keeping pedes

Justin

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 8, 2003
Messages
126
i want to get a centipede of some sort soon but i would sleep better knowing that it COULD NOT get out. I have been to pets mart to look for cages and the only cages they had where the normal tanks for reptiles, the kind with the sealant that the pedes can klimb up. my question is, if you put a couple of locks on the tanks and the pede can klimb up to the lid, can it get out, do they get out by pushing the lid off or do they squeeze through between the lid and the tank? they did have some large critter keeper that looked impossible to escape through, even i had trouble getting the lid off. bu my problem with that is, you cant put a heating pad on the side because its plastic. what do all of you ue, for those of you who use the plain glass tanks for reptiles, how do yo prevnt the pede from getting out?
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
They can squeeze through surprisingly tight openings, and yes, they can sometimes pry lids off containers. The risk of the second possibility is reduced by using a taller cage. The pede usually can't get the leverage it needs if it cant touch the bottom and the top at the same time. Using a tall cage will also help prevent the pede from successfully making that mad dash for freedom when the lid is opened.

As you've already figured out, the sillicone bead in the corners of aquariums may be utilized to get the pede to the top. I've seen a variety of cages and tops in the pet trade, but doubt I'd feel really comfortable with any of them. It seems like there's always some gap somewhere. I've had small snakes escape out of plastic kritter keepers, so I wouldn't be surprised if peads could get out as well. I'm sure some keepers use them without problems, but I've learned the hard way not to take chances with big centipedes!

Smaller species, like feathertails and S. polymorpha, can be kept in large glass or plastic jars. Vent holes can be burned (if plastic) or drilled (if metal) through the lid. A screw on lid is pretty much escape proof, unless you make your holes too big! Also, make sure they're not clinging to the underside of the lid when you open it (shoeldn't be a problem in a tall jar).

For big scolopendra, my favorite cage is made from round polycarbonate food storage containers. Polycarbonate is crystal clear and incredably durable. I get them from a resturant supply store. They're kind of pricey, but the lid snaps down very tightly. The floor space of the large ones I use is equivelent to that of a 5-gallon aquarium...but round instead of rectangular. They are about 9" tall, but bigger sizes are available. You can also make cages from other storage containers, but most of those available at target, wal-matt etc. are not totally clear and do not look as nice. Sill, though, many will work. Just remember to carefully examine how the lid is attached.

Wade
 
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