Madagascan Pill Millipede

Baphomet

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
65
Just wondering if anyone has had any luck in keeping these Millipedes for extended periods.

If so, what conditions are you keeping them, and what are you using as a food source?

I have tried following the caresheets from various sources with absolutely no luck...the critters rarely last longer than 6 weeks.

Any advice, suggestions would be welcomed.
 

sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 13, 2003
Messages
1,294
I can't remember where I read about them:(

But, I do remember that the vendor could not
keep them alive either. Too bad because they
are interesting little critters. Sorry that I
could not help, maybe one of our experts can
help out here :rolleyes:
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
I know someone who purchased some of these last summer (6-8 months ago) and asked me about the care. I told her that they were probably doomed, but she could try giving them really rotten wood and leaf litter and keeping them moist. About a week ago, much to my surprise, she informs me that not only are they still alive, but they've grown! I asked her what her secret was, and she said she was doing exactly what I said above. I told her that if they reproduced she'd be a hero to millipede keepers the world over. She said she'd be expecting a badge of some kind :)

I doubt she's the first to try keeping them this way, but maybe she got lucky and got a batch who's gut fauna didn't die in transport (a popular theory explaining why these guys do poorly in captivity).

Wade
 

Steven

pede-a-holic
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 18, 2003
Messages
4,022
Hey, i've got a couple still alive (i bought them september last year) before i've also got a couple but i kept them on a to high temperature (23°C), these ones i keep today at 18° at night 15°C, they are eating much rotten leaves and wood from a nearby forest in my town (really really rotten wood, the kind that falls apart when you grab it) i allso keep them very humid, i spray twice a day with cold water.

If you gonna buy some, be sure you're the first to buy them at the store, the minute they arrive!!! chose the smallest and lightest ones (they get darker, the older they get) a young species is healtier then an older one, they must curl up very tight when you thouch them!!! a sign of good health

I hope i've given you some new info,...

Steven
Belgium Europe
 

Venom

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Messages
1,709
"Pill millipedes" eh? Maybe they should be called "pillipedes" ! lol !!=D :D
 

sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 13, 2003
Messages
1,294
FUNNY Venom!!LOL!

Nice pictures Steven. Maybe I will try to keep these sometime, but not now. I have way too many animals to take care of now.
I am really limited when it comes to space. :)
 

Midwest Art

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
280
Here's some info I found on them, I used to carry them but no one knows extactly how to keep them long term because of their dietary needs:

PILLBUGS
While this applies to most millipedes, there is a special group that requires particular conditions; these are commonly known as ‘pillipedes’ in the pet trade, or ‘giant pill bugs’. They are similar to the ‘monkey-pea’ or ‘pill’ woodlice which are familiar in gardens. They look a little like flattened millipedes, and can roll into a sphere when they feel threatened. Pillipedes require very special care, and are generally more suited to the expert keeper because of this. Novices should certainly never attempt to keep these species until they have more experience in this area.
A pillipede’s terrarium should be of a similar setup to a normal millipede’s, i.e. 3-4” of soil, with sphagnum moss and oak bark. Certain aspects of the normal set-up, however, need to be amended. For instance, there should be plenty of rotting oak bark available, as well as a plentiful supply of oak leaves, as they do not apparently eat anything else - not even the always-popular cucumber! They should be kept moist, but not too humid, although some humidity is good. These species dislike too much heat and they are best kept at 70ºF (21ºC). The longest anyone is reported to have kept these alive is six months. They are also extremely difficult to breed and raise. Only three reports of this are known, but as none of these can be proved, whether they are true remains in doubt.
There are three varieties of pillipede available on the market today - the emerald, the chocolate and the black. These, along with a large range of attractive typical millipedes, all come from Madagascar. Pillipedes can be kept with these millipedes, as their habitat is the same, and they are noted to cohabit well. They mix particularly well with the Madagascan fire millipede, a very beautiful millipede which has a bright red upper body, a black lower body, and yellow/orange legs. This species is thought by some to be the most beautiful millipede in the trade.

I had some cool pix of their undersides but can't locate at present.

N-Joy
Art
 
Top