My newest scorpion.

funk

Arachnopeon
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I believe it is a Urodacus yaschenkoi, but I could be wrong because I am still new to this whole thing.. some comformation would be great :)

Sorry about the poor quality my sisters camera is rubbish.

 

Alakdan

Arachnoangel
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I'm not faniliar with the species, but just the same, nice scorp!
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
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I'll assume your from Australia then? This is a pretty interesting species IMO.
 

funk

Arachnopeon
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Thanks Alakdan.

And yeah Gigas I am from Australia, Sydney to be more specific :).
 

Mark Newton

Arachnobaron
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Looks like U yaschenkoi. Check the ungues (claws) on the rear feet, you should only see one claw on each foot. You MUST keep this species in an air tight container or it will die. Small amount of water in soil, just enough to saturate the atmosphere. Do not use water dishes, they take water up via osmosis from desert sand. They develop around -500kPa in accordance with haemolyph osmolality. 20-25C. Good luck.
 

funk

Arachnopeon
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Oh wow thanks for the heads up.. I will go remove the small water-dish I have in the tank now.. the scorp was sitting in the dish before, I take it that that was bad for it?..
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
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What habitat would this species occupy in the wild?
 

Aillith

Arachnosquire
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Was likely sitting in the water dish because it was dehydrated.

Did you get it from a pet store? I picked up my U.yaschenkoi from a pet store. They sold it under the name 'desert scorpion', and as one would expect from a pet store, had it in a completely inadequate set-up. Mine spent it's time sitting on it's bottlecap also until I fixed up the tank.

Listen to Mark's advice, he knows what he's doing when it comes to these species :)

Nice to know of other Sydneysiders getting into scorps :)
 

Mark Newton

Arachnobaron
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What habitat would this species occupy in the wild?

Desert burrower in hot dry conditions. They live in loose dune soils and dig to a depth where moisture reaches 1.5% by weight. They are a 'sit and wait' predator, they are rarely surface active, hence they are highly susceptible to water loss.

The mouth of their burrow acts as a trap....very clever. Similar to an ant-lion.
 

Aillith

Arachnosquire
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What habitat would this species occupy in the wild?
Mark has all sorts of information about them and their burrows at his website.

Generally desert, but they dig themselves deep spiralling burrows and arn't all that surface active. They avoid the heat of the desert by spending their time in their very humid burrows.
 

funk

Arachnopeon
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Here are some pics I just took of how I am keeping him/her:

Some tips of where I am going wrong would be great, I put some cling rap over the enclosure for the 'air tightness', hopefully that works?



 

EAD063

Arachnoprince
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Have we found the Aussie equivalent of an Emperor? Rarely surfaces, hmm sounds familiar. lol So Mark, is this more of an interesting than "fun" species to keep? Sounds fragile.
 

Mark Newton

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Have we found the Aussie equivalent of an Emperor? Rarely surfaces, hmm sounds familiar. lol So Mark, is this more of an interesting than "fun" species to keep? Sounds fragile.
Hi Ed

I dont consider any scorpions I keep as 'fun' species, I guess because for me it's the science in it that takes my interest rather then the pet idea. I was studying scorpions long before I ever decided to keep them alive in captivity. Whenever I found a scorpion once upon a time it would end up in CH3CH2-OH.....:D But....this species can be interesting to keep, I just dont set up situations where they can burrow...well, I do with some for experimental reasons. If the container they are in is sealed the humidity reaches that of their burrows >95% and this can be achieved with only a very small amount of water in the soil as is the case in the desert environment. So, as far as the scorpion is concerned it is already in its burrow. Scorpions only burrow to reach favourable environmental conditions. I havent been doing the keeping in captivity thing all that long, nearly 7 years now I guess.
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
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The mouth of their burrow acts as a trap....very clever. Similar to an ant-lion.
Very interesting, have you seen the behaviour in captivity? or do they just treat the whole enclosure as a burrow?

Read you last post, have ever managed to achieve a burrow in captivity?
 

EAD063

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Thanks for a great explaination of that. You do a great job of mimicing natural enviroment and observing they're natural behavior! You know what I meant by fun, haha, why do you think I put it in quotations. {D Thanks once again.
 

Mark Newton

Arachnobaron
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You know what I meant by fun, haha, why do you think I put it in quotations. {D Thanks once again.
Yeah...new exactly what you meant by fun..some species are more interesting to keep than others, that's for sure. For me, I guess Urodacus elongatus would be the best 'keeper' scorpion. Big and entertaining.

I get a big kick out of understanding what animals do in the wild.
 

Mark Newton

Arachnobaron
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Very interesting, have you seen the behaviour in captivity? or do they just treat the whole enclosure as a burrow?

Read you last post, have ever managed to achieve a burrow in captivity?
Yes...I first observed closeup the action of removing dirt from the burrow through glass and then realised exactly how the patella sand combs work. If you set up a tank with an open top they will burrow and form the trapping mouth to the burrow. I have one in this situation at present and it has blocked the burrow mouth off to reduce water loss and increase humidity inside the burrow...as the sand dries out. I have pipes to add water to the base though, so it can be sucked back up into the sand. They only treat the whole enclosure as a burrow if the humidity is very high.

Both shots of the burrow mouth taken in the wild. The sand in the mouth is kept very loose and steep such that anything walking into it has a great deal of difficulty getting out, which then makes it much easier for the scorpion. I have witnessed centipedes at the mouth though...eating the scorpion.

 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
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Do you think the centipedes deliberately prey upon these scorpions?
I am starting to hate this thread, an extremely interesting beautiful scorpion that the chances are i won't get my hands on!
 

funk

Arachnopeon
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Do you think the centipedes deliberately prey upon these scorpions?
I am starting to hate this thread, an extremely interesting beautiful scorpion that the chances are i won't get my hands on!
You could always move to Australia? Your dollar is worth heaps here ;)!


Ps. Scorp seems to be going well.. from what I can see, I hope how I have him set up is ok?
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
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Its pounds over here, and Moving to australia is something I would love to do when i'm older.
 
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