New guy with alot of questions

x64goo

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 16, 2016
Messages
3
Yo, what's up!
My name is x64goo and I'm an arachnophobe.

I want to get a T so I can hopefully overcome my 8-legged fear.
Is this wise? Not wise?

If yes,
I would enjoy tips on a first T.
I read up on G. Rosea and might end up with it.
Terrariums, I have no clue.

General tips + tricks as well, or advice!
Cheers.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
Thrixopelma cyaneolum, Euathlus sp. red, Grammostola sp. north, Grammostola pulchripes, Euathlus sp. yellow, Phrixotrichus scrofa

That is my suggestions. Research posts on them by using the search bar on these forums and read about them before purchasing. Once you know what you would like to pick as first T, then you research the husbandry.

I personally would avoid rose hair. They are bipolar.
 

Graves6661

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 31, 2015
Messages
86
For an enclosure dont waste your money on a terrarium. a normal kritter keeper set up with the proper substrate and amount of substrate will work perfectly.

Research the species here on the forum before making any purchases. Common care sheets found online tend to be generic and cause more harm than good in some cases.

As mentioned above, the rose hairs can be temperamental and like to fast for long periods of time which causes unneeded worry for new keepers. @EulersK has a great video on youtube about beginner species you can look into.
 

x64goo

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 16, 2016
Messages
3
Thanks for the replies, but is being an Arachnophobe going to be an issue in handling a T? I am deathly afraid and very worried about them biting me or getting lost and hunting dogs/attacking other members of household.

Thanks.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Thanks for the replies, but is being an Arachnophobe going to be an issue in handling a T? I am deathly afraid and very worried about them biting me or getting lost and hunting dogs/attacking other members of household.

Thanks.
You'll find that very, very few of us handle our tarantulas. It is unsafe to both you and the spider, so there is really just no need. And for the record, I got into this hobby just because I had arachnophobia as well :D Although, if you are "deathly afraid", you may want to find another hobby. If that is a bit of an exaggeration, though, then go ahead.
 

x64goo

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 16, 2016
Messages
3
You'll find that very, very few of us handle our tarantulas. It is unsafe to both you and the spider, so there is really just no need. And for the record, I got into this hobby just because I had arachnophobia as well :D Although, if you are "deathly afraid", you may want to find another hobby. If that is a bit of an exaggeration, though, then go ahead.
Rad, appreciate the response.
 

bryverine

Arachnoangel
Joined
Apr 18, 2012
Messages
894
Thanks for the replies, but is being an Arachnophobe going to be an issue in handling a T?
Gosh, I hope so. Tarantulas are surprisingly fragile and can rupture abdomens from relatively short distances.

I am deathly afraid and very worried about them biting me or getting lost and hunting dogs/attacking other members of household.
Thanks.
As long as you stay away from any old world (and a few new world tarantulas) for now, they act quite similar. Very few like to stand their ground and would rather retreat. With proper care, escapes are rare. I've never had one in 4 years (knock on wood).

My wife hated spiders when I started and now she knows most of them by name. Definately doesn't like them, but she is much more relaxed about them.

On that note, give it a name, make it part of the family. They're far less scary when you anthropomorphize them. :)
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
I was a super arachnophobe and yes handling an easy-going sp. helped me conquer my fear. I did it once in a blue moon. When I was comfortable with keeping as a display pet I stopped handling.

For the risk of repeating myself I am gonna bow out now aha.

I wish you luck man. :)
 
Last edited:

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
I want to get a T so I can hopefully overcome my 8-legged fear.
How will owning a T do this for you?

Thanks for the replies, but is being an Arachnophobe going to be an issue in handling a T? I am deathly afraid and very worried about them biting me or getting lost and hunting dogs/attacking other members of household.
It likely will be an issue for your T, not for you. Given your a "phobe" and "deathly afraid", I don't expect your nerves to be solid. Thus I wouldn't be surprised if you end up killing your T by whipping it across the room should it be the least disturbed by you as it goes splat against the wall or floor.

Handling Ts is a recipe to kill or injure them. If you want to handle a small pet, get a hamster or a lizard etc.
 

mack1855

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Sep 5, 2016
Messages
575
I would suggest you buy a copy of "The Taranula Keepers Guide",by Stanley and Marguerite Schultz.
It is a bit dated,but by and large ,an excellent book to start.A good read cover to cover.
And spend time time here on AB.Great people who have a passion for these animals.
Ive learned so much here,and while I never had a phobia,i was always more of a herp(reptile) and
aquatic person.I started with one T four months ago,now have twenty.
 

Paiige

Arachnobaron
Joined
Oct 2, 2016
Messages
331
Thanks for the replies, but is being an Arachnophobe going to be an issue in handling a T? I am deathly afraid and very worried about them biting me or getting lost and hunting dogs/attacking other members of household.
Thanks.
I would be more concerned for the tarantula! :p If you're going to handle, do so in an open space and very close to a flat surface (bed, floor, bathtub, etc) so that if the T spooks you, you can gently put it down quickly and don't panic - basically what you should be aware of are your reflexes. If the T moves the wrong way, or maybe does try to bite (however unlikely), you need to know that you're not going to accidentally fling it against a wall or across the room, because that will most likely end up killing your T.

I would go with a Grammastola species personally, but that's because a G porteri was my first and she's been an absolute sweetheart since day one. Some people tell stories of crazy rosies - something to keep in mind is that temperaments vary from animal to animal, even within a specific species. Same thing goes with cats - you can get a sweet cat that sleeps all the time or you can get a nutcase that runs in circles for hours and bites your toes. Stay away from anything Old World, just due to their speed, venom and temperaments. You want slow and docile :)

There are many threads here that can tell you the temperaments of different Ts and also probably many "first tarantula" threads - search to your heart's content and enjoy! (or at least try to until you're not scared of them anymore :p)
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
Thanks for the replies, but is being an Arachnophobe going to be an issue in handling a T? I am deathly afraid and very worried about them biting me or getting lost and hunting dogs/attacking other members of household.

Thanks.
As much as you might be phobic, a T is generally far more scared of you than you are scared of it. Some of what you need to determine is how phobic you might be. You should never plan to handle a T, but you must learn to be comfortable when one does crawl on you and it will happen sooner or later. In reality it is no different than any other bug crawling on you.

Have you ever been stung by a bee? Can you tolerate that type of pain without freaking out if it does occur? The safe species are not likely to bite you, but you must always be prepared to accept it if it happens. If a T suddenly climbs on you, can you remain calm and guide the T back into its enclosure or a safe zone like a plastic tub or similar? You must be able to say that you can protect the T first always.

If a T escapes it will be hard to find it unless you put up safeguards to limit its travel. Many people feed their T's in a bathroom floor with a towel covering the opening under the door. An escaped T will act no different than a T living in a container. It will still try to locate a place to set up home and look for bugs to eat.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
If you need help with setups and such ask us in a thread here so you get a large and diverse amount of responses, don't limit yourself to PMing someone.

We will give you constructive criticism, don't take anything personally.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
No need to buy any enclosure. It is always, always cheaper to make your own. It is wildly easy. I'm far from a handyman, and even I can manage:

If you need more tips than what is presented on there, feel free to ask.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
No need to buy any enclosure. It is always, always cheaper to make your own. It is wildly easy. I'm far from a handyman, and even I can manage:

If you need more tips than what is presented on there, feel free to ask.

Great video for basic T containers, I use the same containers myself for larger Ts. I don't put slings in such containers as that's a recipe for an escape. Glad you put that vid back up for the new person =)
 
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