Help Me Pick What to Keep!

Matts inverts

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
590
If you are in a warmer state you might find invasive Indian stick insects
 

Matts inverts

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
590
They are legal because they are invasive. Also since you weren’t planning to breed them, it will just be a cool surprise to find them. They also produce with only a female.
 

goliathusdavid

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2020
Messages
381
They are legal because they are invasive. Also since you weren’t planning to breed them, it will just be a cool surprise to find them. They also produce with only a female.
This is incorrect. Something being invasive doesn't make it legal. Both native and exotic Phasmids require both a permit and containment facility. The ONLY and I mean ONLY means of circumventing this law is by collecting in state species and never moving them across state lines. I think that is what you are trying to say here, but your wording suggest that they are an easy group of animals to acquire, and that there is little regulation. Neither of those are true. They are an incredibly high risk species to both agriculture and native wildlife, and should be handled as such. For more information on Phasmid regulation please see this link.
As regards reproduction, you are also incorrect. Many Phasmid species (including the Indian stick insects you mention) are parthenogenetic meaning even if you are not trying to breed them, they can still reproduce.
I know I am being nit picky about wording and the law here, but its for a very good reason. These are regulated because they can be incredibly destructive, and are a high priority group for USDA\APHIS. I don't want to see the OP become like so many other people on arachnoboards, illegally ordering Phasmids from USMantis or some other seller who shouldn't have them.
Finally, the setup wouldn't work for them. Phasmids are not a good recommendation for this setup or, frankly, for keepers in general (unless they are willing to do it legally).
 

The Mantis Menagerie

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 17, 2018
Messages
351
I think one of the more communal species of mantids would do well in this setup. I have been using bioactive tanks for my Brunneria borealis nymphs with great success. I have even accidentally created a cricket breeding population in a 20-gallon that kept up with a mantis’s appetite for quite a while. Therefore, it is theoretically possible to introduce certain prey insects, such as certain, surface-active roach species, to reduce the needed feeding frequency, which will be helpful when the mantids are hiding in the huge space.
 

Scorpiobsession

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2021
Messages
78
What's the definition of a containment facility? Are there set regulations or would it be as simple as covering vents with a screen and putting a door sweep under the door?
 

Matts inverts

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
590
You have to have a room with a double door not connected to your house with escape proof vents and the enclosures have to be escape proof. Then an inspector will say if it’s good to keep bugs or other animals with a permit
 

The Mantis Menagerie

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 17, 2018
Messages
351
You have to have a room with a double door not connected to your house with escape proof vents and the enclosures have to be escape proof. Then an inspector will say if it’s good to keep bugs or other animals with a permit
It does not have to be separate from the house, but it does have to be dedicated. The USDA also hates carpet or hardwood floor. It will have to be either concrete or maybe vinyl.
 
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