of husbandry, most terrestrial "baboons" are incredibly easy to care for.
 

Rittdk01

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I got 3 h gigas t's 4 or 5 months ago. These were tiny when I got them and all have molted a few times and grown a lot. They grow at the exact speed as my obt. These are very similar to king baboons. The main differences are growth rates (muticus are extremely slow growing), humidity requirements (h gigas kept moist) and cost (h gigas are much cheaper). Make sure you really want a burrowing tarantula. Out of a dozen different t's I own, the h gigas are my least favorite. They are literally containers of dirt and I can see them a bit in their borrows with a flashlight.
 

cold blood

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I got 3 h gigas t's 4 or 5 months ago. These were tiny when I got them and all have molted a few times and grown a lot. They grow at the exact speed as my obt. These are very similar to king baboons. The main differences are growth rates (muticus are extremely slow growing), humidity requirements (h gigas kept moist) and cost (h gigas are much cheaper). Make sure you really want a burrowing tarantula. Out of a dozen different t's I own, the h gigas are my least favorite. They are literally containers of dirt and I can see them a bit in their borrows with a flashlight.
Yeah but they're total beasts....for such a large t, they're incredibly fast, and the tunnels and the speed at which they construct them is amazing. H. gigas was, for me, a t I never searched out, and have one just because it fell in my lap...I wish I had several...for me its become one of my most favorite fossorials...although I agree, next to me I. mira, this t is my least visible burrower.

To each their own....the beauty of this great hobby.
 

Venom1080

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depends if you want a spider you can see. ive seen my muticus out of its burrow twice in 3 years. go for I mira, or Hysteocrates if you want a burrower you can see sometimes.
 

cold blood

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depends if you want a spider you can see. ive seen my muticus out of its burrow twice in 3 years. go for I mira, or Hysteocrates if you want a burrower you can see sometimes.
If that's your basis for choosing, a fossorial is probably the wrong choice altogether.

People buying fossorials aren't buying them for "display"....if they are, they're mis-guided in their motivations.
 

Venom1080

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If that's your basis for choosing, a fossorial is probably the wrong choice altogether.

People buying fossorials aren't buying them for "display"....if they are, they're mis-guided in their motivations.
all my arachnids are for display. why do people buy C lividus if not for their colors?? dont know why youd buy a tarantula in the first place, you cant play with them so displaying them like fish is the only option.
P muticus arent good display spiders, but i still like OBs. i like seeing what they do with their burrows.
 

cold blood

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all my arachnids are for display. why do people buy C lividus if not for their colors??
Oh that's an easy one...because they're mis-guided and don't know any better....we see it pretty much constantly.

Its all about how it looks, often the thought of how often it will be seen is completely over-looked.
 

KezyGLA

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I would avoid Pterinochilus. P. mut isn't a bad choice , but a painfully slow grower.

Ceratogyrus and Harpactira are great baboons and are usually less highly stung.. But are you looking for something more feisty?

What size is your marshalli?
 

Oliverhenderson

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I would avoid Pterinochilus. P. mut isn't a bad choice , but a painfully slow grower.

Ceratogyrus and Harpactira are great baboons and are usually less highly stung.. But are you looking for something more feisty?

What size is your marshalli?
5 in
 

Pmuticus704

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I personally love P. muticus (if you couldn't tell from my handle) and highly recommend them as a first baboon but you need to do your research and be ready to deal with a defensive spider... Males are very hard to come bye unless you get slings and rear them out. The females are amazing and by far are my favorite baboon for ease of care.
 

TownesVanZandt

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I would avoid Pterinochilus. P. mut isn't a bad choice , but a painfully slow grower.
Hmm, may I ask why? I agree when it comes to P. murinus, they are IME more prone to bolting than most African Ts. They are also readily available and a lot of people tend to house them as semi-arboreals which is not a good idea. When it comes to the other species of the genus, however, I can´t really see that a P. lugardi or a P. chordatus for example should be more challenging to keep than a P. muticus ?
 

KezyGLA

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Hmm, may I ask why? I agree when it comes to P. murinus, they are IME more prone to bolting than most African Ts. They are also readily available and a lot of people tend to house them as semi-arboreals which is not a good idea. When it comes to the other species of the genus, however, I can´t really see that a P. lugardi or a P. chordatus for example should be more challenging to keep than a P. muticus ?
Yep all localities of murinus are prone to bolting but there is a couple that will stand and fight regularly though. Again with localities there has been a couple of localities seen in the wild living like semi-arboreal ie. murinus Tete and Kenya.

I am not saying to stay away from the genus but almost every dodgy situations I have had when it comes to Africans has been with some Pterinochilus lugardi and chordatus I have been keeping.

The murinus usual suspect when it comes to bad attitude as it is much more common, though the other species in the genus certainly shouldnt be looked at any differently aha
 

Chris LXXIX

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It's funny however that in general C.marshalli (for instance) are always viewed more "calmer", when it comes to a defensive attitude, than a P.murinus when the truth is that Ceratogyrus is a genus full of pretty defensive Theraphosidae, by far more than the genus Pterinochilus ones (the "infamous" OBT aside) if compared.

This because 'OBT' got wrapped into a sort of 'black legend' during years that leaded and leads a lot of keepers to view those as eight legged brute monsters always ready to "threat pose & bite", and, on the other hand, genus Ceratogyrus on that sense was "lowered" and a bit underestimated. Too bad that those last loves to hiss, strike, and bolt just like the 'OBT' but nope, the 'OBT' is worst :kiss:
 
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