How do you care for a green bottle blue and is this setup ok

The Amazing Me

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I am really sorry I am not the best of making decisions. I am just asking how do you take care of one? I am wondering are they easier than the Chaclodes. I am deciding on the 2 or is a curly hair better? I am so confused. I am looking into a GBB because it is a beautiful animal.
Will a small plastic shoebox be ok for a GBB? Does ecoearth fine and I am looking for cork bark instead of that skull I do have a reptile log from a pet store will that be fine? WHat are the humidity needs.
Once again I am a confused noob who can't make up his freaking mind and needs information. XD Thanks everyone
 

The Amazing Me

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And do they need a heat pad my house is 65%F and I am 16 could the venom do a lot of damge or is that the Cobalt blue?
 

nicodimus22

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Bone dry substrate. Webbing anchor points because it webs like crazy. Water dish. Hide. That's pretty much all you need.

No tarantula needs a heat pad. Mild venom compared to Old World Ts.

B. albopilosum and A. chalcodes are two of my favorites. Can't really go wrong with either, although the chalcodes is very easily spooked.
 
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Moakmeister

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Bone dry substrate. Webbing anchor points because it webs like crazy. Water dish. Hide. That's pretty much all you need.

No heat pad. Mild venom compared to Old World Ts.

B. albopilosum and A. chalcodes are two of my favorites. Can't really go wrong with either, although the chalcodes is very easily spooked.
By "anchor points" he means some plastic plants with places for the spider to attach its webs.
 

Andrea82

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'Gbb' (C.cyaneopubescens) is best kept dry, no heating required, although 65F is a bit low imo. But nothing big. Like others said,substrste, add a hide and some plants and sticks for webbing, a waterdish, and you're done. Keep in mind though, this species is very skittish and quite fast. Not sure what you mean by 'easier than an A.chalcodes', since that is a very beginner-friendly species from what I've gathered.
The B.albopilosum is less skittish, likes to excavate some and is a good eater. It was my first :).
 

viper69

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I am really sorry I am not the best of making decisions. I am just asking how do you take care of one? I am wondering are they easier than the Chaclodes. I am deciding on the 2 or is a curly hair better? I am so confused. I am looking into a GBB because it is a beautiful animal.
Will a small plastic shoebox be ok for a GBB? Does ecoearth fine and I am looking for cork bark instead of that skull I do have a reptile log from a pet store will that be fine? WHat are the humidity needs.
Once again I am a confused noob who can't make up his freaking mind and needs information. XD Thanks everyone
You're getting the wrong T as a beginner, get the A. chalcodes.
 

The Grym Reaper

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Get the A. chalcodes or B. albopilosum, both are ideal starters.

A GBB is a good 2nd, 3rd or 4th T but I wouldn't recommend it as your 1st due to its speed and skittishness.
 

clive 82

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I am really sorry I am not the best of making decisions. I am just asking how do you take care of one? I am wondering are they easier than the Chaclodes. I am deciding on the 2 or is a curly hair better? I am so confused. I am looking into a GBB because it is a beautiful animal.
Will a small plastic shoebox be ok for a GBB? Does ecoearth fine and I am looking for cork bark instead of that skull I do have a reptile log from a pet store will that be fine? WHat are the humidity needs.
Once again I am a confused noob who can't make up his freaking mind and needs information. XD Thanks everyone[/QU
If this is your first T I would say go for the A chalcodes.
While the GBB is easy to keep they are faster & more skittish than the A chalcodes which could be a bit off putting for you,
 

nicodimus22

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Get the A. chalcodes or B. albopilosum, both are ideal starters.
Did we establish why G. pulchripes is off the table? IMO it's a better overall starter than the A. chalcodes, which is more skittish.

If you just dislike the way they look or something, that's totally cool. These are very aesthetically-centered pets.
 

Moakmeister

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Did we establish why G. pulchripes is off the table? IMO it's a better overall starter than the A. chalcodes, which is more skittish.

If you just dislike the way they look or something, that's totally cool. These are very aesthetically-centered pets.
It's da besd sturter
 

The Grym Reaper

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Did we establish why G. pulchripes is off the table? IMO it's a better overall starter than the A. chalcodes, which is more skittish.

If you just dislike the way they look or something, that's totally cool. These are very aesthetically-centered pets.
I didn't realise it was on the table, the OP mentioned A. chalcodes & B. albopilosum. My chalcodes is pretty calm, the only time she moves with any speed is at feeding time, when disturbed she calmly walks into her hide.

I don't have a problem with G. pulchripes (I have one and the little bugger trolls me constantly, it's quite funny), it would've been my first choice to start as I didn't (and still don't) want to get a Rosie but at the time I could only find slings and I thought a juvenile or bigger would've been better to start off with so I got a 2" female B. albopilosum.
 

johnny quango

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This is the perfect order in my opinion
1st B albopilosum (hobby or true)
2nd G pulchripes
3nd A chalcodes
4th C cyaneopubesens

The reasons are simple B albopilosum very easy to care for, good eaters probably the best starter and alot more beautiful than people think, and very cheap also abundant and more forgiving than just about any tarantula.

G pulchripes is pretty much as above but Grammostola sp can fast which does and will freak some new keepers out even though it shouldn't.

Aphonopelma chalcodes are very simple to keep and pretty forgiving of new keepers and the only reason I've kept it till later in the list is simply because they're native to your country so technically you shouldn't find them hard to come by.

C cyaneopubesens (Gbb) although they aren't the worst choice for a starter tarantula they can be a little skittish and very fast, On the plus side they eat like crazy and grow fast they're also easy to care for out of the ones mentioned they probably live the least amount of years as most of the others live 20+ years

Any of the tarantulas mentioned can be mean, skittish reclusive etc so it's pretty much pot luck. My Gbb is as calm as any tarantula I have and yet my G pulchripes is really skittish.
My B albo and A chalcodes are both sweethearts as most are
 

bryverine

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So just my perspective on GBB. I raised my girl from a little over an inch. My girl has always been skittish. By skittish I mean that at the slightest noise/breath it would disappear into its burrow/web hide.
I've never seen aggressive behavior unless you consider food. She regularly tackled food just under her legspan.

No, nobody said or implied the following, but thought I might clarify. I don't consider them to be anywhere on the level of poecs or C. lividus you mentioned earlier. They have vastly different forms of skittish:
  • GBBs run when startled.
  • Poecs run in EVERY direction when startled.
  • Lividus run at the threat and posture/slap/bite at the intruder when startled.
  • As a further comparison my B. smithi (thats right, I said smithi! I'm taking a stand! #antiprogress) acts quite similar to my GBB.
 

Andrea82

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So just my perspective on GBB. I raised my girl from a little over an inch. My girl has always been skittish. By skittish I mean that at the slightest noise/breath it would disappear into its burrow/web hide.
I've never seen aggressive behavior unless you consider food. She regularly tackled food just under her legspan.

No, nobody said or implied the following, but thought I might clarify. I don't consider them to be anywhere on the level of poecs or C. lividus you mentioned earlier. They have vastly different forms of skittish:
  • GBBs run when startled.
  • Poecs run in EVERY direction when startled.
  • Lividus run at the threat and posture/slap/bite at the intruder when startled.
  • As a further comparison my B. smithi (thats right, I said smithi! I'm taking a stand! #antiprogress) acts quite similar to my GBB.
C.lividus actively chases you?? Man, that's one mean spider :D
 

cold blood

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cold blood

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Aside from being on the skittish side, GBBs are a super easy keep...the don't just like dry, they require it. All of the species you are looking at and the pulchripes are all equally simple to keep and all can be kept dry with a water dish from about 2". GBB will want dry by 1"....if you are getting slings.
 
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