How are centipedes escape artists?

Staehilomyces

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They aren't nearly as dumb as most people think. Here is a photo of my girl 2mins being in her temperary enclosure. View attachment 229772
Tell that to one of the kids at my school. He hates centipedes with a passion, and maintains, based on no evidence whatsoever, that centipedes have no brains because they are physically too small to have them (though he mysteriously fell silent when I mentioned Pygmy chameleons). Personally, I think centipedes seem to have more driving them than just pure instinct. Aside from being crafty escape artists, few bugs will get properly accustomed to handling like centipedes do.

Sorta related, is it possible for a Scolopendra sp. to escape a Kritter Keeper?
It's possible, depends on how big the pede is in comparison to the holes.
 

Christianb96

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Tell that to one of the kids at my school. He hates centipedes with a passion, and maintains, based on no evidence whatsoever, that centipedes have no brains because they are physically too small to have them (though he mysteriously fell silent when I mentioned Pygmy chameleons). Personally, I think centipedes seem to have more driving them than just pure instinct. Aside from being crafty escape artists, few bugs will get properly accustomed to handling like centipedes do.


It's possible, depends on how big the pede is in comparison to the holes.
How exactly should you go about trying to handle your centipede? it's something I'd be interested in trying in the future. Are there certain species that generally more docile? I know they all can be aggressive and unpredictable, my polymorpha is a psycho
 

Chris LXXIX

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That's what I thought. I knew that you can't sex a centipede, so most of the time its a gamble if you have a male or female. It's sad that these amazing predatory insects aren't more renown. I think a lot of people are scared off by the fact that they are venomous, which honestly I don't find to be a huge issue if you give your pede proper respect and a well built enclosure. They are intelligent and beautiful. I fell in love with them the moment I started to do research and can't get them off my mind!

I do wish there was more of a market for these amazing creatures. I think the only ones I can find around my area are the Scolopendra subpinipes (like mine), the Scolopendra alternans, and the Scolopendra heros.
You can, you can. Just that sex centipedes isn't (IMO) easy just like when it comes for T's, where if someone knows what to search, all you need is the exuvia (for a 100% accurate I.D). To sex centipedes is more complicated, check the vids in YT where people (before) literally 'drown' them (or put those KO with other stuff) and after they check... needless to say, this, added to the fact that there isn't a great market like for T's, lead sellers to 'meh' and they don't even bother doing that. I understand, somewhat. But sucks that centipedes aren't apprecciated too much :-/
 

Christianb96

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You can, you can. Just that sex centipedes isn't (IMO) easy just like when it comes for T's, where if someone knows what to search, all you need is the exuvia (for a 100% accurate I.D). To sex centipedes is more complicated, check the vids in YT where people (before) literally 'drown' them (or put those KO with other stuff) and after they check... needless to say, this, added to the fact that there isn't a great market like for T's, lead sellers to 'meh' and they don't even bother doing that. I understand, somewhat. But sucks that centipedes aren't apprecciated too much :-/
It is a shame. Ts get so much love, meanwhile pedes and scorpions don't.
 

Telsaro

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I grew up in the Upstate New York area (finger lake region) and it is common to see small red centipedes everywhere you look in the woods. I honestly didn't really pay any mind to pedes until I saw one of the giants up close. That experience really made me appreciate how magnificent they are.
 

Telsaro

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How exactly should you go about trying to handle your centipede? it's something I'd be interested in trying in the future. Are there certain species that generally more docile? I know they all can be aggressive and unpredictable, my polymorpha is a psycho
I was watching a few videos on YT of a guy successfully training all his pedes to be handled by him. (Source: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkEmI1pS0tCOZH0Waa7qmDQ)

He claims he was able to handle all of his pedes including some of the more naturally aggressive species with techniques he developed through his own research.
 

Christianb96

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That's pretty incredible, my only concern with them is I've never been bit and am concerned by how I'd react to the venom, I know some people can be quite allergic
 

Staehilomyces

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The most important thing is to stay calm. My morsitans was a maniac, but he never bit me because I never gave him a reason to. Just don't keep the pede on your hand for more than a few seconds at a time at first. I usually had my hands in the enclosure with the pede, like Mastigoproctus did in his Malaysian tiger centipede socialization vids. That was a subspinipes variant, so if it works with that, it will work with any other pede.
 

UltimateDracoMeteor

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It's possible, depends on how big the pede is in comparison to the holes.
Looking at a 1/4 inch tall pede that's around 6-7 inches long. I have a medium sized Kritter Keeper, but I also have surplus plastic shoeboxes that I could use if that's a better idea.
 

UltimateDracoMeteor

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IMO that's the best option if someone wants to find his/her centipede on the loose after 30 minutes :-s
Very good to know. What would you recommend for an enclosure? I have a medium kritter keeper, several plastic shoeboxes of varying sizes, and a 10 gallon terrarium without a functioning lid. The centipede I'm looking to buy is 6" long and 1/4-1/3" tall. I'm capable of drilling air holes if needed.
 

Telsaro

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Very good to know. What would you recommend for an enclosure? I have a medium kritter keeper, several plastic shoeboxes of varying sizes, and a 10 gallon terrarium without a functioning lid. The centipede I'm looking to buy is 6" long and 1/4-1/3" tall. I'm capable of drilling air holes if needed.
I would definitely avoid the KK. All those slots in the lid are prime escape opportunities for a pede. Rule is, if it can squeeze it's head through it will squeeze its while body through. They are quite strong and can be very determined. I have actually head of them chewing through some plastics as well.

Out of all the options you listed, the 10 gal tank sounds the best to me. I don't know where you are located, but here in NY I was able to find a lid for my 20gal tank right at my local Petsmart for $15. Just take measurements or bring it in and fit it right there (that's what I did). I use a metal screen lid with clips. It stays very snug, and you can add some weights or books to the top in areas you think aren't secure enough.

Also, good options are large Tupperware containers with locking lids. Drill some 1/8" holes in the top and you have a perfect enclosure. The issue I see with the shoe boxes is, depending on how tight the lids fit, your pede might be able to push the lid up enough to escape. It would be terrible to find your precious pede desiccated somewhere in your home.
 

Venom1080

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Very good to know. What would you recommend for an enclosure? I have a medium kritter keeper, several plastic shoeboxes of varying sizes, and a 10 gallon terrarium without a functioning lid. The centipede I'm looking to buy is 6" long and 1/4-1/3" tall. I'm capable of drilling air holes if needed.
the plastic shoe box is probably your best option. try to find a tall one so the pede cant run up and over the side when the tops off for feeding or maintenance.
 

UltimateDracoMeteor

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I would definitely avoid the KK. All those slots in the lid are prime escape opportunities for a pede. Rule is, if it can squeeze it's head through it will squeeze its while body through. They are quite strong and can be very determined. I have actually head of them chewing through some plastics as well.

Out of all the options you listed, the 10 gal tank sounds the best to me. I don't know where you are located, but here in NY I was able to find a lid for my 20gal tank right at my local Petsmart for $15. Just take measurements or bring it in and fit it right there (that's what I did). I use a metal screen lid with clips. It stays very snug, and you can add some weights or books to the top in areas you think aren't secure enough.

Also, good options are large Tupperware containers with locking lids. Drill some 1/8" holes in the top and you have a perfect enclosure. The issue I see with the shoe boxes is, depending on how tight the lids fit, your pede might be able to push the lid up enough to escape. It would be terrible to find your precious pede desiccated somewhere in your home.
I have a shoe box with a really secure lid and one with a less secure lid, if I have to use them I'll definitely use the most secure one for my pede. There's a PetSmart nearby, so I could look there for a lid. How large of a Tupperware would you recommend, and what kind of price would that entail? I'm trying to save the 10gal for an aquarium setup at some point, but if it's the cheapest option then I suppose I could use it.

the plastic shoe box is probably your best option. try to find a tall one so the pede cant run up and over the side when the tops off for feeding or maintenance.
Hm, I have one that's probably tall enough to stay safe, but the lid doesn't cover all the area--there's a small gap in between the lid and the box, so it's possible that if the pede could grab onto the ledge that it would escape. I was planning to use it for a tarantula at some point since they'll be much larger and unable to get through the gap.

Also, sorry for being such a noob. I appreciate that you're being gentle when answering my questions and not getting frustrated.
 
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Telsaro

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From my experience, they find a way to reach the top. I had mine climb from the cork bark, to the thermometer, to the lid in my 20inch tall tank.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Very good to know. What would you recommend for an enclosure? I have a medium kritter keeper, several plastic shoeboxes of varying sizes, and a 10 gallon terrarium without a functioning lid. The centipede I'm looking to buy is 6" long and 1/4-1/3" tall. I'm capable of drilling air holes if needed.
Being completely honest, actually I've seen on YT a couple of keepers with Scolopendridae housed in KK, but you know, aside from the YT part where there's (like always in life issues) a "good" part & a "bad/crappy" part one, it's a huge risk. Even if housed there there's an adult that "... it's impossible that will escape from those vents". The old motto that "if the head pass so will the body" is indeed true.

So I suggest to you to buy those (quite cheap here) plastic enclosures, a quite taller one (if you go for an adult, I mean), drill holes for air, and you will reduce the risks of an escape :-s
 
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