Leiurus Vs Androctonus

Ilovepredators

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 7, 2014
Messages
82
We all know Leiurus quinquestriatus and Androctonus australis are said to be the most venomous scorpions in the world. Out of the 2 species I've heard the LD50 shows L. quinquestriatus to be more potent of these two species, but many argue A. australis is worse because they have killed more people. What I keep hearing is the most dangerous genus of scorpions is Androctonus, this is where my question starts. Why is Androctonus the most venomous genus? Why not Leiurus? I would think the genus Leiurus would be just as venomous as the genus Androctonus maybe worse, but as far as the genus Leiurus goes I only hear about quinquestriatus being dangerous. Are the other species of this genus much less venomous? Or maybe they haven't been studied as much? I am just curious what kind of info or opinions I will get on this subject. Thanks.
 

Ilovepredators

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 7, 2014
Messages
82
So in conclusion the question I am asking is why is the entire genus of Androctonus famous for being so venomous, but only the single species of L. quinquestriatus seems to be famous. The rest of the species from this genus don't seem to get mentioned. I would guess they have venom compairably potent to quinquestriatus. Maybe this genus isn't mentioned as much because it doesn't contain as many species as Androctonus?
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
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Jan 15, 2017
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Well, I'd imagine there are many factors that contribute to death statistics. There's probably variation in how much venom gets injected, proximity to medical facilities, etc....

I guess when it comes to a single species in a genus that gets more attention, it probably has a lot to do with people trying to identify the "deadliest one" species.

Who knows? As far as I'm concerned, they're all pretty dangerous! It's like comparing different temperature flames and their ability to burn your hand. After a certain point, it really doesn't matter.... haha!;)
 

RTTB

Arachnoprince
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Frequency of contact with humans, access to medical care, and probably a whole list of other variables would need to be factored in I think.
 

TheScorpionMan

Arachnoknight
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Jan 6, 2014
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190
So in conclusion the question I am asking is why is the entire genus of Androctonus famous for being so venomous, but only the single species of L. quinquestriatus seems to be famous. The rest of the species from this genus don't seem to get mentioned. I would guess they have venom compairably potent to quinquestriatus. Maybe this genus isn't mentioned as much because it doesn't contain as many species as Androctonus?
I've also heard androctonus inject more venom per sting than LQ. When it comes to the single species leiurus quinquestriatus used to be thought of as the only species in the genus
 

brancsikia339

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 11, 2013
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41
The only two Leiurus species that have been through the LD50 test (so far, at least that's all I can find; correct me if I'm wrong) were Leiurus quinquestriatus and Leiurus abdullahbayrami. LQ LD50 was listed as between 0.16 and 0.25 mg/kg, and LA is at 0.19 mg/kg. Both are significantly more potent than that of the highest Androctonus species (Androctonus mauretanicus at 0.31 mg/kg) and I'd assume that all the newly described Leiurus species are right up there with them. Even though Leiurus are more potent than Androctonus species drop for drop, they inject significantly less venom and are less commonly encountered near human habitation, resulting in less deaths. In my collection I've noticed my L. jordanensis are very skittish and nervous, much preferring to run and hide and have to be forced to sting. The only Androctonus I had was ready to sting if you walked past the cage (same thing with my Hottentotta franzwerneri)
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
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The only Androctonus I had was ready to sting if you walked past the cage (same thing with my Hottentotta franzwerneri)
Yup..... they definitely seem to be all about their sting! They walk around with their tails sticking straight up all the time. Like they KNOW they're packing:cool:
 

brolloks

Arachnobaron
Joined
Apr 6, 2016
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348
The majority of my male L. quinquestriatus are very defensive and go into the "tail in the air ready to destroy you in one swoop" mode as soon as I come close to their enclosures. They then start flicking their tails in the air and if I don't leave they will run into their hide.

My females are all very "docile" and don't really display any sort of defensive behavior. They will either just sit still while I clean their enclosures or run and hide.

The males in my collections behavior is best described by this video I found on Youtube:
 

brancsikia339

Arachnopeon
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Jun 11, 2013
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Wow, neither my male or female have ever shown that kind of defensiveness. They haven't even threat posed. It really must depend on not only genus and species, but the individual animal as well.
 

TheScorpionMan

Arachnoknight
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Jan 6, 2014
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Wow, neither my male or female have ever shown that kind of defensiveness. They haven't even threat posed. It really must depend on not only genus and species, but the individual animal as well.
What are your temperatures for your lq? When i had an lq it didnt do too much until i got it a heat lamp and then it started displaying this kind of behaviour.
 

brancsikia339

Arachnopeon
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Jun 11, 2013
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I actually have jordanensis but they are under a heat lamp, around 85° F. They are both very active, the female moreso as in she is always exploring. So far they haven't used their stingers defensively, only to kill their prey (which happened rapidly).
 

TheScorpionMan

Arachnoknight
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190
I actually have jordanensis but they are under a heat lamp, around 85° F. They are both very active, the female moreso as in she is always exploring. So far they haven't used their stingers defensively, only to kill their prey (which happened rapidly).
Sounds like a good setup. Forgot you were talking about your jordanensis (even tho it's your profile pic lol). But anywhere from 85-95 is where i kept my lqs and androctonus. They like it hot
 

JoshBC

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 23, 2016
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Funny how the 'deadliest' scorpion is a Hottentotta from India. Tamulus I believe. Please someone correct me if I'm wrong. I think in the real world, like Darkness mentioned, population density and access to medical care are everything.

I've never kept Leiurus Quinquestriatus, so couldn't comment on their behavior. I have an Androctonus Australis though, and he is by far the most aggressive scorpion I've ever kept. I've never put my hand within a foot of that thing lol.

As for drop for drop potency, I wonder where the Hottentotta Tamulus weighs in. Anyone know? I have a Hottentotta Judaicus and I believe they're like 8.00 on the LD50 table.
 

ArachnoDrew

Arachnoprince
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Funny how the 'deadliest' scorpion is a Hottentotta from India. Tamulus I believe. Please someone correct me if I'm wrong. I think in the real world, like Darkness mentioned, population density and access to medical care are everything.

I've never kept Leiurus Quinquestriatus, so couldn't comment on their behavior. I have an Androctonus Australis though, and he is by far the most aggressive scorpion I've ever kept. I've never put my hand within a foot of that thing lol.

As for drop for drop potency, I wonder where the Hottentotta Tamulus weighs in. Anyone know? I have a Hottentotta Judaicus and I believe they're like 8.00 on the LD50 table.
Both my Australis hectors are INSALNEY aggressive/defensive... and they are Sooooo fast. I agree anything less than a foot distance literally makes me sweat haha
 

brancsikia339

Arachnopeon
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Jun 11, 2013
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Hottentotta tamulus LD50 is 0.9 mg/kg, behind the majority of Androctonus species but at the forefront of the Hottentotta genus. They are, however, found in some of the most crowded parts of the world, living commonly in the urban areas of India that have no access to medical care; this makes them extremely hazardous. Though they don't match up in the drop for drop test, they manage to kill more people than any other scorpion because of the circumstances of where they're found
 
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