My Australian non-T primitives

Ftang5

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Not to be that person, but all tarantulas are mygalomorphs. 🌠
Oh.... i have been using that term incorrectly then. I thought they were therasopods. Then whats the term for trapdoors, funnel webs and the like?
 

RezonantVoid

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Oh.... i have been using that term incorrectly then. I thought they were therasopods. Then whats the term for trapdoors, funnel webs and the like?
Theraphosidae is a subfamily of Mygalmorphae, we just tend to coin any non-tarantula primitive as Mygalmorph to differentiate the 2
 

Ungoliant

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Oh.... i have been using that term incorrectly then. I thought they were therasopods. Then whats the term for trapdoors, funnel webs and the like?
Mygalomorphs are an infraorder (smaller than an order but bigger than a family or superfamily) that comprises Theraphosidae (tarantulas) and most of the other extant "primitive" families of spiders, such as funnel-web spiders and trapdoor spiders. Most other spiders are araneomorphs and are often called "true spiders" (even though both groups are spiders).

Certain mygalomorph traits are considered more "primitive," because they appeared early in the evolution of spiders and haven't changed much from those of early spiders. Certain araneomorph traits are deemed more "advanced," because they appeared more recently and have undergone notable change from ancestral traits. However, you can't really say that araneomorphs as a whole are "more advanced" or "more evolved" than mygalomorphs, as they are both equally separated in time from the common ancestor of spiders.

An easy way to distinguish between mygalomorphs and araneomorphs is the way the jaws and fangs move when in use. Mygalomorph fangs move in parallel, swinging up along an arc before a strike. Araneomorph fangs move in opposition to each other, resembling pincers. Some good illustrations that show the difference:




Theraphosidae is a subfamily of Mygalmorphae, we just tend to coin any non-tarantula primitive as Mygalmorph to differentiate the 2
Taxonomically speaking, Theraphosidae is a family. (Anything ending in -idae is a family. Anything ending in -inae is a subfamily.)
 

Ftang5

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Mygalomorphs are an infraorder (smaller than an order but bigger than a family or superfamily) that comprises Theraphosidae (tarantulas) and most of the other extant "primitive" families of spiders, such as funnel-web spiders and trapdoor spiders. Most other spiders are araneomorphs and are often called "true spiders" (even though both groups are spiders).

Certain mygalomorph traits are considered more "primitive," because they appeared early in the evolution of spiders and haven't changed much from those of early spiders. Certain araneomorph traits are deemed more "advanced," because they appeared more recently and have undergone notable change from ancestral traits. However, you can't really say that araneomorphs as a whole are "more advanced" or "more evolved" than mygalomorphs, as they are both equally separated in time from the common ancestor of spiders.

An easy way to distinguish between mygalomorphs and araneomorphs is the way the jaws and fangs move when in use. Mygalomorph fangs move in parallel, swinging up along an arc before a strike. Araneomorph fangs move in opposition to each other, resembling pincers. Some good illustrations that show the difference:






Taxonomically speaking, Theraphosidae is a family. (Anything ending in -idae is a family. Anything ending in -inae is a subfamily.)
I understand the differences between araneo and mygalmorphs but i find it odd that a very clearly distinct set of spiders is classed the same as theraphso's. Are we sure there isnt a seperate group for the waxy-carapaced funnel webs & trap doors?
 

Ungoliant

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I understand the differences between araneo and mygalmorphs but i find it odd that a very clearly distinct set of spiders is classed the same as theraphso's. Are we sure there isnt a seperate group for the waxy-carapaced funnel webs & trap doors?
Currently they are all mygalomorphs, just placed in different families.

This is similar to how araneomorph families have great diversity.
 

RezonantVoid

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Guys, Yukinoshita had her big night last night, and i was just in time to see the end of it. Someone's gonna be insanely shiny in the next few days
20200307_225038.jpg
20200307_223845.jpg
 

Borttor

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Super stoked to be receiving them, but please no rush! You've had it that close with the fires, please take the time to get everything back under control there first ;)
Also had a reply from my funnelweb dude down south and he agrees that the webs you saw definitely are more like an Atrax species. He needs photos to confirm, but glad my hunch was correct


There's many times where I say to myself "DAYUM that's pretty, I wish I could have that!", But in general I feel very happy with the variety I can get now
1 I applaud you Brave than I am I'm just going to respond to this message thank you for sharing that was awesome and a lot of spiders are just gorgeous
I've been asked to make this thread a few times, but the sheer quantity and shyness of my specimens has made me procrastinate on it for a while. But hey, Ive got a 4 hour car trip and a bunch of elusive specimens Ive finally photographed, so let's get down to it today.

I will try and rattle off certain groups in seperate responses, starting with my trapdoors and finishing with my medically significant species.

The following spiders are only a pinch out of the salt bowl so to speak. There are literally hundreds of mygalomorph species here i'd love a shot at keeping, but realistically that's not possible. However, through a lot of effort and just under 2 years, I think I'm pretty happy with the variety Ive got so far. From regular open hole dwellers and tube builders to carefully concealed trapdoors and species that just gave up being neat and make huge web messes, there's something for every spider enthusiast to enjoy (hopefully).

So, now that the grand speech is over, lets begin!
Thank you so much for sharing your spiders are absolutely beautiful by the way the new arrival I'm in 100% agreement with you once that mud is off she's going to be beautiful.
 

RezonantVoid

Hollow Knight
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It looks like if p.irminia was a mygalmorph! Gorgeous!
She molted yesterday and once she's hardened 100% ill show you how awesome the stripes look now. There should be a couple of these still available on the insectory btw, i bought the 6th one left
 

RezonantVoid

Hollow Knight
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I understand the differences between araneo and mygalmorphs but i find it odd that a very clearly distinct set of spiders is classed the same as theraphso's. Are we sure there isnt a seperate group for the waxy-carapaced funnel webs & trap doors?
I was rereading this, some trapdoors like those in Barychelidae are so much like tarantulas in appearance and characteristics that a novice entemologist would easily mistake them as a T without prior research. They can climb cmooth surfaces and stridulate, and the latter characteristic isnt limited to just them and Theraphosidae as ive had bearded wishbone males that could quite audibly hiss too. On closer inspection, we can find multiple similarities between each family other than just appearance
 

Ftang5

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I was rereading this, some trapdoors like those in Barychelidae are so much like tarantulas in appearance and characteristics that a novice entemologist would easily mistake them as a T without prior research. They can climb cmooth surfaces and stridulate, and the latter characteristic isnt limited to just them and Theraphosidae as ive had bearded wishbone males that could quite audibly hiss too. On closer inspection, we can find multiple similarities between each family other than just appearance
Mabye barchychelidae is the "found link" between Theraphso's and the waxy carapaced, smoother bodied and usually more agressive trapdoors and funnelwebs...
 

RezonantVoid

Hollow Knight
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Mabye barchychelidae is the "found link" between Theraphso's and the waxy carapaced, smoother bodied and usually more agressive trapdoors and funnelwebs...
Nemessidae and some Idiopids like the shiny Arbanitis also have very densely packed hair on the carapace instead of if being shiny, and the ultra sensitive foot hair on the pedipalps. I would probably call Nemessidae the closest "bridge genus"
 
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