Has anyone seen this? Artificial incubation

Galapoheros

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I wouldn't have done that, but I'm interested in seeing how his project goes at the same time. Of course I hope they make it but my bet is that they will die. Thanks for the link.
 
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micheldied

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I wouldn't have done that, but I'm interested in seeing how his project goes at the same time. Of course I hope they make it but I my bet is that they will die. Thanks for the link.
Especially with a species like this, I wouldn't have done it either.
 

cacoseraph

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i am tempted to try it if i get a bunch of local tiger females to make eggs for me.

this could be a game changer for centis if a reliable artificial incubation method could be developed :D :D :D



i also was under the impression the mom did stuff to help the eggs out. some kind of cleaning secretion or just plain manual/mechanical cleaning of them or something.

maybe rotating the eggs is necessary, too?

ftr: i would have used at least one brush instead of two spoons to move the eggs


edit:

i've removed white polymorpha nymphs and raised them separately before with no harm. we need to keep working backwards and figure this out :D
 

J Morningstar

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He was quoted after the video that the eggs died within a few days, molded too. The mother does secrete something she rubs over the eggs, I have also noticed that usually centipede tanks will have a difficult time molding when lived in but after the host is removed the tanks mold easily. Now I am not as technically knowagable as most of the "top athorities" on the boards, but, if centipedes have been known to leave raised itchy marks after the tips of their legs run across soft skin that they have a semi acidic substance on them and that perhaps it is a VERY dilute venom or other substance that is produced (digestive enzyme,ect.) that they use to coat the eggs with. In any case the incubator would have bto be uber sterile and then i am almost sure moved or rotated daily, but we really would need to reproduce "the substance" that coats them to make this work at all.
 

peterbourbon

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ftr: i would have used at least one brush instead of two spoons to move the i've removed white polymorpha nymphs and raised them separately before with no harm. we need to keep working backwards and figure this out :D
Hmm...I thought about that when I saw the viridis-pedelings leaving mother. I was surprised...They were completely white colored pedes, but decided to explore the terrarium, hence they seemed to be ready for the environment.

Since virdis is related to S.polymorpha in a certain way I ask myself if polymorpha-plings also miss coloration when they leave the mother. This could possibly explain why you had success - they were already "colored" (but white), almost ready to leave. But I don't know for sure. I was only surprised when I saw it. A few pedes seem to gain coloration some time after leaving the mother.

Cheers
Turgut
 

cacoseraph

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they start to explore when they are white but stay with the mom at least part of the time. they do eat when they are white, though.
 

micheldied

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I have also raised white mutilans peelings separated from their mother before. This just before they started to leave the mother. Cas, give it a go and tell us the results of your experiment!
 

Draiman

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I have also raised white mutilans peelings separated from their mother before. This just before they started to leave the mother. Cas, give it a go and tell us the results of your experiment!
While they were still 1st instars/nymphs? Or merely newly molted, uncolored 2nd instars?

I could try this with one of my tigerleg clutches.
 

micheldied

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While they were still 1st instars/nymphs? Or merely newly molted, uncolored 2nd instars?

I could try this with one of my tigerleg clutches.
I believe they were, yes.
I only did it with a few plings, not the whole batch.
 

Draiman

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I believe they were, yes.
I only did it with a few plings, not the whole batch.
Cool. I'll separate a few of my tigerleg nymphs tomorrow and see if I can raise them successfully, and whether they'll grow faster or slower than the ones that are in the mother's care.
 

micheldied

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Cool. I'll separate a few of my tigerleg nymphs tomorrow and see if I can raise them successfully, and whether they'll grow faster or slower than the ones that are in the mother's care.
Should be an interesting experiment. All of mine did better with the parent.
 

peterbourbon

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Hi,

I think this manual "incubation" would only make sense if you are afraid of a mother eating the eggs. If you raise nymphs (when they have already legs) the risk wouldn't be so high to loose the clutch.

Cheers
Turgut
 

micheldied

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Hi,

I think this manual "incubation" would only make sense if you are afraid of a mother eating the eggs. If you raise nymphs (when they have already legs) the risk wouldn't be so high to loose the clutch.

Cheers
Turgut
Oh definitely. I believe he said he was afraid of the mom eating the eggs.
 
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