L. Hesperus?

BabaYaga

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 20, 2016
Messages
6
Fairly new to the T hobby (been in it for like? A year? I guess?) and was curious about L. Hesperus. They're really common in the wild in my state, but I feel like I don't know many people in the spider community who owns them.

Honestly, I think they're absolutely spectacular with their long graceful legs and contrasting patterns... but are they difficult to keep? Why are they seemingly so uncommon?

Just curious to know your guys' thoughts on them! Aesthetically they're A+ but I don't know a great deal about them as far as the exotic pet trade goes.
 

PanzoN88

Arachnodemon
Joined
Sep 15, 2014
Messages
693
The true spider subforum is the place to go for questions concerning Latrodectus and othe non tarantulas.
 

chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 27, 2010
Messages
2,059
They are super easy to keep - just pop one in a cup or bottle of some sort with a good lid and a few twigs to climb on, drop in a cricket every week or so, and you're all set.

The very first pet spider I ever kept was L. hesperus - she helped me get over a severe case of arachnophobia, just by watching her and learning about her. Watching her molt was somewhere between watching a ballet and a strip tease. They're also very aggressive feeders - and prone to learning a "feeding response" where they approach the opening of the container when it is opened for feeding. (So keep your fingers well out of the way, when dropping in prey!)

They are not terribly common as pets, but that may just be because they are so common in the wild - or because people who want pet spiders prefer something a little bigger and showier (or something they can handle) like a tarantula.
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
Joined
May 28, 2012
Messages
650
Stupidly easy. I love widows, and I especially love watching them hunt their prey. They are so fast and graceful.

They grow pretty quick, maturing in 9 months or less, and if mated, will give you eggsac after eggsac (which can be a pain if you don't WANT thousands of baby widows... but since they were native to where I lived, I'd just release the babies outside).
 

BabaYaga

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 20, 2016
Messages
6
The true spider subforum is the place to go for questions concerning Latrodectus and othe non tarantulas.
ah, that's a good point. Apologies!

They are super easy to keep - just pop one in a cup or bottle of some sort with a good lid and a few twigs to climb on, drop in a cricket every week or so, and you're all set.

The very first pet spider I ever kept was L. hesperus - she helped me get over a severe case of arachnophobia, just by watching her and learning about her. Watching her molt was somewhere between watching a ballet and a strip tease. They're also very aggressive feeders - and prone to learning a "feeding response" where they approach the opening of the container when it is opened for feeding. (So keep your fingers well out of the way, when dropping in prey!)

They are not terribly common as pets, but that may just be because they are so common in the wild - or because people who want pet spiders prefer something a little bigger and showier (or something they can handle) like a tarantula.
That makes sense... I appreciate the care advice! Maybe I'll pick up a couple one of these days. They really are super elegant, it would be nice to have a few in my collection. How long did yours live, if you don't mind my asking?

@Bugmom
Wow that is quick!
Hmmm... yup, might have to get one
(or a thousand)
 

chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 27, 2010
Messages
2,059
ah, that's a good point. Apologies!



That makes sense... I appreciate the care advice! Maybe I'll pick up a couple one of these days. They really are super elegant, it would be nice to have a few in my collection. How long did yours live, if you don't mind my asking?
It's hard to say how long they live, since most of the widows I've kept were wild-caught as adults so I don't know how old they were to begin with, but I've kept some for maybe a year or more.
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
Joined
May 28, 2012
Messages
650
They generally live about a year after they mature (at 6-9 months).
 
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