My Roaches

Hisserdude

Arachnoking
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I'm betting the nymphs mimic something else. Possibly juvenile assassin bugs?
Probably, and it would appear that Panesthia nymphs attempt to mimic the same model... There's something poisonous or with a nasty bite widespread across Asia that has an orange spot on it's back that these roach genera are mimicking. 😂
 

schmiggle

Arachnoking
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Might also be infra-red or UV imitation that only shows up to us as an orange spot, even if the orange spot's not present on the model.

Also, might the nymphs be toxic but the adults not? I know efts of eastern newts are much more brightly colored than the adults and much more toxic, though of course the big difference is that efts and adults basically don't overlap in terms of microhabitat (efts are terrestrial, adults are aquatic).
 

Hisserdude

Arachnoking
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Might also be infra-red or UV imitation that only shows up to us as an orange spot, even if the orange spot's not present on the model.

Also, might the nymphs be toxic but the adults not? I know efts of eastern newts are much more brightly colored than the adults and much more toxic, though of course the big difference is that efts and adults basically don't overlap in terms of microhabitat (efts are terrestrial, adults are aquatic).
Yeah, could be! 😄

I don't think so, at least with Paranauphoeta I know people who have used them as feeders for their geckos and stuff with no issues, they seem to be perfectly edible. I'd assume the same would be true for Panesthia, but since those are so slow growing and breeding I don't think anyone's tried using them as feeders before. 😂
 

schmiggle

Arachnoking
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Yeah, could be! 😄

I don't think so, at least with Paranauphoeta I know people who have used them as feeders for their geckos and stuff with no issues, they seem to be perfectly edible. I'd assume the same would be true for Panesthia, but since those are so slow growing and breeding I don't think anyone's tried using them as feeders before. 😂
Actually, I have a guess--what about fireflies? They're toxic, and many have a red spot on the back and are otherwise black. They're also very numerous in Southeast Asia. See, for example: https://flic.kr/p/7V2XDL
Lemme know if I'm polluting your thread or whatever.
 

MrGhostMantis

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Actually, I have a guess--what about fireflies? They're toxic, and many have a red spot on the back and are otherwise black. They're also very numerous in Southeast Asia. See, for example: https://flic.kr/p/7V2XDL
Lemme know if I'm polluting your thread or whatever.
Sheesh, had to avert my eyes from that. Why a picture during such a private moment!? So many peeping toms in the insect world. 😂
 

Hisserdude

Arachnoking
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Actually, I have a guess--what about fireflies? They're toxic, and many have a red spot on the back and are otherwise black. They're also very numerous in Southeast Asia. See, for example: https://flic.kr/p/7V2XDL
Lemme know if I'm polluting your thread or whatever.
Could be, though Paranauphoeta spend most of their time under bark, and Panesthia nymphs deep in rotten logs, so I'd expect the thing they mimic would also be found in those same habitats... Which still makes me think they must be mimicking assassin bug nymphs or something.
 
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