P. metallica

chaset

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 9, 2002
Messages
120
Lets hope there are lots of Spiderlings of these,

I noticed one US site has P. Miranda's for sale now =)
 

Dean W

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 30, 2002
Messages
74
nice!

Does it come in any other colors? or just shades of blue?
 

Vayu Son

Avatar of Anansi
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
809
><

Todd gearhart at tarantulaspiders.com and a few other dealers have them. but expect the prices to be alot of $$$$ and youll probably find its a tarantula like all the others you have, no more and no less. so why pay $200+ unless your buyin in bulk and doing a serious breeding effort.

-V
 

invertepet

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
608
Originally posted by monantony
V
I agree, and even if you want to breed, what good is it if they are all siblings? Anyway, I wasnt sure if they had landed and they arent that spectacular to me <miranda>
Tony
I inbred two sibling P. fasciatas back in 1991 (there weren't too many in this country back then) and the offspring were excellent. Hardy and bright colored. I suspect the doomsaying about sibling inbreeding in invertebrates is a little overblown - the genetic traits aren't quite the same as with mammals, and there's evidence that inbreeding happens quite a lot in the wild, especially with arboreal spiders that may never leave a given tree.

As for Miranda, I think they're cool looking, at least from the one pic Rick W. has provided. Not just the violet iridescence, but the lack of patella band and the overall whitish hue (plus the variation of the abdominal pattern) make it one of the more 'different' looking Poecilotheria.

I'll have them and they're likely to be a fair bit under $200, FWIW. Still expensive for a spider, but if you've gotta be the first on your block... ;)

bill
 

Crotalus

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
2,434
"I inbred two sibling P. fasciatas back in 1991 (there weren't too many in this country back then) and the offspring were excellent. Hardy and bright colored. I suspect the doomsaying about sibling inbreeding in invertebrates is a little overblown - the genetic traits aren't quite the same as with mammals, and there's evidence that inbreeding happens quite a lot in the wild, especially with arboreal spiders that may never leave a given tree."

Rick West have inbred t´s and found out that some species are very sensitive to inbreeding. The clutches was small, weak spiderlings and lots and lots o deaths. Did you have any of the spiderlings left to adult size? Maybe they looked allright, but perhaps longevity was shorter then normal? Inbreeding is not good - even if it occur in nature.


"I'll have them and they're likely to be a fair bit under $200, FWIW. Still expensive for a spider, but if you've gotta be the first on your block..."

No way in h*ll i pay 200 dollar for a sling! Thats insane. :)

/Lelle
 

MrDeranged

He Who Rules
Staff member
Joined
Jul 16, 2002
Messages
1,960
Originally posted by Crotalus
[B

No way in h*ll i pay 200 dollar for a sling! Thats insane. :)

/Lelle [/B]
How much would you pay for an adult though?

It's funny, when I first started in the hobby, I would look at some of the prices of some of the rarer slings around and go "there is NO WAY that I'll spend 50.00 on some tiny little speck that might die anyway" Of course now that I've been in the hobby longer 50.00 isn't even a cap on what I'll spend anymore. 200.00 is definitely still a bit excessive.... unless it's for and Adult Scolopendra gigantea and then it would be cheap :) Of course the wife still wouldn't let me get that.... :(

Scott
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
I worked for a reptile breeder for awhile, and the average priced, newly hatched/born animal was something like $500! O.K., it was a high-end specialty sort of place, but $200 may be a huge amount for a spider, but compared to herps, it's only "moderately pricey". Spiders aren't herps, but the hobbies are remarkably simmilar. Spiderlings are a bit riskier than most herps I guess, but still I don't think $200 is completely crazy...too rich for my blood, but these days so are all tarantulas =D

One thing I've wondered about concerning the inbreeding of siblings...could the sickly young be a result of breeding females earlier than they probably should be, rather than something inherent with the genetics? Males usually mature sooner than females, perhaps in the wild those young females would skip the year and not breed until the next. How about offspring-to-mother inbreeding? Does that also create poor quality offspring? Not that I'm advocting inbreeding as a standard practice, but if it's the only option, as it was for Bill, then it may be better than letting a species dissapear from the hobby.

Wade
 
Top