Humidifer

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,671
How many of yall use a humidifer?

Since I have a walk in closet and have 5 tarantulas, two lizards and 2 scorpions I use a humidifer which works really well and it keeps the humidity up. None of my tarantulas have molted yet so I'm not sure how well it works for them. However, I never have to mist at all and the humidity stays between 60-80%.
 

Brian S

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
May 29, 2004
Messages
6,543
My humidifier is pouring water on the substrate and restricting ventilation ;)
 

Brian S

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
May 29, 2004
Messages
6,543
What isnt a good thing? The humidifier? It is ok but for moisture loving sp you still need to keep the substrate a little damp
 

midnight_maiden

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 19, 2007
Messages
98
How many of yall use a humidifer?

Since I have a walk in closet and have 5 tarantulas, two lizards and 2 scorpions I use a humidifer which works really well and it keeps the humidity up. None of my tarantulas have molted yet so I'm not sure how well it works for them. However, I never have to mist at all and the humidity stays between 60-80%.
I have actually thought of this. I however do not have very many T's or the space that you have for a larger humidifier. I have seen smaller humidifiers for sale on the Petco website for about $35.00, but they are about 12" long or more. Not ideal for the size of enclosures I use. Anyway it's good to see that others are thinking this way and that it seems to work.
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,671
What isnt a good thing? The humidifier? It is ok but for moisture loving sp you still need to keep the substrate a little damp
yes I know this since my tarantulas are terresterial I mist the tank every other day because when I mist it, it gets really damp so i kind of give it a day to dry out.
 

Mina

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 4, 2005
Messages
2,136
We use a humidifier for the house in general in the winter, so I guess the answer is yes. I still make sure that my high humidity Ts get sprayed twice a week though.
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2006
Messages
569
We use a humidifier for the house in general in the winter, so I guess the answer is yes. I still make sure that my high humidity Ts get sprayed twice a week though.
Same here

Steph
 

elyanalyous

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Messages
484
i know that Pyst posted in here about a month or 2 ago in regards to humidifyers... perhaps you should look that thread up... i think there is a good explanation inthere...
 

Pyst

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
266
The humdifier I bought doesn't work very well but it manages some of the time. No problems so far. Since the cold weather is almost over here and the heat will no longer be used I'll buy a different one next fall.
 

P.jasonius

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 19, 2006
Messages
423
What is this? looks like a fish tank bubbler pumping are into the water with tubes of moist air coming out?????
That's exactly what it is. Cheaper and easier to clean than the ones you can buy, that I've seen anyway.
Materials: Air pump, Air stone, clear vinyl tubing, One gallon pickle jar (size and previous contents optional), silicon caulk (optional), filter pad material, distilled water.
Tools: Drill and drill bit, sized to tubing, sharpie marker (optional), knife/ scissors/ box cutter.
I used a double output air pump, in case I wanted to increase the capacity later on by adding another air stone, but right now I have it leading to one large air stone. I have a larger diameter tube coming out than going in, as I was getting some condensation in the line that was cutting off air flow. I suggest wrapping some adhesive insulation around the line carrying the humid air, but take it for what its worth because i haven't tried it yet. One can also drill more than one output line, for multiple tanks. I chose a pickle jar because a) it's glass and will therefore not dissociate any plastic chemicals, b) because the large mouth makes maintenance easier, and c) because I loves me some pickles. You don't have to make such a large humidifier, I imagine you could make one out of the smallest air pump there is with a smaller jar and be fine for most setups.
Note: Always make sure the equipment works before installing it, this will help you avoid high blood pressure later in life.

Directions: 1)Given one lid to a glass jar of suitable size, unscrew the lid. Mark how many and where you want the air lines to come in and out (refer to figure), and drill pilot holes- 1/16inch, into the lid where you mark it. Now match the drill bit to the outside diameter of the air line(s), and drill through the pilot holes.
NoteI suggest making the drill bit slightly smaller than the air line if you aren't using silicon to seal it afterwards.
2)Attach air line to air pump, (Don't Attach the Air Stone!) and attach any other necessary materials, ie if it came with a check valve install this now. Run the line through the input hole drilled, and make sure the line has enough length to reach the bottom of the jar, and therefore the water. Cut line to length.
3)You may attach the airstone at this time, affixing to the bottom or lower side using suction cups or other hardware.
4)Run the output line(s) (the ones going from the jar to your habitat) into the lid until about 2 inches of tubing is exposed on the bottom side of the lid.
Note: This length is relative to the size jar you use, you don't want these tubes going down into the water.
Now estimate how much tubing you need to go to your habitat, and cut to size. I suggest leaving a bit extra on there and recut later.
5)optional- Apply silicon arounf the tubing on the lid to make it as airtight as possible
6)Pour distilled water about halfway into the jar, covering the airstone.
NoteDirections for use of airstone may apply, read them.
7)Cut filter pad to size bigger than diameter of the jar, so that it binds up and stays toward the top of the jar. You may also find some (non-corrosive) item to support the filter pad to ensure it stays near the lid.
8)Ensure that the 'output' line(s)' opening(s) are touching the filter pad. This will reduce condensation in the line(s).
9)Screw the lid on
10)Run the output line(s) to your habitat(s), and plug in the air pump.

Remember to do maintenance on your humidifier at least once every couple months. Run the jar through the dish washer, wash or replace filter pad, and disinfect the lid.
 

Attachments

KnK

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 30, 2006
Messages
9
Humity in my terrariuns

Hi guys, I don't think isn't necesary to use a humidifer, here all my T's terrariuns are very humity, how???? This is the answer (ashuahusahu):
I get the TheNatural's substrate and modify... now its rocks on the deep I'd like to use like a natural filter, there stay water, up the rocks got coconut fiber and earth... When the sun or any heat gets there the water evaporate stay a beauty fog in the terrarium!!! It's a great, easy and cheap idea!!!



Sorry about my english, its a bit rusty:}
 

Thoth

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 9, 2005
Messages
1,323
I use one more for my own personal comfort (heating system makes the air very dry) and any benefit to the ts a side bonus. I do what BrianS does to keep up humidity
 
Top