New additions coming tomorrow (P. platy, Hapalopus sp. large, P. pulcher, & G. pulchripes)!

Jake J

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Sep 12, 2016
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Very excited about the incoming little fellers.* Will certainly post pics when they arrive, and am looking to get a discussion started on husbandry recommendations for any or all of the spp. noted in the title. My current understanding is that P. pulcher is the only semi-arboreal of the four, and I think the others would be content with the arid/terrestrial setup. Any advice would be appreciated!

(*in a "Sling Blade" voice)
 

Moonohol

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Don't keep the Hapalopus arid, they do better with a bit of moisture. I keep half of the sub moist by wetting it down every week or whenever the sub looks like it's started to dry out. I'd also give it a bit more sub than usual as they like to burrow and can make some pretty cool and convoluted tunnels.
 

Jake J

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Sep 12, 2016
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Don't keep the Hapalopus arid, they do better with a bit of moisture. I keep half of the sub moist by wetting it down every week or whenever the sub looks like it's started to dry out. I'd also give it a bit more sub than usual as they like to burrow and can make some pretty cool and convoluted tunnels.
They sound pretty similar in temperament to the GBB, no? Thanks for the advice and I'll be sure to follow it!
 

Moonohol

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They sound pretty similar in temperament to the GBB, no? Thanks for the advice and I'll be sure to follow it!
I don't have any experience with GBBs, but I can say that Haps are definitely very skittish and nervous in general. Mine is a total scaredy-cat that will dart deep in to its tunnels upon the tiniest disturbance, but I've heard they're not afraid to bolt at all. Just be mindful when working with it and you should be fine.
 

Jake J

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I don't have any experience with GBBs, but I can say that Haps are definitely very skittish and nervous in general. Mine is a total scaredy-cat that will dart deep in to its tunnels upon the tiniest disturbance, but I've heard they're not afraid to bolt at all. Just be mindful when working with it and you should be fine.
I got a GBB sling a few weeks ago, and it is a bit skittish but so far hasn't been flighty or defensive. Well, aside from a cute little bout of rapidly flicking hairs off its tiny bumble-bee butt during rehousing once we got its new enclosure set up, which it has since taken to very nicely.

This is in stark contrast to my P. muticus sling--moving it from its shipping container to its temporary deli cup home made it clear how quickly this guy goes from 0-60. I'll be moving it again soon to its long-term sling home, which I'd be lying if I said I was looking forward to. With GBB, giving it little nudges, while provoking some hair-flicking at first, was still a smooth and predictable enough task, but muticus appears to be the type that will remain motionless until you nudge it a few times, then takes off like a Tesla when you least expect it. So...wish me luck on that one.
 

Andrea82

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I got a GBB sling a few weeks ago, and it is a bit skittish but so far hasn't been flighty or defensive. Well, aside from a cute little bout of rapidly flicking hairs off its tiny bumble-bee butt during rehousing once we got its new enclosure set up, which it has since taken to very nicely.

This is in stark contrast to my P. muticus sling--moving it from its shipping container to its temporary deli cup home made it clear how quickly this guy goes from 0-60. I'll be moving it again soon to its long-term sling home, which I'd be lying if I said I was looking forward to. With GBB, giving it little nudges, while provoking some hair-flicking at first, was still a smooth and predictable enough task, but muticus appears to be the type that will remain motionless until you nudge it a few times, then takes off like a Tesla when you least expect it. So...wish me luck on that one.
Be prepared for that kind of stunts with your P.pulcher as well. ;)
 

viper69

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I've raised both GBBs and the Pumpkins. Behavior is very much the same, only difference is the H. sp Columbia is a much more ferocious eater (hard to believe I know). Even when they are 1/8" or less they will take on anything even if it's larger than them. Adult colors AND adult behavior in a tiny powerhouse. Trust me, they do NOT disappoint.
 

14pokies

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I've raised both GBBs and the Pumpkins. Behavior is very much the same, only difference is the H. sp Columbia is a much more ferocious eater (hard to believe I know). Even when they are 1/8" or less they will take on anything even if it's larger than them. Adult colors AND adult behavior in a tiny powerhouse. Trust me, they do NOT disappoint.
I have three that are maybe 1/4 in.. Untill yesterday I have been feeding cricket pieces wich all enjoyed..

I came across quarter inch crix the other day and two of the Hapalopus sp. ran for there life! The other one kicked the crap out of the cicket.. I mean its enclosure had pieces of cricket scattered about so much you would think it exploded!

I left the live crix in with the other two for about 20 mins and ended up just crushing the heads.. They were scavenging them within a few minutes..

Just goes to show how each T can be unique in some ways.. Lol
 

antinous

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If you keep the Pampho arid, you're going to end up with a dead T pretty quick. They need the sub to be moist, they come from a tropical environment. Always have a filled waterbowl and keep the sub moist. If you search Pampho care at all you'll see that 'moist substrate' is of utmost importance.
 

Ghost Dragon

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You'll really like the pulchripes, as it is going to get very big very quickly. Mine went from ¾" to 3¾" in just over a year. She's about the 5½" mark now. :wideyed:
 

Jake J

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You'll really like the pulchripes, as it is going to get very big very quickly. Mine went from ¾" to 3¾" in just over a year. She's about the 5½" mark now. :wideyed:
Interesting, I just read earlier a comment on another thread that pulchripes took a long time to grow. I like your assertion better ;)
 

viper69

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Interesting, I just read earlier a comment on another thread that pulchripes took a long time to grow. I like your assertion better ;)
Mine is a slow grower no question. Ten years and still not full size. I may have a runt, she's docile, but not like any other I've seen unfortunately. She has skinny legs for some reason.
 

Jake J

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Mine is a slow grower no question. Ten years and still not full size. I may have a runt, she's docile, but not like any other I've seen unfortunately. She has skinny legs for some reason.
How 'bout ol' Pumpkin Patch? Do they grow fast?
 

viper69

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I have three that are maybe 1/4 in.. Untill yesterday I have been feeding cricket pieces wich all enjoyed..

I came across quarter inch crix the other day and two of the Hapalopus sp. ran for there life! The other one kicked the crap out of the cicket.. I mean its enclosure had pieces of cricket scattered about so much you would think it exploded!

I left the live crix in with the other two for about 20 mins and ended up just crushing the heads.. They were scavenging them within a few minutes..

Just goes to show how each T can be unique in some ways.. Lol
For sure individuals. Never had one run ever, wow. This little 1/8" one I have always takes these huge crickets relative to its body size. I saw some gorgeous AFs at a show recently.
 
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