Normal?

FuzzyManSloth

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
4
So I may just be a little paranoid, but today I was just having a quick once over of my Brachypelma Albopilosum to make sure everything's okay and noticed the book lungs are completely bald. Looking at other pictures I don't see the same thing... is this one of those things that happen or is there something else I should be worrying about? Thanks in advance
 

Attachments

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
Brachypelma Albopilosum
Indeed normal, maybe paranoid, I can't diagnose that. Nice to see a new person using the scientific name, by the way, species name is always lower case, only genus is capitalized. Of course if one was strict, they would put both in italics, few people do that around here. I sure don't.
 

FuzzyManSloth

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
4
Indeed normal, maybe paranoid, I can't diagnose that. Nice to see a new person using the scientific name, by the way, species name is always lower case, only genus is capitalized. Of course if one was strict, they would put both in italics, few people do that around here. I sure don't.
Yeah, I prefer to use the scientific names just to get myself used to them, I find some common names aren't completely distinct to just one species of T, so just makes things seem a bit less complicated haha:happy: Thanks for the reassurance!
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
Yeah, I prefer to use the scientific names just to get myself used to them, I find some common names aren't completely distinct to just one species of T, so just makes things seem a bit less complicated haha:happy: Thanks for the reassurance!
I used to know B. smithi by it's common name, now I don't. In fact, when I hear Mexican Red-Legged or Mexican Red-Knee, I don't know which one that is anymore, as to me both names fit about 3 species.

Though, smithi's name is about to be changed after a revision, not sure if the paper is published yet, any month though it will be out. It's already been accepted.
 

FuzzyManSloth

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
4
I'm the same at the moment as in paranoid with my new 1cm sling which I got Tuesday , it's only natural .
I used to know B. smithi by it's common name, now I don't. In fact, when I hear Mexican Red-Legged or Mexican Red-Knee, I don't know which one that is anymore, as to me both names fit about 3 species.

Though, smithi's name is about to be changed after a revision, not sure if the paper is published yet, any month though it will be out. It's already been accepted.
There seems to be multiple common names for one species as well and that's never really made much sense to me, just seems so much easier to know one name per species so there's no confusion.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
There seems to be multiple common names for one species as well and that's never really made much sense to me, just seems so much easier to know one name per species so there's no confusion.
I understand why common names develop, in short it's easier communicate. However you run into the problems "what is it"

And then because the USA gets a lot of Ts from Europe, they have their common names too.

For example. A. sp. amazonica and A sp. amazonica "Manaus", are in fact the same tarantula, fortunately that T now has its own species and is no longer a subspecies.

But if a T is not characterized at all, such as E. sp. Red, well the common names just mushroom.
 

D Sherlod

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
Messages
222
Writing proper names is easy..... learning to say them is a whole other ball game....
 

Deb60

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jan 7, 2017
Messages
125
Oh I don't know , I have to check the spellings each time I write about any of my Ts , luckily I've written both Latin and common names on their set ups on a label
 

DPetsche

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
46
I've gotten really used to typing out Poecilotheria and that was always one of the harder ones for me. Then theres cyaneopubescens. Haha, I had to check google to make sure I spelled that right. Rather than the spelling, I just tend to forget the names. I'm constantly forgetting that I have a "Hapolopus sp. Colombia!
 

ledzeppelin

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
434
Indeed normal, maybe paranoid, I can't diagnose that. Nice to see a new person using the scientific name, by the way, species name is always lower case, only genus is capitalized. Of course if one was strict, they would put both in italics, few people do that around here. I sure don't.
@Chris LXXIX is the latin nazi around here :p PBUH ( peace be upon him) ;)
 

darkness975

dream reaper
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
3,906
Of course if one was strict, they would put both in italics, few people do that around here. I sure don't.
I am one of the few that uses italics when writing the scientific names. Call me OCD I suppose but I prefer it to be 100% correct.
I am also not a fan of the whole B. smithi name changing thing - makes the whole idea of using scientific names to identify species in place of common names to be almost moot.

Anyway, @FuzzyManSloth, to answer your inquiry, as others have said, it looks fine to me.
 
Top