Help with St. Lucian species ID

animaljosh

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Messages
8
Hello again,

I finally got a few pics (yah, I know they aren't the best, but I really tried and these are the best I have!) to post for help with a positive ID. I am having trouble with finding ANY info on species found here (both endemic and possible introduced). Ythier was kind enough to send me the possible three known species to be found, but I have searched for images and am coming up blank here. It doesn't help at all that my internet connection is AMAZINGLY slow! (remember 56K dial up???? well, that is fast comparatively speaking!) Anyway, I have ruled out BU Isometrus maculatus, that is definetly not it. The other two choices are BU Tityus insignis or SCN Didymocentrus lesueurii. Any help here at all would be greatly appreciated. Here is the info to go with the photos.....

Habitat: St Lucia W.I. Dry sandy, rocky area near coast. open ground as well
as densely
covered scrub. Three specimens found inside house after heavy rain

Size:the smallest 1 cm total length, largest so far 3 cm

description: see pics

Color: small specimens light brown, slightly transparent, older specimen deep
brown to black
 

Ryan C.

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Messages
1,285
Hey Josh,

This is definitely not Tityus insignis or I. maculatus, so it must be Didymocentrus lesueurii. Cool find!

Cheers,
Ryan
 

animaljosh

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Messages
8
Allright, is it perhaps a taxonamy issue in play here? I know that scorpion taxonomy is rather uncertain, compared to other animals. I myself am an apiculturist and the taxonomy is quick, easy, and certain, aside from the occasional subspecies claims (I won't get into that....) If it is indeed a new/introduced species where do I go from there? I have found many a pic from St Barts of oiclus purvesii that LOOK right, but I know that a picture in this case isn't neccesarily worth a thousand words! Know what I mean? Finding three specimens in 2 days of what appear to be the same species of multiple ages isn't just a fluke find. It would mean that these guys are getting/are established. Also, after talking to some of the local kids they say my specimens are small and they get much larger. I am currently attempting collections, but due to weather (hurricane Dean just went through yesterday, so I have other more important matters to tend to at the moment) it may be a little while. Any suggestions here?
 

animaljosh

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Messages
8
Also,I know how incredibly unreliable both kids and untrained people are at identification, so I take all of the local info with skepticism. Anybody got pics of SCN Didymocentrus lesueurii they can send me for comparison? It would be just the coolest if I'm onto something new here!!!!! But not cool at all if this is another careless introduction of a species by good ole homosapien....
 

pandinus

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
May 14, 2004
Messages
3,084
i'm going to say didymocentrus by process of elimination, and the fact that it looks not dissimilar to the Didymocentrus krausi i used to have (pic for reference)




John
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
3,479
It's not a buthid scorpion. I don't know how well these islands are collected, it could be another an unknown species, could be D. lesueurii. Looks like a male, judging by the size of the vesicle.
Nice scorpion
 

animaljosh

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Messages
8
From all info that I am finding, apparently St. Lucia isn't very well studied. Make that hardly studied at all! I guess I should have clarified that the first three photos are of one of two other smaller specimens I have in posessesion. YOu can see a size and color comparison in the two side by side photos. THe other specimen is half the size of the smaller one in photo. Almost like I've got a whole developmental cycle here! The smallest one is same color and looks same as little one above. THe largest is the darkest, but they all appear to be same species, or as best as I can tell! THe 1 cent peice is roughly the size of a US penny. Sorry I'm broke, didn't even have a damn penny for a comparison!!!! Good thing it is cheap to live here! And if I get hungry......... They taste really good fried!!! (seriously, they do. Don't know about these, but we used to deep fry emporers at a museum for an insect exhibition. Served em on a stick. Not bad at all!!!)
 

Ameiva

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 22, 2006
Messages
63
Hi Nice scorp
You can send a one clear and one dark individual has Dr Rolando Teruel of Cuba.
It is him who is the specialist of this family in the Antilles.
Moreover, he makes a publication on this family in the Caribbean, they will be probably very useful.:D
 

Ameiva

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 22, 2006
Messages
63
Animaljosh I sent your photos has Rolando Teruel, it identified all your scorpions as Didymocentrus lesueurii (Gervais 1844). The large & dark specimen is an adult female, and the two small and light ones are juveniles

A common species according to him, and occurs also in Martinique.:D
 

animaljosh

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Messages
8
Thank you so much for reinforcing the ID. Now I'm as sure as it gets!!!! I'll be lurking around finding more info. You all will see me again. Thanks for all the help!!!!!

Josh
 
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