ICU myth?

mack1855

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Just wondering about this icu thing that seems to be the first thing that newish T owners
do when their T,s don't seem to be doing well.
It seems a lot of you veteran keepers never mention doing this.And a few of you have
said "stop doing that".

There is a post on T.Chat about a G.rosea not doing well,and the op states moving the
T to and out of icu,a least twice.Seems to me to be the wrong thing to be doing.Basic
husbandry is most likely the issue?.Isnt moving a G.rosea to a damp icu about the last
thing this T needs?Does the icu thing need to stop?
 

Venom1080

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i use ICUs for spiders that like damp conditions and arent doing great. i had a N. incei sling molt out of DKS in one.
theyre just not good for arid species that dont like the extra humidity.
 

mack1855

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i use ICUs for spiders that like damp conditions and arent doing great. i had a N. incei sling molt out of DKS in one.
theyre just not good for arid species that dont like the extra humidity.
So was the icu used because the original enclosure was difficult to keep moist enough?Or used for you to
keep a closer eye on your N.incei.Or other reasons you went with the icu?
 

Andrea82

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i think the term ICU conveys a different message when it comes to tarantula, than when it is used for humans. For humans, it is a place to go to when something is seriously wrong, and to prevent further damage for every illness, injury, and for every human. There is a reasonable chance the human survives.
An ICU for T's is more like a last resort option, and not recommended for a lot of species, and most spiders don't make it, in spite of the ICU, or, in some cases, because of an ICU.
It is not a place for a T to recover, like it is for humans. A T recovers best when in its own enclosure.
 

mack1855

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A T recovers best when in its own enclosure.
That's what I'm thinking also.Even with a T that required higher moisture levels,i cant see moving it to
a icu enclosure,im thinking more stress cant be helpful.It either gets better,or dies.

Even a bad shipment,like a delayed delivery time,i would think putting it in a proper enclosure,with increased
humidity,however you would go about that,and slightly increase the temps,would be better that an icu enclosure.

I'm just sitting here on a cold day,on AB again,and just thinking out load.I meant thinking out loud,Geezzzo_O
 

viper69

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Just wondering about this icu thing that seems to be the first thing that newish T owners
do when their T,s don't seem to be doing well.
It seems a lot of you veteran keepers never mention doing this.And a few of you have
said "stop doing that".

There is a post on T.Chat about a G.rosea not doing well,and the op states moving the
T to and out of icu,a least twice.Seems to me to be the wrong thing to be doing.Basic
husbandry is most likely the issue?.Isnt moving a G.rosea to a damp icu about the last
thing this T needs?Does the icu thing need to stop?

I've used ICUs when I was new to Ts. I learned about them here. However over time I also realize that an ICU is not necessarily a solution for all species. Increased humidity is not welcomed by some species, like G. rosea.

Also, what is an ICU? To me it implies that something in the tank is affecting the T, that's never been my case. So I feel no need to move my T that is already in distress.
 

mistertim

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I think ICUs (as they are generally known) are really only helpful for a very dehydrated tarantula. That or a species that already likes damp conditions but has an issue with it's enclosure. But in that case it is more of a "temp housing" thing than an ICU.
 

mack1855

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I think ICUs (as they are generally known) are really only helpful for a very dehydrated tarantula. That or a species that already likes damp conditions but has an issue with it's enclosure. But in that case it is more of a "temp housing" thing than an ICU.
But wouldn't a dehydrated T need to drink,as opposed to sitting or being in a moist environment?How does the T receive hydration
through a wet substrate?I can see increasing moisture,or humidity,for molting issues.But for hydration,i don't see it helping.
If a T wont take water from a dish,or on the sides of the enclosure,sticking it in a wet container isn't likely to help the cause.
 

viper69

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But wouldn't a dehydrated T need to drink,as opposed to sitting or being in a moist environment?How does the T receive hydration
through a wet substrate?I can see increasing moisture,or humidity,for molting issues.But for hydration,i don't see it helping.
If a T wont take water from a dish,or on the sides of the enclosure,sticking it in a wet container isn't likely to help the cause.
You add it with a syringe on the mouth assuming the T is really bad off. I have done this.

Even without manual watering, I have had a few Ts recover using an ICU with some damp, NOT soaking wet paper towels.

Re: increasing humidity and better molting, there is no scientific data to support this, it's mere speculation, likely a carry over from the reptile hobby w/there is a direct effect of humidity and shedding among snakes for example.
 

mack1855

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You add it with a syringe on the mouth assuming the T is really bad off. I have done this.
Ok,got that.But wouldn't it be better to do that, while it was in a properly setup enclosure,as opposed to an icu?
 

EulersK

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ICU's can be helpful, but it definitely does get irritating when people use them as a first line of defense. The only thing they're good for is severe dehydration... that's all. Putting a tarantula that has fallen from a height into an ICU is like treating a cold with antibiotics.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Just wondering about this icu thing that seems to be the first thing that newish T owners
do when their T,s don't seem to be doing well.
Of course they do that: they've heard about that on the Internet, therefore it's salvation. Then you noticed that their enclosure/s water dish was empty for a lot, or not present at all. Or the substrate inches level offered, a laughable one... in a huge enclosure. Heat mat/pads etc everywhere. And so on.

But here comes the saviour, the ICU :-s
 

Venom1080

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So was the icu used because the original enclosure was difficult to keep moist enough?Or used for you to
keep a closer eye on your N.incei.Or other reasons you went with the icu?
it was a last resort. the spider couldnt even move, it would just spaz into a ball every time i opened the cage. i figured it would be better to just try something than give up.
 

Ungoliant

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Of course they do that: they've heard about that on the Internet, therefore it's salvation.
The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, which we often tell new keepers to read, has a whole section on ICUs. I know I initially came away from reading it thinking that ICUs were intended for more tarantulas and more conditions than ICUs are actually good for.
 

Chris LXXIX

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The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, which we often tell new keepers to read, has a whole section on ICUs. I know I initially came away from reading it thinking that ICUs were intended for more tarantulas and more conditions than ICUs are actually good for.
Not me. I never suggested to anyone, here, to buy the TKG. After all I've started to keep T's in 1992, as a teen, and here in this corner of the world, frankly, Mr. Stan Schultz (with all the respect for him) was a perfect unknow :-s

The TKG is class, however, when anatomy is concerned.
 

Ungoliant

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Not me. I never suggested to anyone, here, to buy the TKG. After all I've started to keep T's in 1992, as a teen, and here in this corner of the world, frankly, Mr. Stan Schultz (with all the respect for him) was a perfect unknow :-s
All I'm saying is that it's not just on the Internet where people are hearing about ICUs but also in a widely recommended book on tarantula care. So it's no surprise that people think the ICU applies more liberally than it does. o_O
 

Andrea82

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All I'm saying is that it's not just on the Internet where people are hearing about ICUs but also in a widely recommended book on tarantula care. So it's no surprise that people think the ICU applies more liberally than it does. o_O
True. But people need to look at the year it is published. It is very outdated concerning care and maintenance. The info on ICU is as well.

Another thing an ICU gives is the feeling to be doing SOMETHING as opposed to not being able to help a T. When a T is sick, we are pretty much helpless, and not being able to do anything to help sucks.
 

Chris LXXIX

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All I'm saying is that it's not just on the Internet where people are hearing about ICUs but also in a widely recommended book on tarantula care.
Ok, I understand of course. I know that. But mostly were/are Canadians & Americans, not so many in Europe, especially long way back then. Now please consider that when I've started to keep T's the Internet didn't even existed (obviously) and Stan Schultz and his book were not even in the slightly way famous here (still not even translated today in 2017-- not that I need that, but it's a bad sign -- plus we had our Arachnid pundits book ones at the end) where the "old school" of T's keeping caring basically was the German and local one. A time where you had to travel for buy arachnids, and good info/s weren't easily at hand.

It's not a rule for everyone... that's what I'm saying. I've heard about him more here on this site in two years than in the last 23 years of T's keeping.

And btw the TKG is a very overestimated book IMO: I save only the anatomy part, the temperature advice and Mr. Stan writing ability, great to read. But that's all :-s
 
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