My first Tarantula

WilliamRP1988

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
5
Hi, my name is William, I am 22. I've been looking into Tarantulas. I've read a lot on them, but I get the feeling life experience will be a much better teacher. I've read up on three species I have yet to decide between, two of which I am fairly certain about, the third is what this thread will be on.

My picks which, I might add, two of which are said to be fairly docile:

1.Brachypelma Smithi

2.N. coloratvillosus/ Nhando cromatus (They look the same to me, maybe someone could help me with this one aswell.)

3. Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater-Lasiodora parahybana


Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater- Lasiodora parahybana.

I have heard conflicting reports that this is either the best beginners T, or a moderately advanced keepers pet. I just need someone to clarify, I do realize some of it is just the T's temperament and that they are all the same-regardless, a generalization couldn't hurt.

I know it eats a ton, all the sources I've read had said the same thing. Another thing they both agreed on is its a massive T, the third largest at something like 10 inches in, 1 through 6 inches within a single year. Generally it likes high humidity.
 

Caramell

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
145
Hi, my name is William, I am 22. I've been looking into Tarantulas. I've read a lot on them, but I get the feeling life experience will be a much better teacher. I've read up on three species I have yet to decide between, two of which I am fairly certain about, the third is what this thread will be on.

My picks which, I might add, two of which are said to be fairly docile:

1.Brachypelma Smithi

2.N. coloratvillosus/ Nhando cromatus (They look the same to me, maybe someone could help me with this one aswell.)

3. Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater-Lasiodora parahybana


Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater- Lasiodora parahybana.

I have heard conflicting reports that this is either the best beginners T, or a moderately advanced keepers pet. I just need someone to clarify, I do realize some of it is just the T's temperament and that they are all the same-regardless, a generalization couldn't hurt.

I know it eats a ton, all the sources I've read had said the same thing. Another thing they both agreed on is its a massive T, the third largest at something like 10 inches in, 1 through 6 inches within a single year. Generally it likes high humidity.
Out of the three species you chose, the B.smithi is considered the best beginner for handling(though many do not recommend it as there is a risk of hurting the T). The Nhandu and Lasiodora species are usually skittish and unhandle able, but if you check youtube, there have been some docile individuals. I have an L.difficilis, and she is very nervous and does not like to be disturbed, and kicks hairs frequently. So, unless you're planning to handle the T, any of your choices will do.
The difference between the N.coloratovillosus and N.chromatus is very obvious, the former is fluffy and pretty and the latter is less fluffy but just as pretty. {D I have a tiny sling N.coloratovillosus, they are fast growers and are voracious eaters. Either species is awesome, IMO.

Lasiodora sp. is considered a beginner T because of its fast growth rate, its nonstop eating, and its huge size(great for a display). High humidity isn't usually necessary, a water dish will do that job. I keep my L. difficilis on peat with a water bowl, I dont mist, but I do overflow the waterbowl on occassions.

I hope I answered your questions, I may have missed something. :)
 

WilliamRP1988

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
5
Out of the three species you chose, the B.smithi is considered the best beginner for handling(though many do not recommend it as there is a risk of hurting the T). The Nhandu and Lasiodora species are usually skittish and unhandle able, but if you check youtube, there have been some docile individuals. I have an L.difficilis, and she is very nervous and does not like to be disturbed, and kicks hairs frequently. So, unless you're planning to handle the T, any of your choices will do.
The difference between the N.coloratovillosus and N.chromatus is very obvious, the former is fluffy and pretty and the latter is less fluffy but just as pretty. {D I have a tiny sling N.coloratovillosus, they are fast growers and are voracious eaters. Either species is awesome, IMO.

Lasiodora sp. is considered a beginner T because of its fast growth rate, its nonstop eating, and its huge size(great for a display). High humidity isn't usually necessary, a water dish will do that job. I keep my L. difficilis on peat with a water bowl, I dont mist, but I do overflow the waterbowl on occassions.

I hope I answered your questions, I may have missed something. :)

You have indeed answered my questions for now, and I thank you for it. As for the difference between N.coloratovillosus and N.chromatus--All I could see was one had a red red rump and the other didn't. ^^;; I thought the T's that you mentioned were very attractive. I also came across an image of a Haplopelma lividum Cobalt Blue-They are beautiful. o.o but they seem like an aggressive type.
 

killy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 20, 2009
Messages
249
... I get the feeling life experience will be a much better teacher ...
Worked for me! And here's what I've learned: the care and feeding of the B smithi and the LP, as well as the other 8 species in my brood, is exactly the same, and ridiculously easy.

Here's the recipe:
- choose 1 enclosure
- add substrate, water dish and a hide
- add 1 tarantula
- Allow to sit.
- Add crickets
- Enjoy!
 

Caramell

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
145
You have indeed answered my questions for now, and I thank you for it. As for the difference between N.coloratovillosus and N.chromatus--All I could see was one had a red red rump and the other didn't. ^^;; I thought the T's that you mentioned were very attractive. I also came across an image of a Haplopelma lividum Cobalt Blue-They are beautiful. o.o but they seem like an aggressive type.
H. lividums are an Old World species, so as they may not have urticating hairs, they make up for that in attitude. The correct term to use here would be "defensive", and not "aggressive", because they are protecting themselves and are not chasing you down for the fun of it. As long as you respect the tarantula, it is usually easier to manipulate it. ;)
 

WilliamRP1988

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
5
H. lividums are an Old World species, so as they may not have urticating hairs, they make up for that in attitude. The correct term to use here would be "defensive", and not "aggressive", because they are protecting themselves and are not chasing you down for the fun of it. As long as you respect the tarantula, it is usually easier to manipulate it. ;)
I'd love for it to "chase" down my uncle for humor sakes as he is afeared of any kind of large spider or snakes. :p Of course I would not let him hurt it, but would definitely give perspective lol.



Worked for me! And here's what I've learned: the care and feeding of the B smithi and the LP, as well as the other 8 species in my brood, is exactly the same, and ridiculously easy.

Here's the recipe:
- choose 1 enclosure
- add substrate, water dish and a hide
- add 1 tarantula
- Allow to sit.
- Add crickets
- Enjoy!
That certainly sounds easy Killy. :D

Okay, as far as spiderlings or 'slings'- what is acceptable as a comfortable home for the little guys? Say, a B.Smithi (Generally a beginning T.)? I've heard of handlers keeping them in ...pill bottles?
 
Last edited:

jimip

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 26, 2010
Messages
103
so im still a noob and may always be one. but this much i know when you get a sling, it will most likely come in a vial or deli container of some sort. you can leave it in there for a molt or 2, depending on the sling and containers size. then move it up a step to either a bigger deli container or small critter keeper when it needs a bit more room, if you keep upgrading on that level you should be fine. depending on your species you should get it into a tank. i believe i was told anything over 7 inches should probably be in about a 20 long ( or at least that footprint, Marty made makes a 7.5 squat if you dont want then climbing to high)..... so thats what i think i know but it should help you get the right track.
 

aquaArachnid

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2008
Messages
280
i agree with the Lasiodora species. They are skittish but do make a great display species
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
Here are the top three starter species, IMO.

1. G. pulchripes (Chaco Golden Knee). I have first hand experience with two adult females of this species. They are extremely docile, never thrown a threat, and one of them kicks hairs rarely, if ever. Many others will tell you how docile and great these spiders are. Grow to be about 7-8" and awesome black with golden coloration.

2. E. campestratus (Pink Zebra Beauty). Supposedly the most docile species. Rarely kicks hairs. Similar to G. pulchripes in appearance, but have cream colored markings and pink hairs.

3. G. pulchra (Brazilian Black). Another extremely docile T. Also rarely kicks hairs. They are a beautiful black all over. Probably the top recommended beginner species.

From what I've read and gathered, I would say these are the top three starter species out there, but I only have experience with G. pulchripes.
 

Midknight xrs

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
132
I have the Brachypelma Smithi and the Lasidora Parahybana. My smithi is a little slow but who knows, it's been mad since i moved it to it's new home almost 2 months ago. the LP is still under an inch but is about to molt a 3rd time since i got it in august. I've wanted the Nhandu, but i'm not sure which one and i just don't have room.

Either way, you'll want more then one, so go for all three/four and go from there.
 

forrestpengra

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 11, 2009
Messages
732
Get one of each. They will each teach you something. I have multiples of each you listed and you won't be disappointed. I'm personally a sucker for brachys though.
 

popcangenie

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 6, 2010
Messages
135
my choice would be the smith very good beginner and they have nice colors good luck and welcome to the hobby you will have 10 tarantulas in no time!
 

brian abrams

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2009
Messages
75
First T

The Smithi is a great beginner T. The LP is much faster, much faster growing, grows much larger, and is more skittish. Not really an aggressive T though, in terms of threat postures. The 2 Nhandu sp. are also fast growing, grow larger than the Smithi (but not as large as the LP), are very attractive like the Smithi, but are considered aggressive by NW standards (likely to bite). Also, all 4 of the species are quick to throw hair.
 

WilliamRP1988

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
5
The Smithi is a great beginner T. The LP is much faster, much faster growing, grows much larger, and is more skittish. Not really an aggressive T though, in terms of threat postures. The 2 Nhandu sp. are also fast growing, grow larger than the Smithi (but not as large as the LP), are very attractive like the Smithi, but are considered aggressive by NW standards (likely to bite). Also, all 4 of the species are quick to throw hair.
Are Females or males typically more prone to being "laid back"?
 

Vespula

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 27, 2010
Messages
707
I advise getting a female if possible. In my experience, they're calmer. They also live longer.
 
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