new to centipedes

dazbuzz

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i have been thinking about getting a centipede for some time now and i was wondering what a good starter pede is? i would like a fairly easygoing pede thats easy to maintain. also i live in the u.k so i can only get some of the species.
 

edesign

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basically anything in the Scolopendra genus can be considered to have a very very painful bite, there are some exceptions (ask Caco :) ). S. polymorpha would be a good starter pede imo because they aren't huge (could be a negative if it escapes lol) but they do get decently long, don't have a severe bite (relative of course), and can be easily managed. They are fast so don't let their size fool you, just don't get mesmerized by all the yellow legs everywhere ;)

Ethmostigmus trigonopodus is another species with relatively weak venom from what I've read (which also includes Caco's twisted experiments lol). I have one of these as well, maybe 7"ish tip to tip (standard is body length minus antennae and terminal legs) and if my lazy self can keep one alive for a year and a half with only one major screw up (don't let them dry out!) then anyone can. Their girth is maybe as big around as my pinky finger so it makes them more impressive to see than the polymorphas size-wise. Also mine is a pretty good eater, but best to watch them with a red light at night with the lights out...or at least dim regular lights.

But generally...Scolopendras are known for their bites with a few exceptions. However, if properly setup and cared for properly with the care and respect they deserve even a S. subspinipes can be kept by a beginner...as long as everyone who will be around it is well aware of the potent venom. Not that I think most people who sees an 8-9"+ centipede running across the floor are going to stick around long enough to be bitten... {D

edit: S. morsitans wouldn't be a bad choice either from the Scolopendra genus...try doing a search with the forum's search engine to see about care for this species. They are very nice looking :)
 

Teeroy

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I just got into the centipedes a few months ago and I am addicted!!! I started with two that I think you would be very pleased with. They both are great eaters and easy to care for so far!

Ethmostigmus trigonopodus- Tanzanian blueringleg hides alot but will entertain you when it's feeding time

Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans-Chinese red headed centipede is out alot more than the blue ring, still hides majority of time. He comes out when he is hungry and doesn't retreat to his hide with his prey.

Good Luck
 

dazbuzz

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so S. morsitans is the same as a neon blue leg centipede? on the site i put on in my first post they are 2 different pedes.
 

edesign

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i believe that is the common name for S. morsitans...so yeah, one and the same.

Centipede species identification is tricky at best...Steven is the resident expert on ID'ing centipedes, I would ask him for verification but general pictures rarely help. Pictures of the location of the spiracles, close up of terminal leg spines, close up of antennae segments from base to tip, etc...those are helpful but hard to get from a dealer I would expect, maybe not.
 

cacoseraph

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typically neon-blue leg is associated with S. mirabilis... but there are a number of species that have adults that could conceivably be called NBL including S. polymorpha and Ethmostigmus trigonopodus and conceivably even S. morsitans

here is a baby S. morsitans "Egyptian Emerald" that almost fits the bill :)

zoom

...but i have never seen such a dramatic teal/aquamarine leg coloration in an adult.
 

cacoseraph

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Venom also varies by individual and geography. The S. mirabilis from Tanzania, "Neon Blue" has a very unimpressive bite (1/2hr of slight tingling) but many hobbyists have trouble keeping that species alive.
that's a good point about venom.

also, i have read that some ppl think it is possible that venom potency varies seasonally too.

also, prey selectin could conceivably affect venom potency in a number of ways.

that's also a good point about mirabilis... they do seem to be rather diey at times
 

dazbuzz

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ok centipedes seem much more complex than scorpions:? :? so i shouldn't get a neon blue? i should get a blue legged centipede?. sorry about being so nooby but i wanna make sure i get this right.
 

edesign

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if you want something that is big and doesn't have a horrible bite...try the E. trigonopodus. If i'm not mistaken they're from a slightly drier environment so humidity might not be QUITE as important...but in NO way am I saying you should let the humidity fall very far. As long as the substrate is moist (but not soaking wet) it will be fine...I mist mine every 2-3 days if the substrate is moist. Or, if I've been running the heater in the house a lot I know it dries up the air I will mist daily. A water bowl that is overflowed every couple of days is also a good bet...will help the pede decide how much moisture it wants to burrow in.

Caco...those legs are gorgeous! They fade as they get older I presume from what you posted?
 

dazbuzz

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E. trigonopodus sounds like a good begginer pede so i will see if i can find one.
 

dazbuzz

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ok i've narrowed my chocies down to: E. trigonopodus(but i can't find a site that sells), blue legged centipede or a chinese red headed centipede.
 

Scorp guy

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ok i've narrowed my chocies down to: E. trigonopodus(but i can't find a site that sells), blue legged centipede or a chinese red headed centipede.
Hi,

Both of those mentioned are great for beginners. i prefer the Chinese red head (Scolopendra mutilans) because of it's size, and not-so-horrible temperment. along with the fact that they've Known to be communal. Good luckw ith your chocie.
 

KyuZo

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go with the chinese red head (Scolopendra s. mutilan). they are more active.
jason
 

mindlessvw

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good luck to ya man theya re way addictive...be careful though...i thought after keeping hot snakes what could some little bug do and i ended up smacking my head on the counter when i jumped back from that thing!!! they are a different level!!! good luck to ya...and if you get bitten TAKE PICTURES!!!
 

Cheshire

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I've always been a fan of S. heros as a starter centi but those may be a bit hard to find in europe.
 

dazbuzz

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ok i've decided on a chinese red head. how aggresive are these? and is the care the same as most other pedes? eg. 75-85f, 75-85% humidity. eco-earth substrate and water dish ect.
 
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