my 2 babies arrived,advice any1??

soulreaver_x01

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 23, 2007
Messages
46
im new at this,but here goes,i bought a 1inch singapore blue,who is in a very small tupperware bowl,with peat moss,and a hiding spot,its about 80deg.it has dissapeared allready..i also have a 2inch hatian brown,same set up,bigger tupperware bowl,lol..they both seem to be happy..any more advice??how often should i feed them?what all can i feed them besides crickets?thanx 4 the help!!

mike b.
 

Austin S.

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 9, 2006
Messages
1,989
Hey there. Not just you, but anyone before ordering something, should check it out first. See what kind of care the species has to have and such, especially a Cyriopagopus "blue". Anyways, I can help you out with the blue, I myself love this species and have aquired 16 as of right now. For the baby blue, if you have it, put it into a little vial or something with some peat moss. This species loves to burrow at a young age, so be sure and provide it with plenty of peat, but don't go overboard. Also, At something in there so that it can attach it's webbing to, it is really not necessary, but some people do it. You can use fake plant, cork bark, drift wood, etc. These baby blues require a lot of humidity as youngens. When all of mine were 1"+, I'd mist them at least 2-3 times a week. Make sure you have plenty of ventilation so that b/c you mist, no fungi will grow or anything. Hope this helps somewhat and if you have anymore Q's, feel free to ask, you're in the right place to do so. :)


Austin
 

tacoma0680

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
Messages
309
I would not feed them anything but crickets, mealworms, roaches some of the Ts will not eat the mealworms and for the roaches if you start them now they should be fine if you are going to go with the roaches then feed them nymphs.
 

Mina

Arachnoking
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Joined
Oct 4, 2005
Messages
2,136
Don't worry, it is perfectly normal for Singapore blue slings to disappear, I saw mine the day I bought it 4 months ago and haven't since. I throw small cricket down the hole and twice now a shed skin has been chucked back out. Just feed small crickets. They are usually both really good eaters.
 

Spyder 1.0

Arachnoprince
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Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Messages
1,016
be very carefull of ventilation. i keep my singapore blue sling in a jam jar with like a hundred large holes punched out of the lid, but even this wasnt enough, and i had fungi growing. (this was mainly because i used tree twigs and they rot very easy. its best not to use any wood unless its hardened corkbark. use some moss(bought at petmart) and the sling will make a nice funnel web with it close to the substrait. remove anything dead in the cage within 24 hours. good luck
 

Parahybana3590

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 23, 2006
Messages
162
With the blue, since it requires moisture, use vermiculite. Vermiculite retains moisture well and will help keep up humidity. Also, mites cannot live on vermiculite.

The Phormictopus cancerides, keep on moist peat.

Assuming you only have 2 tarantulas, use crickets. As you get more tarantulas it would be smart to get a colony of roaches. Be SURE to take the back legs off of the crickets(the jumping legs) b/c there have been instances where the crickets have kicked through a t's abdomin and killed the t.

Congrats on your new additions, welcome to the addiction {D
 

wburke17

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
134
be very carefull of ventilation. i keep my singapore blue sling in a jam jar with like a hundred large holes punched out of the lid, but even this wasnt enough, and i had fungi growing. (this was mainly because i used tree twigs and they rot very easy. its best not to use any wood unless its hardened corkbark. use some moss(bought at petmart) and the sling will make a nice funnel web with it close to the substrait. remove anything dead in the cage within 24 hours. good luck
show your spiders some respect and put them in real cages.... jars who would have thought, huh
 

IdahoBiteyThing

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 2, 2007
Messages
599
dead horse

show your spiders some respect and put them in real cages.... jars who would have thought, huh
This topic was beat to DEATH on another thread. Let it go. Jars, tupperware, deli containers, Kritter Keepers, aquariums, acrylic display cubes, etc. etc. etc. all make fine T environments. Would an antique bell jar, hand-blown in the late 1800's and accented with a nice band of gold leaf be a respectful enough container? The thread is about cultural requirements, specifically what and how often to feed. The T's don't care about their containers as long as they're set up to meet their cultural needs with respect to humidity, substrate etc.IMHO, paying attention to proper care of your T's is wayyy more respectful than whether you choose paper or plastic, er, jelly jars or aquariums. That being said, for slings this size, I agree that crickets, roaches, mealworms are all good. I'm a roach fan, and even if you don't start a big colony, a bunch of nymphs are perfect for keeping on hand to feed. Check out some of the roach threads on the board for species pro's and con's and housing info. IMO the absolutely very best thing about roaches is that most of them have no smell, unlike crickets, which make me wanna hurl every time I get a whiff of them. For small T's I also like mealworms, since you can keep a container in the frig for weeks, pick out the size you like, and toss it in with little worry of injury to your sling. Hope this helps. Tony
 

julesaussies

Arachnobaron
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Apr 15, 2007
Messages
577
Meal worms for T's

For small T's I also like mealworms, since you can keep a container in the frig for weeks, pick out the size you like, and toss it in with little worry of injury to your sling. Hope this helps. Tony
i was recently thinking about getting some meal worms for my slings since i feed them more often than my big guys. i hate catching those stupid crickets and they do stink! (mine live in a KK in the garage but i still have to smell them when i bring them in for T feeding!)

i like the convience of being able to keep the meal worms longer than most crickets last. Should the meal worms sit out for a while so they come to room temp before feeding the slings? Most all my slings grab their prey within minutes of being fed - do the meal worms burrow quickly? Do the meal worms need to be cut in half (for example) for really small slings? Thanks!
 

IdahoBiteyThing

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 2, 2007
Messages
599
mealworms

Depends on the T. For really small slings, I stick them in the freezer for a few minutes and then cut them into bite size pieces (easier to cut when frozen). For a little bit bigger slings, I freeze them for a few minutes to kill them, then put in whole. For even bigger T's that I know will dispatch them immediately, I just toss them in (yes, let them warm up, they'll move more). They will burrow, but you can also do the head squishy thing to prevent that (I <wussie can't do it with my fingers, so I use the flat side of the mealworm chopping knife if I'm so inclined, but usually don't).
 

julesaussies

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 15, 2007
Messages
577
Depends on the T. For really small slings, I stick them in the freezer for a few minutes and then cut them into bite size pieces (easier to cut when frozen). For a little bit bigger slings, I freeze them for a few minutes to kill them, then put in whole. For even bigger T's that I know will dispatch them immediately, I just toss them in (yes, let them warm up, they'll move more). They will burrow, but you can also do the head squishy thing to prevent that (I <wussie can't do it with my fingers, so I use the flat side of the mealworm chopping knife if I'm so inclined, but usually don't).
Thanks a lot. i've got to buy some crickets today and mice for the snake so i will definitely add meal worms to the list and give it a try. Thank you!
 

wburke17

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
134
This topic was beat to DEATH on another thread. Let it go. Jars, tupperware, deli containers, Kritter Keepers, aquariums, acrylic display cubes, etc. etc. etc. all make fine T environments. Would an antique bell jar, hand-blown in the late 1800's and accented with a nice band of gold leaf be a respectful enough container? The thread is about cultural requirements, specifically what and how often to feed. The T's don't care about their containers as long as they're set up to meet their cultural needs with respect to humidity, substrate etc.IMHO, paying attention to proper care of your T's is wayyy more respectful than whether you choose paper or plastic, er, jelly jars or aquariums. That being said, for slings this size, I agree that crickets, roaches, mealworms are all good. I'm a roach fan, and even if you don't start a big colony, a bunch of nymphs are perfect for keeping on hand to feed. Check out some of the roach threads on the board for species pro's and con's and housing info. IMO the absolutely very best thing about roaches is that most of them have no smell, unlike crickets, which make me wanna hurl every time I get a whiff of them. For small T's I also like mealworms, since you can keep a container in the frig for weeks, pick out the size you like, and toss it in with little worry of injury to your sling. Hope this helps. Tony
Thats exactly why i said that "sacarcism" was ment to that perticular person..
I use any container available....
 

JungleGuts

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 7, 2006
Messages
1,123
for the Phormictopus cancerides i recommend keeping it on dryer substrait and mist like once a week half of the container
 
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