Is there any cure if fungus is growing on a spider?

luna

Arachnoknight
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Nov 5, 2005
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178
I am really worried about my Lasiodora parahybana. Two days ago she looked beautiful; even earlier today.

Last night, I noticed that the hide / deep cave I built in her new tank has a light growth of a pale green mold on some spots at the top. The cave was a piece of prepared wood I bought at a pet store so I thought it would be cage safe. She hasn’t gone in there for days so I hoped she didn’t come in contact with it and that like so many molds, it would go away. I know some run out of control quickly but this didn’t look like it was going to do that. I thought it might be my imagination because I saw the mold but her color looked a little off under the direct beam of a flashlight.

Today when I looked in sunlight her color seemed fine. She has been somewhat active, moving to various locations and spent some time grooming herself.

I always check the T's one last time before bed. Tonight, it does look worse to me. I really hope I am being paranoid but I don't think so now... I do think the mold may be growing on her. If it is, do any of you know of any treatment that will kill the mold but not the spider? From what I know of fungus, by the time you see the fruiting bodies (fuzzy stuff) a lot of hyphae must be present and growing through the food source. To me that seems like she is already a goner. I wanted to write in case any of you have a miracle, and then I am going to go and remove her from the tank… its all I can think of to do for tonight.

I'm ready to cry... she's just sitting there and I am thinking about her being covered in fuzz tomorrow when I wake up... if I manage to sleep.

I hope one of you has a cure,

Cheri
 

luna

Arachnoknight
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Nov 5, 2005
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178
Ok... Priscilla is out of her tank and in a medium critter keeper.

I hope it is all my imagination. She sure can move! Got to chase her around the bathtub a bit. From some angles she still looks like a beautiful black velvet under longer red hairs. Other angles there is that blush of a greyish tinge that has me worried. I only see it in the right lightening at the right angle.

I guess I needed to change the substrate anyway and now I can observe her more closely so I guess she is stuck in confinement until this is settled.

If it really is a fungus though, I would think it should be much more obvious tomorrow.

If she is moldy tomorrow, I'd try anything you have been sucessful with, and I guess it would even be worth experimenting a bit. I love this girl.

Thanks,

Cheri
 

harrypei

Arachnoknight
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Oct 30, 2006
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289
sucks to hear that...it's pretty rare that you see visible fungus growing on a spider. i've had moldy spots in my enclosures from time to time, i just clean out the substrate and make sure i don't make it any more moist in the hear future...are you sure you are not just seeing things?
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
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Jul 22, 2006
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569
Salt water (I use sea salt) and a Q-tip should take care of it. I have never actually used it on a T but when I have mold pop up on decor that’s how I take care of it. Hope it all works out. Keep us updated.


Steph
 

Varden

Arachnodemon
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May 22, 2005
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704
Some substrate fungus can grow and quickly on both Ts and in the enclosure, particularly on peat moss. I had a rescue T that came completely covered with white fuzz. Yes, you can get it off but it'll take dedication.

Put the T in as small an enclosure as possible, like twice the T's length and width, but no bigger, because you're going to be changing it out frequently over the next few weeks.

First, put the T on a paper towel (I would do this inside an otherwise empty enclosure, with a lid) and--don't flame me for saying this--gently spritz down the T. It'll hate you for it, but you need to get as much of the spores off the T as possible. When the T stops running around, using a paintbrush, very gently wipe the it down, rinsing the brush after every stroke. Again, you want to get as much of the stuff off the T as possible.

Now, put it into the small container with the brand new substrate. Keep the substrate bone dry with a water dish or use a square of wet paper towel for a sling. You are going to change this substrate daily for the next two weeks and in between substrate changes, you will put the T on a paper towel and repeat the spritzing and brushing until you don't see any more mold on the T.

After two weeks of this, you can put the T back into it's normal but thoroughly cleaned enclosure. Keep a sharp eye on the substrate. At the slightest hint of mold, change the substrate again and again and again. Eventually, you'll get all the spores off the T and it'll be okay again. Hopefully, the mold isn't in the booklungs.
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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Feb 13, 2006
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8,662
Mold hates to be dry. Dry out everything. Take the T and put it just in a bare container, no nothing and let it dry out. When its gone place her in a clean container new substrate.
 

Stan Schultz

Arachnoprince
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Jul 16, 2004
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sucks to hear that...it's pretty rare that you see visible fungus growing on a spider. i've had moldy spots in my enclosures from time to time, i just clean out the substrate and make sure i don't make it any more moist in the hear future...are you sure you are not just seeing things?
I agree. Fungus infections on tarantulas are extremely rare and generally only found on those tarantulas that are kept in perpetually damp cages. (Insert "Don't keep your tarantulas in damp cages" rant.) (Insert "Don't mist your tarantulas" rant.)

In a general sort of way, any of the fungi that you can see in a cage are probably harmless to the tarantula. Remember that these things evolved living in dirt, grew up living in dirt, still live in dirt and will continue to live in dirt until they go extinct (for whatever reason). That dirt is *NOT* sterile. Among other things it harbors a lot more kinds of fungi than you can guess, trust me. And the overwhelmingly vast majority of tarantulas do just fine anyway.

If you can see OBVIOUS, small, gray or white, fuzzy patches, especially at the joints between its body or leg plates, you should get back to us. If you can see areas of its body surface that appear dry, but have a pebbly, orange peel appearance and on which the bristles have fallen off, get back to us. (*NOT* on the top, rear of the abdomen where the urticating bristles were brushed off!) Otherwise forget it.

Brazilian salmons are very hardy creatures. By the time it's reached a 2 " leg span you can easily acclimatize it to a bone dry cage as long as you're sure to always supply a water dish with fresh water (and a rock). Take care of them the same way you would care for a curlyhair or even a Chilean rose, except that you need to feed them everything they'll eat (except maybe the cat!) as they grow so they'll reach their full potential for size.

Enjoy your tarantulas!
 

Alice

Arachnoangel
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Sep 29, 2006
Messages
976
this worked for me:

put her in a kk with a dry piece of paper towel as substrate and offer her water in a dish. keep her dry.

get a fungus cream for human skin (the mild one you get without a receipt) and brush it on with a q-tip twice a day in a THIN layer. that saved my c. spec. blue's life.
 
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