millipedes

beetleman

Arachnoking
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beautiful pedes:clap: the fires are stunning! i used to keep the madg.fires awhile back always enjoyed them and man can they eat cucumbers{D
 

james

Arachnobaron
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Oct 20, 2003
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pedes

Thx, here are some more the firelegs and yellow banded from china that are much larger then the bumblebees. I have to take picture of the rest sometime next week.
James
 

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Arachnotized

Arachnosquire
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Wow...gorgeous pics! I especially like the yellow banded ones..they are incredible!:eek:
 

Kevin_Davies

Arachnoknight
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Your Madagascan Fire Millipedes looks like a South African Centrobolus species to me, rather than Aphistogoniulus sp (which are from Madagascar)

Your Spanish Millipedes are Ommatoiulus rutilans.
 

james

Arachnobaron
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pedes

Only the top picture was a fire the other picture was a malaysian species.
James
 

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james

Arachnobaron
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pedes

It may also be because they are young still and have not fully developed the pattern. Some of my larger ones have more of the black banding in them, but then again you never know they could be something else. I will have to take more pictures.
James
 

james

Arachnobaron
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Thanks, I actually kind of hope they are not the fires because the fires are easier to find. Can you identify any of the oher species? How are things going there in the UK? Hoping to have new cool new hormetica species soon.
James
 

ahas

Arachnodemon
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Jun 11, 2007
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Wow! Those are beautiful! I' ve never seen those ones before. :) The only Millipede I' ve seen are the Giant African Millipedes
 

Matt K

Arachnoangel
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Holy Smokin' Joe Camel! Awesome millipedes. Ahhh, if only money and time were no object.....
 

Ted

Arachnoprince
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My good friend Jungle Jim Klinger still holds the world record with his African species as far as i know, at about 15 inches.

nice pics, all!
 

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
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Thanks, I actually kind of hope they are not the fires because the fires are easier to find. Can you identify any of the oher species? How are things going there in the UK? Hoping to have new cool new hormetica species soon.
James
It's not easy to make them out in that photo but the actual fire millipedes have normal adult color at 1.5". If they don't look like the top left cover of the millipede book cover they're likely something else.
 

james

Arachnobaron
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Oct 20, 2003
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Kevin

I have confirmed that they are South African Centrobolus which is fine with me, know I just nned to find the Madagascar fires. I'll post some more pictures tomorrow in the afternoon. Plus I guess I should post some of the American species as well.
James
 

RoachGirlRen

Arachnoangel
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Jul 8, 2007
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WOW. If the health, beauty, and quality of your millipedes is any indication of how your roaches are, I think you just found yourself a customer ;)
 

james

Arachnobaron
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Oct 20, 2003
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474
Thx.

Thank you, I really have the BUG for millipedes and after so many years of roach collecting I have something new to keep me busy. lol my wallet is hurting!!!!!
James
 

millipeter

Arachnoknight
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Sep 8, 2005
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Nice millipedes.

The "firemillipede" is an undescribed species of the genus Centrobolus of the north-east of South Africa, near the border to Mocambique.
The brown one with the long pink legs is a species from Tansania. This species is quite difficult to breed. My girlfriend got it one time, but the larves died. Maybe this species like it a bit more dry than other species.
The yellow banded seem to be Anadenobolus sp. They are quite easy in keeping and breeding, similar to A. monilicornis.
The Ommatoiulus rutilans are a bit difficult to keep. This species lives in dry biotopes. So, keep them in a more or less dry tank with good air circulation where only one edge (under a stone, wood etc.) is always moist. Spray only one time the week. If you keep them only moist they will all die.

Where are the last 2 species from? From the Philippines?
 
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