Need Chilean Rose Hair Help! :)

NickxEdge

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I'm new to the hobby, and about a month ago my girlfriend bought me a Chilean Rose Hair Tarantula (sorry, don't know the scientific names like everyone else seems to on this site lol :/ ) so naturally i've got a few questions upon how to raise it, and how i've been raising it! Pictures below are what i'm keeping it in! Is that a good habitat for her? Also, i've read on a couple sites that they wont eat unless they're hungry, and every time I feed her she eats, more than a couple times a week! Is that normal or is she just starved haha! Also, she sometimes after she eats she'll sit in her water dish and drinks most of the water! it's incredible, is that normal? haha other than that she seems happy. Do I need a heater of any sort? Please get back to me, I really enjoy my spider and hope to collect more, but only if i'm suitable to the hobby!
-Nick
 

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edesign

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Welcome to Arachnoboards :)

First let me start off by giving you a quick tip that, if you decide to stay, will serve you well for many years and get you quicker answers...there is a search engine available for this forum, know it, love it, and it will be your best friend! I'll answer your questions rather quickly here but figured I'd suggest the search engine nicely before someone else does it rudely lol. Rose hairs are very popular and just about any and every question most people can come up with has already been asked and probably answered...and again, the search engine will get you answers much faster than waiting on replies :D It is also good for coming up with questions unique to your setup/situation.

Anyway from what I can see your setup looks fine. The only issue I have with it is that there is a lot of unused vertical space...highly unlikely but if your spider climbs up the sides and falls far enough there is potential for it to rupture its abdomen. I have never had that problem but figure I should at least mention it. Don't stress over it though, my 7" Lasiodora parahybana (Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater) has about as much unused vertical space and she climbs all the time...never had an issue.

As for the latin names...you'll learn them eventually. First you'll learn the name of the one you have, then the more popular ones, and next thing you know you'll forget about even using common names!

You can feed it as much as it will eat, the only real danger is that the abdomen will become very swollen and easier to rupture but that would take a lot of crickets. On the flip side some Rose Hairs have been known to fast for over a year...so let it eat while it wants I say!

Sitting in/over a water dish is somewhat normal...it's probably also grooming itself and cleaning food off of it's fangs and other mouth parts. They do drink water too although as a desert species I wouldn't expect it to drink a lot.

As long as your temps don't stray too far from it's normal habitat's temperature range you don't need a heater.If you do decide to get one put it on the side of the tank and not underneath it. Reason for this is that in the wild T's and other critters burrow to escape from the heat and will do the same in captivity...so if they're too hot and the heating pad is under the tank they will only make matters worse by following instinct and burrowing down.

I recommend you do some quick searches on this site and via Google about basic rose hair care, they're pretty easy to take care and very hardy. I also recommend you read or buy a copy of "The Tarantula Keeper's Guidebook" by Stanley and Marguerite Schultz. I have a copy and it is invaluable...should run you about $10 or so.

Glad you are enjoying your new T...be careful, they are addictive ;)
 

edesign

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Oh...what are your temps in the day and at night? Does it have a place to hide if it so chooses?
 

Chris_Skeleton

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Your enclosure is far from fine.

First, you need a different enclosure. The risk of your tarantula falling is too great in that setup. Get a 10 gallon, put your spider in that, and save the one its in now for a climbing species. Second, do I see wood chips? These are a strict no-no. They are very abrasive and can have sharp edges and injure your tarantula. If your tarantula climbed and fell then it can be injured or even killed, plus with wood chips in there, that makes the chances even greater. You need a soft substrate such as peat or coconut fiber. Also I can't see in your water dish, but if you have a sponge, get it out, they are breeding ground for bacteria.

So in summary, rehouse your spider immediately. Put it in a 10 gallon (5.5g would be fine also or a sterilite container) about half full with peat moss or coconut fiber. Your tarantulas safety should be your first priority. The scientific name is Grammostola rosea and they are a terrestrial species. Not only is this setup hazardous to your spider, it is also a waste of space for this spider.

Feeding is very simple: 2-3 crickets once a week or spread out if you want.

Room temperature is fine for a tarantula. If you are comfortable, so are they. So unless it gets ridiculously cold at night, then you don't need a heater.

Welcome and good luck.

Glad you are here and enjoying the hobby.

P.S. And believe me, you will get more. So just save that enclosure for a future resident. :)
 

edesign

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I didn't even notice the wood chips :( Good catch Chris. While the current enclosure is technically a waste of volume and there is the danger of it falling and injuring itself I think it's a minimal risk and he shouldn't race out at dawn to replace the tank. He should definitely replace the bark chips asap though and bring it up as high as he can. If the spider wants to run out the door a few inches of plastic won't slow it down if that's why Nick didn't fill it up further ;)

The enclosure would make a great home for an arboreal T though which is often a second or third choice after one's initial T (unless they went with an Avicularia aka "Pink Toe" for the OP) and will probably be utilized rather quickly.

OP...if you've got the extra $15-20 for a 10g tank and lid go ahead and get it the next time you're in the vicinity of a pet store. If you don't have it don't freak out and worry, your spider will almost positively be fine (I'd bet my pay check on it) until you can spare it. While I don't advocate it I've never had an issue with it *shrugs* I'd be much more concerned with the wood bark swap especially if it's a fat spider.
 

Rowdy Hotel

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Lights of any kind are unnecessary for tarantulas. That kit you have to house your tarantula in usually comes with heat and UV bulbs. Don't use any of them.
 

DawgPoundSound

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Considering this particular tarantula, I'd keep it near a window if I were you. Not necessarily IN the window, but near it. Where it can get the natural day and night change. This species tends to go on long fasting periods because it hasn't adjusted in captivity and the seasonal changes. Keeping it in the dark all the time is unnatural. I have 2 adult female Rosea. They are always kept near our patio doors in the corner, but able to get the night and day change, while also not getting direct sunlight. Contrary to belief, tarantulas do move and are active during the day. While hunting and feeding is mostly done at night.

My 2 females are great. Also want to mention, it's the males that tend to go on huge fasting periods. Molting, captivity issues, or while in it's final mating period. BOTH males I've had rarely ate, and basically did nothing (unless I took them out of their enclosures), while the females are active constantly, day and night. Either webbing, rearranging the enclosure, taking a stroll, basking out in the open, or mauling anything alive dropped in their enclosure.

Not a hard tarantula to deal with at all. Very moody, and very interesting to say the least.

Have fun and enjoy!
 

Wachusaynoob

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okay in all honesty I wouldnt use an exoterra for a Gramostola Rosea. It's good if that's all you have, but I would house a decent sized Arboreal T Like a Avacularia Metallica.

House it in a 5-10 gallon Aquarium (check Craigslist!) That way you can 1. See it and 2 Get another T!
 

KoriTamashii

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Definitely change the enclosure ASAP.

Get a Kritter Keeper or something from your LPS (local pet store), fill it over halfway with coco fiber or potting soil or peat moss, and add a water dish and a place to hide.

Prepare for mood swings!

And good luck. :)
 

2oCHEVYo0

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Nice enclosure, I recommend getting it wrapped up and sent to my doorstep :D I think it should be fine really.

My suggestions:

-Cage, not even close to a big deal but since it is a terrestrial it would be better for it to have more room to roam... (very small issue, like microscopic). You can search your local craigslist for good deals (you might even see some free ones).
-Water dish, if there is a sponge remove it for reasons previously stated.
-Substrate, you definatly want to get the woodchips out asap if thats what they are. Use coco fiber and fill it up to just under the door (like .5" below the crack).
-Hide, it will need a place to hide under if it feels threatened or scared. A small half round piece of bark will suffice.
-Temps, they like what you like. If your wearing a sweater or jacket around your house, that's when you need to put on just a little heat to keep it warm. They won't usually eat unless they are warm because warmth helps them digest.
-If it stops eating, (it will) don't worry... It's most likely either fasting or it's ready to molt.
-Start researching your next T, because nobody has just one ;)
 

KevinFrancisco

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Sep 15, 2010
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Is the container beside your TV? I read somewhere that Ts should be kept away from loud noises since they are very sensitive to vibrations (that's how they hunt). So sound coming from TV, stereo and the like should be kept away from them. I badly want my Ts inside my room but I always watch movies or play loud music so I can't do that... :?
 

Chris_Skeleton

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Considering this particular tarantula, I'd keep it near a window if I were you. Not necessarily IN the window, but near it. Where it can get the natural day and night change. This species tends to go on long fasting periods because it hasn't adjusted in captivity and the seasonal changes. Keeping it in the dark all the time is unnatural.
I believe keeping it near a window is not recommended. Considering they live in burrows or stay in their hide, how is keeping it in the dark unnatural? Ts do not need a day and night cycle from what I understand. Mine don't get it and they do just fine. Many other users Ts also do not get that change.


Contrary to belief, tarantulas do move and are active during the day. While hunting and feeding is mostly done at night.
Contrary to Dawgpounds belief, we all know that Ts do move and are active during the day. Hunting and feeding is also done during the day unless you feed them at night.

Also want to mention, it's the males that tend to go on huge fasting periods. Molting, captivity issues, or while in it's final mating period.
No it is not just the males that go on huge fasting periods. Females will also do this and it is not rare for them to. And considering all Ts fast during molting periods, that would mean it is not just G. rosea males that do this. And a T will fast if there are captivity issues, and once again, not just males, and not just this species.

To Op, I would suggest sticking to what others have said and completely disregard Dawgpounds post. He doesn't take others advice and does not know enough to give any advice.

Good Luck
 

Bill S

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I believe keeping it near a window is not recommended. Considering they live in burrows or stay in their hide, how is keeping it in the dark unnatural? Ts do not need a day and night cycle from what I understand. Mine don't get it and they do just fine. Many other users Ts also do not get that change.
I tend to avoid placing mine near a window only because that's where there's the poorest control over temperature. A cage sitting in our desert summer sunshine can reach lethal temperatures in a surprisingly short time. But it's worth noting that wild tarantulas around here are often seen sitting near the openings of their burrows in daylight hours, and sometimes out moving around. The common assumption that they always avoid daylight in the wild simply isn't true.

....Hunting and feeding is also done during the day unless you feed them at night.
Agreed. While I sometimes have individuals that prefer to eat at night, the vast majority of my tarantulas eat when food is dropped into the cage - which is often during the day, and always when the light is turned on.

No it is not just the males that go on huge fasting periods.
Again, agreed. Rosies in particular have a reputation for going for long spells without eating. I suspect this is sometimes the aftermath of a long period of overfeeding. I rarely feed mine more than one cricket on a given day, and try to feed only enough to maintain a "healthily plump" abdomen, not one that looks like it might burst at any moment. Perhaps as a result of this, I rarely have "hunger strikes" other than around molting episodes.

To Op, I would suggest sticking to what others have said and completely disregard ======='s post. He doesn't take others advice and does not know enough to give any advice.
A good general rule, both here and on other internet sites, is to browse for a while and compare the information that ANYONE gives you. There's a lot of bad info out there, and you shouldn't swallow everything you're given.
 

NickxEdge

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Oct 17, 2010
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Thanks for the replies guys!
Fist, no it's not wood chips, I read up that much on them haha it's actualy Coco fibers, I took the plastic vine thing out of it too!

I'm a little confused on whether I should get another tank for her, so I guess i'll keep it because some of ya'll say it's not THAT big of a deal.

It is near my TV, so i'll get he away from that as we speak! and as long as the water thing isn't to bigga deal!
and i'll take the light away seeing as it's not nessasary!

Thanks guys!

-Nick
 

NickxEdge

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P.S. Is there an instant messaging kinda deal on this website so I can chat with some of ya'll? haha I've got a lot to learn...
 

2oCHEVYo0

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No sadly there is not an instant chat function on here :( How big is it anyways? Like I said earlier, the enclosure isn't really a problem but I do personally recommend searching Craigslist or LPS for 5.5-10 gallon tanks as it is a Terrestrial.
 

KnightinGale

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Heh, personally I absolutely love those enclosures, regardless of tarantula type. I think most people mentioned it more anyway not because it was bad, but because it was more than you would need. Those ones are quite bulky if you have alot of tarantulas and need to optimize shelf-space, which obviously isn't a problem here (yet.) ;) And as was said, with a terrestrial (rather than arboreal) tarantula, it has more height than you need and they can be more expensive than another enclosure that would suit your tarantula just as well.
I put the first tarantula I got (she is terrestrial) into one though and still have her in there because I like it. I love the ventilation options, the built-in lock and the top and front openings. Plus it's schnazzy! As another poster said, the substrate should go right up to the door pretty much, if you haven't already. The only thing I would add is that I found the backing that came with the cage a real pain. I couldn't tell if in the picture you still had it in or not, but I got sick of mine and took it out. It may add something to the look, but I found it way more trouble than it was worth. There is a gap in the top where crickets would always climb up to and hang out instead of walking around on the bottom getting eaten. :rolleyes: My girl actually learned to go up there and poke a leg in to fish them out (they'd jump out, she'd pounce, problem solved) but feeders would also chew on the top and bottom trying to make escape routes. Some of them made it and then got stuck in the back where they died and were impossible to clean. I got tired of losing crickets and mealworms and having their carcasses mess up my cage. The backing pulls right off without leaving residue. Up to you, but thought I'd share my experience in case it helped. (Sorry, if it is already gone just disregard that paragraph.)
 

AgentD006las

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The enclosure is a big deal. Only one person said that and frankly they dont know what they're talking about. If your T climbs to the top and falls it can very well break its leg or ruture its abdomen resulting in death. Get a different cage! :embarrassed:

Move your T away from the TV so it doesnt have to feel those vibrations all day. As long as there is a window in the room ambient light will due just fine. Keep your T away from any open windows.

I recommend going with the advice from people who have been on the boards for more than a couple months. :rolleyes: They are the people who know what they are talking about. :barf:

The first thing you should do is read the tarantula keepers guide. That will answer all the questions you have. I didnt see a water dish, But just to be safe make sure you dont have cotton or paper towels in there. Just a clean full water dish. Enjoy your new pet and welcome to the addiction! {D

Humidity and temp gauges are an unnessecarry eye sore and waist of money. You shouldnt worry about either. If your comfortable so is your G. rosea.
 
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