Just a few little questions...

yrcomplacency

Arachnopeon
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Feb 22, 2003
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1. Anyone in Los Angeles with a female C. Cyaneopubescens interested in a 50/50 breeding split with my male? Mature molt and first sperm web about a month ago.

2. If thee temperature of thee room is low (70 ish) how does this affect growth and feeding? I just moved thee T's into my bedroom (thee new roommate doesnt want them in thee livingroom anymore) and it's a bit chilly.

Jenner
 

Henry Kane

Arachnoprince
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Jul 19, 2002
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Originally posted by yrcomplacency


If thee temperature of thee room is low (70 ish) how does this affect growth and feeding? I just moved thee T's into my bedroom (thee new roommate doesnt want them in thee livingroom anymore) and it's a bit chilly.

Jenner
Hi.
70ish is a bit cool I'd say. I don't think it'll kill them (depending on what sp. you keep though it could be unhealthy for them) but it will slow the T's metabolism which in turn will slow their feeding habits.
There are a few options as far as providing extra warmth for them. You can use a heat source such as a small heat pad. (designed for reptiles) You can put one near a side of your T's enclosure and monitor the temp, adjusting the distance between the side of your enclosure and the heat mat until you get the desired temperature. I would not recommend putting a heat mat under the enclosure. That may cause the T to dessicate very rapidly.

Hope this helps.

Atrax
 

LPacker79

ArachnoSpaz
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All of my T's are kept at room temperature (71 degrees here) and they're eating voraciously and growing well. According to The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, room temp is perfectly fine as long as it doesn't get below 70 degrees.

Leanne
 

Henry Kane

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Yeah, like I said, as far as most species are concerned it wont kill them. There are a few species however, for which low 70's may be unhealthy.
70ish is also pretty generalized. It could mean 70-73 or so or it could mean 68-70. When you get down in the 70 range you're cutting it a bit close to the line of what may not be the best temps.
My invert room is kept room temp also...although room temp in there is an average of 75-79 degrees. The term "room temp" is also pretty generalized. Some folk's room temp can be 60 degrees which obviously is a bit chilly for inverts.
Your best bet is to just simply determine the average climate the particular T is used to based on it's geographical origin and try to get as close to that as possible. At least in my opinion.

Atrax
 

Henry Kane

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Originally posted by LPacker79
All According to The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, room temp is perfectly fine as long as it doesn't get below 70 degrees.
By the way, I'm glad to see you did your homework. I've read TKG at least 4 times. (Can't wait to meet the Schultzes in person at the ATS this year) I do wish they'd publish an updated version though. Nothing against the book. I personally believe it's still the best published source of T info available. Still, so much more has been learned since the second edition. *rambling...and off topic*

See ya. :)

Atrax
 

LPacker79

ArachnoSpaz
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By the way, I'm glad to see you did your homework. I've read TKG at least 4 times. (Can't wait to meet the Schultzes in person at the ATS this year) I do wish they'd publish an updated version though. Nothing against the book. I personally believe it's still the best published source of T info available. Still, so much more has been learned since the second edition.
I try to learn as much as I can. Actually, when I received my first tarantula I knew nothing about them. My brother came home drunk one night right before Thanksgiving of 2002 with a G. rosea that a friend had given him. When he sobered up he remembered that he's scared of spiders and he can't even keep a goldfish alive. The T then became mine and I was fascinated. Bought my 2nd in December, 6 in January, and just got a new A. avicularia friday...I'm hooked!
I refer to the TKG frequently, and it's my bible. I also wish they'd publish an updated version. The scientific names have changed so much, especially G. rosea. I wish I could go to the ATS conference.....alas that's too far from Michigan.
Just a question, how do you go about heating just one room in your house? I would like to do this someday but have always wondered how it was done. I know some people use space heaters, but I'd be terrified of fires....

Leanne
 

Henry Kane

Arachnoprince
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Hi again Leanne.
Actually I'm very lucky to have a bug room in which the heat vent is first in line from the furnace. I have a finished basement with 2 rooms down there. Aside from those 2 rooms there is a utility room with the washer, dryer, water heater and furnace. The heat duct from the furnace runs past the bug room first. Plus with the other appliances down there, it's actually hard not to keep it warm down there.

See ya. :)

Atrax
 

yrcomplacency

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
3
Re: Re: Just a few little questions...

Thee heater in this room doesn't work at all, so I keep those tall glass religious candles lit for warmth. Since thee T's have moved in here, they each have been placed in rather close proximity to a candle each, which seems to be working, but I cannot keep them lit 24/7 due to risk of fire.

Thee C. Cyaneopubescens has a small snake heat rock, which he adores. Thee A. Seemani is atop of thee C. Cyaneopubescens, both of which are atop thee python cage, which radiates heat. Thee A. Avicularia is next to my computer monitor and a candle, thee C.Fasciatum thee same, thee H. Lividum is next to a candle as well. They all get thee recomended humidity.

So far nobody seems to have suffered any, but the eating has definately slowed down. Thee C. Cyaneopubescens hasnt eaten since his maturing molt come to think of it.
 

Henry Kane

Arachnoprince
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Your cyanopubescens going off food may be due to the cooler temps since it is native to Vevezuelan scrublands. Their native climate is very warm and dry.
On the other hand, if it's a mature male, it's not uncommon for one to just not be too interested in food. He's got his mind on other things...like finding a female.

My advice would be for you to invest in a portable heater. You can usually find them at Home Depot or Wal-Mart, Target or someplace like that. I've seen them in the 30.00 range. Not a bad investment IMO. Just remember not to leave it running when you're not around.

Atrax
 
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