Is 72 deg F OK for tropicals

k2power

Arachnoknight
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Sep 26, 2010
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I have an assortment of species
2 Avicularias
H. gigas
L. parahybana
B. smithi
B. emilia

My question is : Will 72 deg F cause feeding problems or other problems for these species over the winter. I had not planned on supplemental heating the room they are in but cold get the people heating pads from Walmart that have adjustable temps. My L. parahybana has been off feed for about a month (maybe premolt) and the B. emilia is new and kinda skinny and also off feed. The H. gigas and B. smithi eat all the time and the Avics occasionally. I know warmer temps will be beneficial but not popular with the "boss". Can I get away with this until spring with no ill consequences. How many of you keep yours in the lower 70s?
 

Durandal

Arachnosquire
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I keep all of mine in the low 70s and they are thriving.
Some of them get lethargic when it goes down to the high 60s during winter, but I don't think there's anything wrong with that.
 

Fran

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I keep all of mine in the low 70s and they are thriving.
Some of them get lethargic when it goes down to the high 60s during winter, but I don't think there's anything wrong with that.
Considering that where those t's come from temps are higher than that...Well, They wont die on the spot, but in the long run it probably affect their behavior,feeding patterns and growth for sure.

Its been said many times, the T wont yell at you "Im cold!" or "Im not ok"..So "I have kept them at 68F and nothing happens " is NOT an accurate info in the least.
 

Shell

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I actually just moved all of mine from our bedroom to a secure spot in the living room for the winter. We don't turn the heat on in our room and its been at about 72 for a bit now. All of mine have been more inactive than normal, staying in hides or burrows etc. Also, they have been much more slow to take food. While they all seemed "fine," I just didn't feel comfortable leaving them at those temps for the next few months. Within 10 mins of coming out into a warmer room, most of them were out and somewhat active.

While they may be "ok" at lower temps for longer periods of time, I just feel better keeping them at temps I know are better suited for them.
 

Bazzgazm

Arachnoknight
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I keep all of mine (including a "T. sp burgundy") at 75day, 70 night.. no problems.

in fact, the only thing that gets a warm spot i own is my carpet python who gets a 10hr heat lamp from 10pm-8am because of the nighttime drop in the apartment (we like it cold when we sleep)

i'm about to get a house and i'll set them up a room around the same temp and possibly a small warmspot in the room for ease.
 

Durandal

Arachnosquire
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So "I have kept them at 68F and nothing happens " is NOT an accurate info in the least.
Okay Fran, but no one was saying that. Actually I said the opposite of that. It's obvious that the temperature affects them. No one has disputed that, and I don't think it's even the OP's point.

I've been keeping them at a range where it isn't costing me much more (than $0) but they are still regularly feeding, molting and building to my satisfaction. Is there something about that you disapprove of?
 

LirvA

Arachnosquire
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are the ~70 degree temps ok for Brachys? OP listed a couple but thread title is tropical ...
 

Fran

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Okay Fran, but no one was saying that. Actually I said the opposite of that. It's obvious that the temperature affects them. No one has disputed that, and I don't think it's even the OP's point.

I've been keeping them at a range where it isn't costing me much more (than $0) but they are still regularly feeding, molting and building to my satisfaction. Is there something about that you disapprove of?
Yes. The fact that, as stated before, is a proven fact that at lower temps feeding patterns are affected, behavioral patterns are affected and growing rates are affected.

(Does that fit your "satisfaction"? Great, Im sure it does.)

Based on those patterns, how badly are they affected by that?How much would longer periods of low temps will determen life span or quality of life? We dont know yet.
But what we do know is that saying "they are fine" is NOT accurate.

What we know is that, again, the fact that they live DOES NOT MEAN they are thriving, or fine, or ok...Or with no problems.
As far as we know, they are living.
 
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azgbb

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Okay Fran, but no one was saying that. Actually I said the opposite of that. It's obvious that the temperature affects them. No one has disputed that, and I don't think it's even the OP's point.

I've been keeping them at a range where it isn't costing me much more (than $0) but they are still regularly feeding, molting and building to my satisfaction. Is there something about that you disapprove of?
I think this is what Fran was trying tto say.

Might be ok with you and seem normal, but the spiders might not be comfortable with it.
 

aquaArachnid

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All the info I've read has said to keep tropic species in the 70's.. My apartment stays in the low 70's and both my T's seem to be fine
 

Arachnos482

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Well i have a b.vagans, and we had a cold front move threw here a few days ago, the temp dropped to about 70, and you could see a definite change in the t's movement and feeding, warmed back up to 90 and she's back to her old self...
 

Poxicator

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It amazes me when people talk of temperatures (and humidity), they quote them as fixed figures and yet we all experience fluctuations, from different locations, different seasons, different times of the day and night. We're not adept at such changes but according to Stanley Schultz tarantula certainly are. His theory is if the temperatures in your home are comfortable enough to wear a T-shirt it'll be fine for your inverts. Surely we don't think the temperatures on this planet have been the same since the dinosaurs ruled the earth?
 

Fran

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It amazes me when people talk of temperatures (and humidity), they quote them as fixed figures and yet we all experience fluctuations, from different locations, different seasons, different times of the day and night. We're not adept at such changes but according to Stanley Schultz tarantula certainly are. His theory is if the temperatures in your home are comfortable enough to wear a T-shirt it'll be fine for your inverts. Surely we don't think the temperatures on this planet have been the same since the dinosaurs ruled the earth?


As a Geographist specialized on climatology, and more importantly specially interested on the tropics and the Venezuelan Jungle, where a huge range of theraphosids come from (similar conditions apply to other rainforests) The fact is that the temperatures are within a very close range.

Althought in some parts raining seasons ocurr, in the south american jungle te temps stay warm all year round. The humidity stays on the 90's% all year round.

So again, if you keep your house in the mid 60's and the enclosure is dry, certain species will NOT be fine.
 

Poxicator

Arachnobaron
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H. gigas - Cameroon
http://www.climatetemp.info/cameroon/
The highest monthly average high temperature is 29 °C (84 °F) in January, February, March, April.
The lowest monthly average low temperature is 18 °C (64 °F) in August, October.

B. emelia (using Los Mochis as an example)
http://www.holidaycheck.com/climate-wetter_Los+Mochis-ebene_oid-id_5949.html
4 day weather guide:
Tue: min. 64° F | max. 87° F
Wed: min. 60° F | max. 89° F
Thu: min. 60° F | max. 87° F
Fri: min. 62° F | max. 86° F

L. parahybana
http://www.arachnophiles.com/Lasiodora-Sp-.php
"native habitat range from 77-88 degrees during the day and 70-75 degrees at night"
http://www.climate-charts.com/Locations/b/BZ82795.php

I'm not arguing that low temperatures will not affect the Ts, I think it will have an impact in the way you mention, but I don't believe it to be such that it will impact on its health. If we consider some of these species, notably H. gigas, live in deep burrows and are more active (and feeding) at night then despite the higher figures quoted they are more likely to be seen during the cooler temperatures.

For my own experience of visiting Thailand and Sri Lanka I found temperatures fluctuated during the day and plummeted at night time in the rainforest. Infact the areas where Highland P. subfusca are found is actually quite cold and is prone to freezing temperatures, we certainly required warm clothing whilst we were up there and we didnt go to the heights where they can still be found.

Andrew Smith studied Brachypelma genus and quotes temperatures outside and inside their burrows. I have his video lying around, definitely worth another look and I'll see if I can quote some of these figures.

To my mind this is the beauty of tarantula, they are very adaptable, they don't show obvious signs of suffering from temperatures in the late 60s/early 70s. We can provide a variety of enclosures, we can differ in our set-ups and care and yet we might all show success. Accurately creating the optimum temperatures IMO is more important if we decide to breed.
 

Fran

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L. parahybana
http://www.arachnophiles.com/Lasiodora-Sp-.php
"native habitat range from 77-88 degrees during the day and 70-75 degrees at night"
http://www.climate-charts.com/Locations/b/BZ82795.php
.


Thats a somewhat good example. Although Parahibana, wich is originally mainly from the Paraiba region, in Brazil, shows temps on the high 70's to high 80's.
At night, doesnt drop much but it feels colder because of the foggy early mornings.

In Estado amazonas, Venezuela, temps will be in the same mid/up 80's and with the humidity the sensation is quite axfixiating.

Now put a rainforest T in the 60's on a dry tank and it wont live long, wont behave "normally" , wont grow at a regular rates...

Are temps important?-Yes, they are.
 

Waxen

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I think everybody in the thread so far is in agreement that temperature is important, but to what extent is the question. Having not kept tarantulas in 4 years I don't feel comfortable weighing in on this topic. My question is for the people who keep a large collection of species from many different regions. How do you address the temperature and humidity concerns of so many different tarantulas in what I assume is one large room? The temperature it probably set one agreeable range for all the T's. Is humidity individually controlled by misting individual cages? Is this done daily/weekly? Monitored how?

Wow. That turned into more questions that I thought. I'm planning on getting back into the hobby in the near future and I figured I'd get some of these on topic questions answered by somebody with vastly more experience than me. I hope I'm not putting Fran on the spot but I respect his opinion and what he brings to this hobby.
 

Fran

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I hope I'm not putting Fran on the spot but I respect his opinion and what he brings to this hobby.
Thanks for your words. I really appreciate it.

Thats a good question, and the answer in my opinion is simple...When your collection has a huge diversity of specie, old and new world...Obviously,unless you spend the money on heating pannels for every single cage or group of cages-which it could get really expensive,you would have to pick a general temp.

The humidity is easier to achieve individually by allowing greater ventilation-drier enclosure.

In my personal case I keep South American terrestrials, focusing on teraphosa, so its not a problem at all.
 

Waxen

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It seems like a good solution to both questions, Fran. When I was actively in the hobby, my interests were diverse. To be able to focus on a single genus would be divine. I'll certainly commit your suggestions to memory for future use when I am able to start collecting anew.
 

Poxicator

Arachnobaron
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I have an ambient temperature of 75F in my tarantula room, the heat supplied by an oil filled radiator. Its the hottest room in the house as its my loft room, double insulated so temperatures can get warmer during the winter. The radiator is only used during the winter months or when there's multiple breeding projects. Anything really close to the radiator receives temperatures above this and anything requiring higher temperatures for breeding purposes is supplemented with a heatmat.
I don't measure humidity, I just maintain a level of moisture appropriate to the species and enclosure. The room has a heat gradient so anything requiring lower temps eg. P. subfusca, G. rosea will be furthest away from the heat source.

I keep a range of species from NW and OW but I find myself moving away from terrestrials (with the exception of GBB - I have about 25 of them and some favourites) to arboreals. I keep quite a few pokies.
 

k2power

Arachnoknight
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I am trying to avoid the oil radiator in the room. the smell cant be good and it does raise the heating bill substantially. I will try for 72-73 in the upstairs if I can keep my wife from turning it down. After being gone for a week I bet it is back down in time for the L. parahybana molt probably. It will be interesting to see how it feeds after the molt and see if temp seems to affect its desire to feed. Crickets were loved in early september.
 
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