Jumping Spider with Green Chelicerae

Big Mike

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Speaking of Jumping Spiders. I have found several large jumpers in here in Central California that look like P. Audax except they have red or orange markings on the abdomen. They are about 3/4 in. with green chelicerae. After looking at the pictures posted in this thread (one with white markings, one with yellow) I am wondering if my jumpers are just a color variant of this species? I would appreciate any info or ideas you may have.

Mike
 

Alex S.

Arachnolord
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Yeah, I have also seen several specimens with different color variations and most likely they are morphs.

Alex S.
 

atavuss

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Originally posted by Big Mike
Speaking of Jumping Spiders. I have found several large jumpers in here in Central California that look like P. Audax except they have red or orange markings on the abdomen. They are about 3/4 in. with green chelicerae. After looking at the pictures posted in this thread (one with white markings, one with yellow) I am wondering if my jumpers are just a color variant of this species? I would appreciate any info or ideas you may have.

Mike
central california! a neighbor! I live in Stockton.
Ed
 

Wade

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Originally posted by Big Mike
It is the November 1996 issue with a picture of Planet Earth from the Space Shuttle. Definitely a must for anyone interested in Jumping Spiders, or spider inteligence.

Mike
Mike-

Thanks for that, I'll have to track it down. Do you remember who wrote the article? I bet it was Mark Moffett, he's a photographer for National Geographic and he was the one that gave the talk I saw!

Alex-

Thanks for coming up with the name! Portia is definately the one I was talking about.

Wade
 

Big Mike

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The article was written by Robert R. Jackson. He is associate professor of zoology at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. All of the photographs were taken by Mark W. Moffet. You must get your hands on this issue!

Mike
 

Alex S.

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Portia

No problem Wade, hope you get your hands on that article. They are just incredible spiders!!

Alex S.
 

Wade

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Thanks again, Mike

Does it have the picture of Portia stalking annother species of jumper? Moffet showed this one increadible slide of the prey spider actualy trying to hide under the shade cast by the looming Portia!

Wade
 

Big Mike

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The article is primarily all about Portia hunting and killing other spiders. There are about 10 pictures of Portia getting ready to attack, as well as sequences of attacks. Im not quite sure about the exact picture you are speaking of though. Did you actually see this slide show in person? I would have asked a million questions afterward! I hope you are able to win one of those issues on ebay.

Mike
 

Wade

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Moffet was the keynote speaker at the 2000 Sonoran Arthropod Studies Institute Invertebrates In Captivity Conference, where he presented the talk. He's an absolutly amazing photographer. He described Portia's method for stalking other jumpers. It follows them and stays directly behind the spider, in the "blind spot". If the jumper turns around, Portia freezes in place. Since Portia looks like a clump of lichen, the intended prey fails to recognize it as a threat, and continues on it's way. Portia continues to creep and freeze until it is virtually on top of the other spider. The photo showed Portia rearing up, but frozen in place, while it's intended victim attempts to hide under it!

The stuff about Portia was just part of his talk, he touched on and showed slides of a wide array of facinating inverts. He also took the pictures for Richard Coniff's article on tarantulas from the September 1996 issue of National Geographic.

Wade
 

Big Mike

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I am thinking about going to SASI next year. How was the conference as a whole? Were you able to do much colecting? If so, what did you find? Were there very many vendors? Give me some examples if possible. I want to go, but only if it is worth the trip.

Thanks!!!

Mike
 

Wade

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The SASI conference is awsome. A big part of that is the collecting. I don't know where you live, but I'm on the east coast, so the collecting in southern Arizona is mind blowing for me. Participants are issued a collecting permit for the Coronodo National Forest, which covers most of the wild areas in southern AZ.

I've been the past 4 years, but may not be able to attend next year :( . Every year, I can count on collecting tarantulas (Mostly A. chalcodes) scorpions (V. spinigerus, C. exilcauda,and a few others. Hadrurus is in the area, but I've never found any myself) Solifugids, vinegaroons (if you know where to go) Centipedes (lots of S. polymorpha and the occasional S. heros), lots of fantastic insects such as ox beetles, giant water bugs, sunburst diving beetles...it goes on and on. It's held during Monsoon season, when arthropod activity is at it highest.

Then there's the conference itself, top notch paper sessions plus workshops and exciting field collecting trips. Most of it is aimed at the professional, either entomologists or museum and zoo personel as well as school teachers. It takes place at a very nice resort hotel!

There's usually one or two vendors selling live inverts, this past year it was Hitari Invertebrates and Wee Beasties.

The only downside is that it's a bit pricey if you're paying your own way (most atendees work for zoos or museums and are sent there on the company dime). Although the hotel gives a discount for the conference, it's still a little steep, and it's probably at least a good 35 miles from the nearest alternative. This is the reason that I probably won't be going this year.

All in all, I'd say it's well worth it, especially if you've never collected in the Sonoran. It's truly awsome!

Wade
 

Big Mike

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I am really looking forward to going. I tried to get prices off of thier website, but my PDF reader isnt working. Can you fill me in on the fees?

Thanks!

Mike
 

Wade

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It's something like $180 (probably not exact) for registration, with extra fees for field trips and workshops. They do give a great discount if you present a paper or workshop. The basic registration includes at least 2 really good meals, an icebreaker cookout and a banquet at the end.

If you can swing it, you should go. It's a great time.

There's also the ATS conference, which is much, much, much cheaper. There's also more live animals offered for sale there as well.

Wade
 
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