Info on P tigrinawesseli

Scorpionking20

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I just got a P tigrinawesseli sling and haven't heard much of it. Seeing how little is stated about these guys on the forum search, I thought I'd ask what makes them unique among pokies. Any special color or behavioral differences compared to other pokies? Size? Thanks for any information you can share to make sure I take care of this cute little sling the right way, and get to enjoy it as well!
 

Protectyaaaneck

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I'd keep them like any other poecilotheria and you'll be fine. I wouldn't say there are any special requirements needed for them. Feed and water and you should be good. I don't think they've been bred successfully in the U.S. yet. They also have 3 nymph stages. :)
 

Scorpionking20

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I'd keep them like any other poecilotheria and you'll be fine. I wouldn't say there are any special requirements needed for them. Feed and water and you should be good. I don't think they've been bred successfully in the U.S. yet. They also have 3 nymph stages. :)
I'm interested in the "3 nympth stages." What is that? Sorry for my ignorance.
 

Ictinike

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Umm, instead of being ready at 2nd instar they aren't ready until 3rd instar. This goes for p. miranda, p. formosa and p. metallica also.
Meaning, and correct me if I'm wrong Protect, they don't utilize all of their embryonic reserves and truly begin eating our provided solid food as other 1st instars.
 

Protectyaaaneck

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Meaning, and correct me if I'm wrong Protect, they don't utilize all of their embryonic reserves and truly begin eating our provided solid food as other 1st instars.
Correct(but I think you mean 2nd instars). They won't start feeding until they've reached 3rd instar. I could be wrong as I haven't experienced this firsthand but I'm pretty sure that's the case based on what I've read.

Pretty sure M. balfouri is another example of a multi-nymphal sp.
 

TarantulaHomes

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I think the key to keeping any species is to recreate the conditions in their native habitat as close as possible.

Here's a chart I created from the past weather observations

 
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Scorpionking20

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Wow. Interesting information guys. I was hoping to get some more information on how they differ from other pokies (3rd nymph stage info was great!)

Looking at pictures they look like a fuzzy regalis. Are they the typical 6/7" spider?
 

Poxicator

Arachnobaron
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Sorry, don't mean to be pedantic but the instars are only recorded once they reach sling stage. The nymph stage isnt recorded as instars (I'm sure it has another name).
 

Zoltan

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Sorry, don't mean to be pedantic but the instars are only recorded once they reach sling stage. The nymph stage isnt recorded as instars (I'm sure it has another name).
Me neither, but technically nymph is not a correct term to use when talking about spiders (especially not when combined with "instar"), at least I haven't really seen any hobby person use the term where it "could" / "should" be used and use it consistently. The development stages look like this: embryo -> postembryo -> 1st instar (not a "spiderling") -> 2nd instar ("spiderling" for most tarantulas species) -> 3rd instar -> etc.
 

xhexdx

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My P. foromsa slings were eating at 2i, unless I missed something between when she laid and when I pulled.
 

Poxicator

Arachnobaron
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Hi Zoltan
I agree, embryo -> postembryo is a more accurate description. But I find in the UK many people refer to this as the nymph 1 and nymph 2 stage (or N1 & N2). The term "nymph" was first coined for tarantula as "quiescent nymph" then "nymph" by Ewing (1918).
 

dianedfisher

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My P. foromsa slings were eating at 2i, unless I missed something between when she laid and when I pulled.
Could be you missed that quick molt into 3rd Instar because those four specific species of Poecilotheria are what I have in my records as well. I don't breed Grammostola, but I think there are a few of them who require an additional molt before feeding as well.
Diane
 

Zoltan

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Hi Zoltan
I agree, embryo -> postembryo is a more accurate description. But I find in the UK many people refer to this as the nymph 1 and nymph 2 stage (or N1 & N2). The term "nymph" was first coined for tarantula as "quiescent nymph" then "nymph" by Ewing (1918).
I think that people don't refer to the embryo stage as "nymph", that would be strange. The embryo -> postembryo -> first instar terminology is Downes' (1987). Ewing referred to the stages as egg -> first, or quiescent nymph -> second nymph.
Sorry, don't mean to be pedantic but the instars are only recorded once they reach sling stage. The nymph stage isnt recorded as instars (I'm sure it has another name).
What this means to me is that you think the developmental stages look like this (maybe I disinterpreted): 1st nymph -> 2nd nymph -> 1st instar -> 2nd instar etc.? Instar means a developmental stage between molts. In other words, when the spider first molts, it enters 1st instar (this is the stage after the postembryo period). Downes' 1st instar is equivalent to Ewing's 2nd nymph. But Ewing also refers to later developmenal stages as numbered nymphs (3rd nymph, 4th nymph etc.) up to adult. (Ewing didn't use this term with regard to tarantulas. His 1918 article is about Theridion tepidariorum [=Parasteatoda tepidariorum]).

References:
Ewing, H. E. 1918. The life and behavior of the house spider. Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science 25: 177-204.
Downes, M. F. 1987. A proposal for standardization of the terms used to describe early development of spiders, based on a study of Theridion rufipes Lucas (Araneae: Theridiidae). Bulletin of the British Arachnological Society 7 (6): 187-193.
 

Poxicator

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More interesting stuff. All great for learning.
I also found this from R G Breene: http://www.atshq.org/Development.pdf
Its obvious there's a variety of ways to describe these early stages.
What was interesting about Breene's paper is the variation in the amount of moults, I hadn't realised as I believed after the 7th moult they'd reach sub-adult.

If you do a search on the variety of forums you read you'll find the term nymph used quite a lot. T-store, AB, AP, BTS, ATSHQ, even Mikhail F. Bagaturov uses the term :)
 

Zoltan

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More interesting stuff. All great for learning.
I also found this from R G Breene: http://www.atshq.org/Development.pdf
Its obvious there's a variety of ways to describe these early stages.
What was interesting about Breene's paper is the variation in the amount of moults, I hadn't realised as I believed after the 7th moult they'd reach sub-adult.

If you do a search on the variety of forums you read you'll find the term nymph used quite a lot. T-store, AB, AP, BTS, ATSHQ, even Mikhail F. Bagaturov uses the term :)
I know RGB's PDF well, he sides with Downes' terminology. Before listing the names of the stages, he discusses briefly the different terminologies and also notes: "In general, larva is a term usually reserved by entomologists to describe the immature stages of an insect with complete metamorphosis (e.g. the caterpillar of a butterfly or moth, the grub of a beetle); a nymph refers to many terrestrial immatures of an insect with incomplete metamorphosis (e. g. stink bugs, leafhoppers)."

I also often see A. seemanni spelled with a single n, embolus used wrongly instead of palpal bulb, that doesn't make them right.

I don't mean to diss Mikhail's site, because it's a great resource of information about tarantulas and I have used it a lot myself, but it's not perfect. Even if we don't count the developmental stage terms, I know of at least two errors in the taxonomic part. Also, there are no references to which terminology he's using.
 
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JimM

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I think the key to keeping any species is to recreate the conditions in their native habitat as close as possible.
IMHO, empirical data really hasn't shown us that.
In several decades of keeping T's, I haven't found it necessary to replicate any natural habitats. They're hardy, forgiving creatures for the most part and it's frankly impossible to replicate 4 seasons in an Indian forest in one enclosure, and 4 seasons in a Mexican dessert in the next.

Some species may demonstrate that more attention needs to be payed to a cooling off period, or a warming period which may induce breeding, or more humidity, higher temps, etc but this is far and away different however from replicating a native habitat.

All that being said, paying attention to patterns where they come from, and assimilating this into your husbandry practices to a practical extent can't hurt.
 
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