How active are E. murinus?

MasamuneX7

Arachnosquire
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Oct 16, 2005
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I have a H. lividum right now, which was my very first tarantula. Despite what people say about its aggressive nature, I've handled it a couple times and have never been bitten. It's a fast one though and doesn't hesitate to put up a threat pose. However, it has set up a nice deep burrow and I haven't seen it in the last 2 weeks, so its "pet hole" status is coming into play now. Anyways, I'm looking for a more active tarantula that is slightly friendlier and was wondering how E. murinus are.
 

KaineSoulblade

Arachnoknight
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May 24, 2007
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177
I have a H. lividum right now, which was my very first tarantula. Despite what people say about its aggressive nature, I've handled it a couple times and have never been bitten. It's a fast one though and doesn't hesitate to put up a threat pose. However, it has set up a nice deep burrow and I haven't seen it in the last 2 weeks, so its "pet hole" status is coming into play now. Anyways, I'm looking for a more active tarantula that is slightly friendlier and was wondering how E. murinus are.
Glad you asked, this is my favorite. They are quite active and make awesome webs. Mine does not hide but likes to sit at the mouth of the cubby hole I made for her where the web is funneled to. These guys are built for speed and are quite the acrobats for being terrestrial. They use those skinny back legs to propel off and jump. So respect the speed and ability to jump. They will literally cannon-ball off your hand if startled.

While mine is docile and handled regularly, there are some bad attitude Skeletons. As far as I've seen and asked its near 50/50 for defensiveness. Nothing beats their cool webs, brilliant markings and feathery front legs.
 

AphonopelmaTX

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May 7, 2004
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Well, let me be the first to offer a contradictory statement with my experience with Ephebopus murinus and other Ephebopus sp. Mine have always been "pet funnels". :) In every instance of keeping an Ephebopus species, I have provided enough substrate for burrowing and also in each instance, each individual created burrows with a web funnel-like opening. Mine have always been very shy and photosensitive and I hardly ever see them. All of the individuals of an Ephebopus species I've kept, including E. murinus, have been very defensive/ bitey but only when their burrows have been disturbed otherwise they run rather quickly down their burrows or up and out of their enclosure. I guess the latter statement so far supports the 50/ 50 on defensiveness. :)

The main point here is that in my experience, Ephebopus murinus is not a good choice for an active species as they have been more secretive and harder to maintain than H. lividum.

- Lonnie
 

KaineSoulblade

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
177
The main point here is that in my experience, Ephebopus murinus is not a good choice for an active species as they have been more secretive and harder to maintain than H. lividum.
That is a good example of the other end. Though I disagree with it being more secretive and harder to maintain than a Haplo. This person says they atleast see thier T. Be it running to its web or out of the enclosure. That's alot more than you'll get from a pet hole.

E. Murinus is a ravenous eater and its easy to coax them with food. So even if you get a shy one that sticks to its web you will probably atleast get to see it chow a lot.

It's a gamble on your part, if you would flip a coin on this T being what you want. I've heard the same about Parahybanas, either they are skittish and defensive kickers or not. Mine is not.
I've had two skeletons now and neither ever 'dug' into substrate. They both built webs at the mouth of an object or provided hide ontop of the substrate. But the Murinus is the only Ephebopus species I've kept or ineracted with.
 
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