Omg it's a t

Arachnopal

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
7
I have a baby Mexican Red Knee. When I got it the legspan was about that of a quarter not much more. It was pretty bald with very little color. Amazed at how fat it was getting after owning it a month I snapped a few pictures. Perfect timing about 24 hours after the photo session "Kneesie" vanished deep into the little hide I made for it. 3 days later a small T emerged. Kneesie does not look like just a spider anymore. It is about the size of a silver dollar now.
 
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Vespula

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 27, 2010
Messages
707
It's amazing how they change after a molt at that size. My little one molted not long ago, and the change was magnificent! You have a very pretty T!
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
Congratulations on the molt.... Now to the serious note.

That enclosure is WAY too big for that T(arantula). You need something smaller such as a kritter keeper or a deli cup. That enclosure is a big risk for that T, if it were to climb and fall, it could rupture the abdomen. And I can't see what substrate you are using, but wood chips are bad just in case that is what you are using. Wait until your tarantula reaches 4-5" before you put it in that tank. When it reaches that size, you will want to fill it a little over halfway up with coconut fiber.

So, move your tarantula into a deli cup or kritter keeper half full of coconut fiber and you will be good. I don't know how much you are feeding it to make it that big, but 2-4 crickets a week for it will be fine. And remember to wait at least a week before you feed it, so it can harden up. And if you provide it a water dish, no sponge.

Welcome to the hobby and to the boards. If you need more advice on how to setup your cage, I'm sure others will post, or you can search for it.

Good Luck
 

Arachnopal

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
7
Tank

Chris Thanks for the tip but the 10 gallon tank open in that pic is the home for my adult Arizona Blond. Kneesie lives in a 2.5 gallon tank. For some reason this little T likes to be held. Whenever I pick it up it likes to stay. I often do my watering and feeding with this little T on my arm. After taking care of my other T's I have to use my blush brush to coax him off me and back into his tank.
 

DrJ

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Jan 11, 2008
Messages
588
Even if it was in a 10 gallon, there is no such thing as going "too big". It's nothing more than a lie. And, Chris, why fill the 10 up with substrate? Red-knees aren't known to be hardcore burrowers. Those are the only issues I have.

Arachnopal, congrats on the T. She (let's hope it's a she) is beautiful. :)
 

Ictinike

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
460
Even if it was in a 10 gallon, there is no such thing as going "too big". It's nothing more than a lie. And, Chris, why fill the 10 up with substrate? Red-knees aren't known to be hardcore burrowers. Those are the only issues I have.

Arachnopal, congrats on the T. She (let's hope it's a she) is beautiful. :)
While I guess it's true there is no such thing as "too big" in regard to housing it but for ease of caring, cleaning and space constraints it's just easier "now" to have something smaller.

As well my B. smithi has always climbed and just the other night caught her hanging from a leg off her large screen top. While she can and has gotten down in those cases where they do somehow get up there and it's not a 1/2" or 1" drop it's 5-6" drop the possibility of damage is increased.

It's not a burrowing thing, though mine does all the time, as more a safety issue with the T if it gets into a situation where it falls.

You'll hear many, including myself, state it's better to have substrate up to just 1-1 1/2" times the length of the spider specifically for those types of fall situations. In the case of a 2.5-5g tank versus a 10g the simple fact is less substrate used within the years you have the enclosure.

Sorry Chris if I replied for you but I'm sure you share the same sentiments...
 

redrumpslump

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
336
I think Chris was saying fill it up incase it climbs and falls it doesn't get hurt. Correct me if I'm wrong Chris.

Matt

you beat me to th punch ictinike lol
 

DrJ

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Jan 11, 2008
Messages
588
Well, he's suggesting to move it up at 4-5". At this size, there is not much to be concerned about height-wise. Just my opinion, though.
 

tarantulagirl10

Arachnobaron
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
Messages
537
Nice B smithi! Just got one this past weekend; it's about 1-1/2". They are so cute and when I first got into tarantulas and pictured one in my head, the B smithi is the one I pictured.
 

Sesame Sam

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 8, 2010
Messages
65
I have a B.smithi of a similar age, i Really cannot wait to see it grow.

Mine is really giving it a go with the burrowing, maybe its going to molt so i'll just wait and see.

Check out the crazy pile of substrate its leaving outside the burrow though...


Its hard to see the definition but its quite a steep mound.....
 

Arachnopal

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
7
Tank

Only time I have ever seen any of my T's fall is when they try to climb the glass.
Before this B. Smithi molted I noticed 1 night it was climbing up the glass. it seemed to be dancing in a way. When i looked closer i saw it was laying a web in a zig zag pattern up the side of the glass. It built several of these ladders around the sides of the tank. Since the molt it has also started burrowing. Seems to be spending more time in the burrow now that it has dug 1.
I cycled about 50 arizona blondes this summer. I find them in the yard on the side of the house and along any walk I take. I cant help but pick up everyone I find. Most cases I give them a bunch of crickets and let them go with a full belly. A few younger 1's I may keep. Depends on housing at the time and how docile the new find is.
The point I want to make here is I see alot of wild T's and i never saw one make a web ladder like that little B. Smithi did before the molt. And have not seen it do it since.
 

Sesame Sam

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 8, 2010
Messages
65
Only time I have ever seen any of my T's fall is when they try to climb the glass.
Before this B. Smithi molted I noticed 1 night it was climbing up the glass. it seemed to be dancing in a way. When i looked closer i saw it was laying a web in a zig zag pattern up the side of the glass. It built several of these ladders around the sides of the tank. Since the molt it has also started burrowing. Seems to be spending more time in the burrow now that it has dug 1.
I cycled about 50 arizona blondes this summer. I find them in the yard on the side of the house and along any walk I take. I cant help but pick up everyone I find. Most cases I give them a bunch of crickets and let them go with a full belly. A few younger 1's I may keep. Depends on housing at the time and how docile the new find is.
The point I want to make here is I see alot of wild T's and i never saw one make a web ladder like that little B. Smithi did before the molt. And have not seen it do it since.
I am more than mildly jealous of your ability to find your own T's. I think I may have to move to the US, then i could find my own T's and go looking for snakes. But then again maybe the reason I find these things so interesting is that they aren't native where I am.
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
Messages
733
Well fed and other.

I have a baby Mexican Red Knee. When I got it the legspan was about that of a quarter not much more. It was pretty bald with very little color. Amazed at how fat it was getting after owning it a month I snapped a few pictures. Perfect timing about 24 hours after the photo session "Kneesie" vanished deep into the little hide I made for it. 3 days later a small T emerged. Kneesie does not look like just a spider anymore. It is about the size of a silver dollar now.
HAVE ANUTHA MEEEYUL!!.... BAYBEE! That's a nice looking t!:)

Congratulations on the molt.... Now to the serious note.

That enclosure is WAY too big for that T(arantula). You need something smaller such as a kritter keeper or a deli cup. That enclosure is a big risk for that T, if it were to climb and fall, it could rupture the abdomen. And I can't see what substrate you are using, but wood chips are bad just in case that is what you are using. Wait until your tarantula reaches 4-5" before you put it in that tank. When it reaches that size, you will want to fill it a little over halfway up with coconut fiber.

So, move your tarantula into a deli cup or kritter keeper half full of coconut fiber and you will be good. I don't know how much you are feeding it to make it that big, but 2-4 crickets a week for it will be fine. And remember to wait at least a week before you feed it, so it can harden up. And if you provide it a water dish, no sponge.

Welcome to the hobby and to the boards. If you need more advice on how to setup your cage, I'm sure others will post, or you can search for it.

Good Luck
Yes, that setup looks risky for a fall and ruptured abdomen. I don't know if you've ever seen it happen but it wouldn't be a fun thing to watch as the t fell and hit the wood, then whizzed around the tank in midair like an overfilled untied balloon. Nah, it wouldn't happen quite like that... BUT.... the t would probably die. :(

Depending on the temps in which they're kept (in addition to unknown factors- at least unknown to myself), I've found that slings up to 2" or so harden much quicker- often more than ready to accept a meal after 3 days or so- sooner than that with some smaller indivs.

Even if it was in a 10 gallon, there is no such thing as going "too big". It's nothing more than a lie. And, Chris, why fill the 10 up with substrate? Red-knees aren't known to be hardcore burrowers. Those are the only issues I have.

Arachnopal, congrats on the T. She (let's hope it's a she) is beautiful. :)
I disagree with the first two sentences. Although many of my past sling enclosures would be considered way too large by most keepers' standards, I find that overall, slings do better in smaller ones. This is not only due to ease of maintenance but mainly for the sling's sense of security. I find they feed, molt, and behave closer to normal in smaller enclosures.... until they reach at least ~3" or so.

Well, he's suggesting to move it up at 4-5". At this size, there is not much to be concerned about height-wise. Just my opinion, though.
Again, "BONK!! Pffftttwheeooeeeooooooo......" - better decrease the distance between the top of the tank and that wood! This is just one of a few reasons that "low-profile" sterilite-type containers, although not as aestheticly appealing to us, work better for t's than most glass aquariums. ;)
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
590
I have a B.smithi of a similar age, i Really cannot wait to see it grow.

Mine is really giving it a go with the burrowing, maybe its going to molt so i'll just wait and see.

Check out the crazy pile of substrate its leaving outside the burrow though...
Its hard to see the definition but its quite a steep mound.....
Im not sure what kind of substrate your using but it looks like potting soil and bark. The bark you have in there could be any number of wood byproducts that contain natural insect repelents that trees produce. Not to mention the potting soil may have added fertilizer in there. Try finding some peat moss at your local hardware/garden store. Its cheaper and safe as long as it is organic.

To the OP: I recommend keeping your tarantula close to the ground when handling it. If it gets startled by something it can fall. A simple breath or loud sound can startle a calm spider. It would be a shame if that little guy fell from your hand and died. Sure this may never happen but its just not worth the risk. Since your B. smithi is climbing: Make sure the soil is dry. They donot like it damp. Filling it up 3-4" from the top of the cage with substrate should be fine. Make sure there are not sharp objects lining the wall of the enclosure it may injure its self on. B. smithi are terrible climbers.

Tarantulas do not enjoy being held. I have never heard of a case in the wild when a spider invites an intruder in.. These are wild animals and have instincts. They cannot be "tamed" the same way mammals can.


Best of luck with your smithi, They are wonderful pets and great eaters! :D

Doug
 

Arachnopal

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
7
I use Ace Hardware potting soil. It has some perlite mixed with it but no ferilizers. The bark is from an old black mesquite tree that has fallen on my property. Large chunks peel off and after a trip to the microwave I think they work great.
I am convinced I do have to many dangers in this that tank for any T. As much as I like the pieces of raw tourqoise and quartz crystals I have put in from around the area I realize this tank was set up for me and not my T. This may be a habit from my old fish tank days that I will have to work on. I will be removing most of the "decorations" today. I will also increase the depth of my substrate. But that will have to wait until the burrow queen emerges and I can move her during that.

Mumbles to himself. They only need a hide. They only need a hide. They only need a hide
 
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