I am such an idiot again

Arachnopuppy

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
715
I brought all my Ts home for christmas break. I kept them in the living room temporarily before my brothers and sisters and their husbands, wives, and children get back to my parents' house. Somehow, my A seemanni got out of the cage 2 days before my sister and her family arrived. By the way, her husband is an arachnophobe. I had to call her up and tell her about it so they could prepare. Luckily, I found her (the T) the in the morning of the day my sister arrived, so everything turned out to be a happy ending. Afterward, my parents' place was filled with people so I asked my parents if I could keep the Ts in their room and they agreed. Everything went smoothly until this morning when I was getting ready to go back to school. I found the cage, once again, openned and there was nothing inside. I am now in my school dorm and my T is still somewhere in my parents' room, which is now unoccupied as my parents decided to move to another room in the house temporarily. Can you believe it? 2 escapes in such a short time. Hopefully my parents won't panic and react violently to the T when it shows itself to them.
 
T

Tarantula

Guest
How did the spider escape? Was it your lack of attention or just a crafty spider?
 

Pyrdacor

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 23, 2002
Messages
195
Don't you lock up your cages? My Ts in fact can not escape when I'm not opening the cages because they are locked. IMO this is kind of necessary because my sister is an arachnophobe too :)
 

Arachnopuppy

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
715
Yes, I do lock the cages well. Right now, I still don't know how the T got out. Never happened to me like that before. My 3 year old niece had been staying with my parents for quite some time. So, even though nobody is saying anything, she is still on the top of my suspect list.
 

JDK

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
125
The spider originates from Costa-Rica where it lives in deep burrows in the tropical rainforest. The abdomen is usually a brown to black colour with russet hairs, orange spinnerets and underbelly complete this arachnids ensemble. The legs are dark brown/black with distinct longitudinal cream lines down the legs.

This is not normally considered a suitable starter tarantula, due to it's generally skittish nature and it's liberal dose of Houdini genes (this species tends to be a keen ESCAPOLOGIST.)

http://www.arachnophiliac.com/burrow/caresheets/aphonopelma_semmanni.htm

You probably already know this but I wanted to post it anyway.
 

Arachnopuppy

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
715
Hehehe. Yes, I know. I've had her for about 2 years now. Never had any trouble with her until now. I disagree with the A seemanni not suitable for beginners claim. They are skittish at times but never have I seen or heard them do any harm to anyone. Their fast movements at times can be more appealing to beginners than the typical rosea, which I think that beginners find boring. I love rose hairs, but only after about 2 years of keeping Ts.
 

Ephesians

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
353
The spider originates from Costa-Rica where it lives in deep burrows in the tropical rainforest. The abdomen is usually a brown to black colour with russet hairs, orange spinnerets and underbelly complete this arachnids ensemble. The legs are dark brown/black with distinct longitudinal cream lines down the legs.
lol, where did all of that come from? I was just reading the post... la la la..then that appeared. I was like umm...okay. Anyway, good luck, lam. How far from home do you live? Is it going to be next Christmas until you get a chance to go look for it? :p I can just see it creating a little burrow behind your moms undie drawer and you're just gonna have to dig throug everything to find it! =D =D ;P

Marcus
 

Arachnopuppy

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
715
That was my reaction too until I reread it more carefully and thought that JDK posted it just in case I was new with tarantula keeping.

About that link, it sounded like whoever wrote that article had never even seen a real live tarantula. I mean what the heck is this?

"Because this is generally skittish species, handling is not recommended."

Handling not recommended for an A. seemanni?

Edited: Oh, forgot to answer your question. It's not a matter of distance from home. It's just a matter of finding the darn thing. I have learned that the best way to find a free roaming tarantula is just to wait for it to come out. This requires patience and time. I have patience but I don't have the time to wait at home for her. I'll be staying here over the summer and the occasional visits to home won't do me any good unless the it just happens that the T decides to take a stroll that particular day.
 
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